A federal judge just dealt another blow to the Trump administration's crackdown on 'sanctuary cities'

In a victory for so-called "sanctuary cities," a federal judge in Chicago on Friday issued a nationwide injunction that blocks Attorney General Jeff Sessions' attempt to deny certain funding to jurisdictions that refuse to cooperate with federal immigration authorities.

US District Judge Harry Leinenweber said in the ruling that Sessions had exceeded his authority in imposing new conditions on jurisdictions' eligibility for a major grant that funds police departments across the country, The Chicago Tribune reported.

Sessions in July toughened the Department of Justice's crackdown on sanctuary cities by announcing that certain grant programs for cities and states would be awarded only to jurisdictions that allow federal immigration officers into detention facilities and provide 48 hours' notice before releasing inmates wanted by federal authorities.

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Sanctuary Cities in the USA
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Sanctuary Cities in the USA

Washington, DC

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New York City, New York

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Jersey City, New Jersey

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Los Angeles, California

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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

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San Francisco, California

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San Diego, California

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San Jose, California

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Oakland, California

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Salt Lake City, Utah

(Photo: Kenneth C. Zirkel)

Houston, Texas

(Photo: Jeremy Woodhouse)

Detroit, Michigan 

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Chicago, Illinois 

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Minneapolis, Minnesota 

(Photo: Rudy Balasko)

Denver, Colorado

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Baltimore, Maryland

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Seattle, Washington

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Portland, Oregon

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New Haven, Connecticut 

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Cambridge, Massachusetts

(Photo: Cassandra Hubbart, AOL)

Portland, Maine

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The move was a significant escalation in the Trump administration's approach to sanctuary jurisdictions, which typically refuse to honor federal requests to detain immigrants in jails past their scheduled release dates unless the requests are accompanied by a judicial warrant.

Chicago, among other jurisdictions, reacted with hostility to the measures, saying they would infringe upon the independence of local law-enforcement agencies and undermine the inroads police officers have made in gaining trust from immigrant communities fearful that encounters with the local police will lead to deportations.

Leinenweber apparently agreed, saying in his ruling that Sessions had attempted an "unprecedented seizure of power" in imposing such conditions on law enforcement grants, The Chicago Sun-Times reported.

Sessions has frequently assailed Chicago's sanctuary policies and linked them to the city's high violent crime and murder rates. Last month, Sessions accused local officials there of obstructing federal immigration laws "to a degree perhaps unsurpassed by any other jurisdiction" after the city sued over his threat to cut off the grants.

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Colorado woman finds sanctuary from deportation in a church
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Colorado woman finds sanctuary from deportation in a church
The United Methodist Church where undocumented immigrant Rosa Sabido lives in sanctuary while facing deportation is seen in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Immigrant Rosa Sabido, 53, brushes her teeth after waking up in the United Methodist Church in which she lives while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido, 53, takes a shower after waking up in the United Methodist Church in which she lives while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido wakes up in the United Methodist Church in which she lives while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
The United Methodist Church where undocumented immigrant Rosa Sabido lives in sanctuary while facing deportation is seen in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Immigrant Rosa Sabido, 53, (C) takes part in a yoga class in the United Methodist Church in which she lives while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
The wrecking yard where immigrant Rosa Sabido's stepfather works is seen from the home Rosa left to live in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation, in Cortez, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A leaflet is seen during a strategy meeting for immigrant Rosa Sabido who lives in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 18, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido (L), who lives in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation, says goodbye to her friend Jen Paschal, 53, in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 18, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido, who lives in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation, poses for a portrait in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido, 53, cries as she sits on her bed in the United Methodist Church in which she lives while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido pets a friend's dog while living in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 20, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido sits in the United Methodist Church in which she lives while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A piano and games are seen in the United Methodist Church in which immigrant Rosa Sabido, 53, lives while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Blanca Estela Valdivia, 70, mother of immigrant Rosa Sabido sits on the porch of her home, which is next door to the home Rosa left to live in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation, in Cortez, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Messages of support are seen in the bedroom of immigrant Rosa Sabido who lives in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido, 53, (R), who lives in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation, says goodbye to her mother Blanca Estela Valdivia, 70, in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 18, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido, 53, sits at her desk in the United Methodist Church in which she lives while facing deportation in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Roberto Obispo, 65, stepfather of immigrant Rosa Sabido, stands next to a shrine in his home, which is next door to the home Rosa left to live in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation, in Cortez, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Pastor Craig Paschal (R), hugs Blanca Estela Valdivia, 70, mother of immigrant Rosa Sabido who is living in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation, in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 18, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Immigrant Rosa Sabido, 53, (L) who lives in sanctuary in the United Methodist Church while facing deportation, says goodbye to her mother Blanca Estela Valdivia, 70, in Mancos, Colorado, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON CHURCH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
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"No amount of federal taxpayer dollars will help a city that refuses to help its own residents," Sessions said in a statement. "This is astounding given the unprecedented crime surge in Chicago, with the number of murders in 2016 surpassing both New York and Los Angeles combined."

At stake for Chicago is roughly $2.3 million from the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant. That pales in comparison to Chicago's $9.8 billion budget, but Chicago officials have argued that more grants are likely to be at risk if the Trump administration is permitted to make such funding conditional upon cooperation with immigration authorities.

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