Sean Spicer stands by Trump, defends 'alternative facts' on 'Jimmy Kimmel Live!'

Sean Spicer made it clear during his stint on Jimmy Kimmel Live! on Wednesday that he was standing by President Trump after resigning as White House press secretary in August.

When asked if he was distancing himself from President Trump after leaving, Spicer replied, "Absolutely not."

He was replaced by Sarah Huckabee Sanders in July. Wednesday's show was his first late-night appearance since officially leaving his post.

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Former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer
Outgoing White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer waves as he walks into the White House in Washington, U.S., July 21, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House spokesman Sean Spicer holds a briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) Tom Price (L-R), Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney and White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer speak to reporters after the Congressional Budget Office released its score on proposed Republican health care legislation at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

White House Communications Director Sean Spicer holds the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. February 2, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer (L) takes questions during a daily briefing at the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House January 23, 2017 in Washington, DC. Spicer conducted his first official White House daily briefing to take questions from the members of the White House press corps.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer holds the daily press briefing January 23, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump (L-R), joined by Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Vice President Mike Pence, senior advisor Steve Bannon, Communications Director Sean Spicer and National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, speaks by phone with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 28, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

White House spokesman Sean Spicer takes questions during his press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., January 30, 2017.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Trump aide Omarosa Manigault (C) watches as White House spokesman Sean Spicer (R) arrives for a press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Rivals Brad Woodhouse (left) and Sean Spicer pose for a photograph outside Bullfeathers in Washington, D.C. on November 08, 2011. Sean Spicer and Brad Woodhouse (spokesmen for the RNC and DNC) hosts Congressional and other flacks to the 1st Annual 'Flacks for Flacks Who Wear Flak Jackets' Benefiting Military Public Affairs Officers serving in Afghanistan.

(Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30: White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer holds up paperwork highlighting and comparing language about the National Security Council from the Trump administration and previous administrations during the daily press briefing at the White House, January 30, 2017 in Washington, DC. U.S. President Donald Trump announced Monday that he will reveal his 'unbelievably highly respected' pick to replace the late Supreme Court Antonin Scalia on Tuesday evening. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 14: White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer leaves after a daily press briefing at the James Brady Press Briefing Room February 14, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC. Spicer discussed on various topics including the resignation of Michael Flynn from his position as National Security Adviser. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Trump advisor Steve Bannon (2L), White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (R), and White House spokesman Sean Spicer look on before the announcement of the Supreme Court nominee at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 31, 2017. President Donald Trump nominated federal appellate judge Neil Gorsuch as his Supreme Court nominee, tilting the balance of the court back in the conservatives' favor.

(BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer removes lint from Senior White House Advisor Stephen Miller's jacket as he waits to go on the air in the White House Briefing Room in Washington, U.S., February 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Sean Spicer, White House press secretary, center, attends a swearing in ceremony of White House senior staff in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Trump today mocked protesters who gathered for large demonstrations across the U.S. and the world on Saturday to signal discontent with his leadership, but later offered a more conciliatory tone, saying he recognized such marches as a hallmark of our democracy.

(Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

White House Director of Oval Office Operations Keith Schiller (L) carries a red USA hat and a copy of Fortune magazine with U.S. President Donald Trump on the cover as he and Communications Director Sean Spicer (R) deplane from Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S. March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Sean Spicer, left, is the new communications director for the Republican National Committee, and Rick Wiley, is the RNC� new political director.

(Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

Sean Spicer, White House press secretary, arrives to a swearing in ceremony of White House senior staff in the East Room of the White House on January 22, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump today mocked protesters who gathered for large demonstrations across the U.S. and the world on Saturday to signal discontent with his leadership, but later offered a more conciliatory tone, saying he recognized such marches as a 'hallmark of our democracy.'

(Photo by Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images)

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie stands alongside his wife, Mary Pat, and White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer (L), as US President Donald Trump signs House Joint Resolution 41, which removes some Dodd-Frank regulations on oil and gas companies, during a bill signing ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, February 14, 2017. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer makes a statement to members of the media at the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. This was Spicer's first press conference as Press Secretary where he spoke about the media's reporting on the inauguration's crowd size.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Stephen Miller(L) and Sean Spicer, arrive to meet with US President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York on January 10, 2017.

(BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer makes a statement to members of the media at the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. This was Spicer's first press conference as Press Secretary where he spoke about the media's reporting on the inauguration's crowd size.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer holds the daily press briefing January 23, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Incoming White House press secretary Sean Spicer takes a photo with his cell phone on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. In today's inauguration ceremony Donald J. Trump becomes the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Sean Spicer, a spokesman for the House Republican Conference, updates waiting media on progress of the meeting as House Republicans, eager to put a fresh face on their leadership team as they head into difficult November elections, chose John A. Boehner of Ohio as their new majority leader. Boehner beat out interim Majority Leader Roy Blunt of Missouri on the second ballot, 122-109. John Shadegg of Arizona, a late entrant into the race, was knocked out on the first ballot, when he drew 40 votes to 79 for Boehner and 110 for Blunt. Jim Ryun of Kansas drew two votes.

(Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

Sean Spicer, incoming press secretary for President-elect Donald Trump leaves from Trump Tower after meetings on January 5, 2017, in New York.

(KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Chief Strategist and Communications Director at the Republican National Committee, Sean Spicer is interviewed in his office at the committee's headquarters on Monday August 15, 2016 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Matt McClain/ The Washington Post via Getty Images)

National security adviser General Michael Flynn (L) arrives to deliver a statement next to Press Secretary Sean Spicer during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington U.S., February 1, 2017.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer speaks during a daily briefing at the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House January 23, 2017 in Washington, DC. Spicer conducted his first official White House daily briefing to take questions from the members of the White House press corps.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Press Secretary Sean Spicer speaks as television screen displays journalists who participate in the daily briefing via Skype at the White House in Washington U.S., February 1, 2017.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

President Donald Trump gestures to White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer (L) as he makes remarks to the press as he sits down for a working lunch with members of his cabinet and their spouses, including Veteran's Administration Secretary David Shulkin (2nd R) at Trump National Golf Club, Potomac Falls,Virginia, in suburban Washington, U.S., March 11, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
POTOMAC FALLS, VA - MARCH 11: White House Pres Secretary Sean Spicer briefs the press pool as President Donald Trump has a working lunch with staff and cabinet members and significant others at his golf course, Trump National on March 11, 2017 in Potomac Falls, Virginia. (Photo by Pete Marovich-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 14: White House Press secretary Sean Spicer points as he answers questions from members of the media and reporters, seen reflected in an exit sign, during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC on Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
White House spokesman Sean Spicer holds a press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 17, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
(COMBO)(FILES) This combination of file pictures created on July 21, 2017 shows former assistant to US President Donald Trump Anthony Scaramucci attending a meeting on the opening day of the World Economic Forum, on January 17, 2017 in Davos, and White House spokesman Sean Spicer during a press briefing on June 20, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC. Sean Spicer resigned as White House press secretary Friday in protest at a major shakeup of Donald Trump's embattled administration, an official told AFP. Spicer -- the administrations most recognizable face after the president -- resigned after just six months in office, having been increasingly sidelined in recent weeks. Spicer reached breaking point on Friday, the White House official said, when Trump appointed Anthony Scaramucci to be the new communications director, a bid to reset the scandal-wracked administration. / AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI AND NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI,NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer briefs members of the media during a daily briefing at the White House July 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Olivier Douliery (Photo credit should read OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images)
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When pressed on some of the more uncomfortable tasks he was faced with — including after the inauguration when he famously said the audience was the biggest ever, despite photographic evidence to the contrary — Spicer laughed and told Kimmel he didn't need any help remembering. "I appreciate the reminder of how it went down," he said.

"Why is he so concerned with size — have you ever seen the president naked?" Kimmel asked. "I have not," Spicer replied, adding, "I think in all seriousness that, whether you voted for him or not, the president won the election, he faced a lot of headwinds and I think there was a faction of people out there that didn't want to give him the credit he deserved. I think a lot of times he takes that personally."

Kimmel pressed back on the inauguration debacle, in which photos clearly showed a marked difference between the crowd size for former president Barack Obama's inauguration and Trump's.

"Look, your job as press secretary is to represent the president's voice and to make sure you are articulating what his visions are on policy, on issues, and on other areas that he wants to articulate. Whether or not you agree, is not your job," he explained. "But ultimately he's the president, he decides and that's what you sign up to do."

And as for Spicer's comments "that we can disagree on the facts," (or as counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway would later call it, "alternative facts") he defended that, too. "I think you can look at a set of facts and come out with one opinion and someone else can say, 'While the facts are the same here, I come out with a different conclusion.' And that's what makes our country great," he said.

Read more: Kimmel Slams Cruz Over Porn "Like": He "Masturbates to Pictures of Poor People Without Health Care"

When asked if the inauguration comments might have gotten him "off to a bad start with the press corps," Spicer conceded that it probably was not the best start. 

Kimmel also brought up the president's penchant for tweeting, something Spicer also defended. "[Twitter] was one of the president's most effective tools on the campaign trail and he continues to utilize it, and you were constantly kept on your toes. And I will tell you, there is no one who is working harder than him when it comes to the hours of the day — he's up late, he's up early."

Circling back to the press and the idea of fake news, Kimmel asked if, after everything, Spicer would agree that most journalists are "decent people, looking to write the truth." To which Spicer agreed, saying, "I think probably the majority. There are a lot that would rather be first than right, and that's unfortunate because it gives a bad name to those who actually do take the time to do it right."

He said he found it frustrating when the press seemed to be "creating a story that didn't exist." Kimmel then challenged him on the idea of fake news, saying, "It seems that what the president calls fake news is anything that criticizes him, and then he'll give validity to wacky news sources sometimes because they're complimentary. Do you think that is a dangerous thing, to delegitimize the press?"

"I think it's a two-way street. When these guys in the press corps go after the president, from the outside it creates a very poor relationship overall and I think there are some areas that could deserve a reset," he said. "I believe a free press is paramount to a democracy and it's what makes our country great."

However, he said it bothered him that the press corps would "protect themselves" and "not call out someone who has crossed the line on a story."

"Lumping everyone together as fake news just seems terrible to me," Kimmel replied, equating the idea to people lumping "all priests together as child abusers."

"I agree, but if the press corps wants to attack Republicans, attack conservatives, undermine our attempt to have a constructive dialogue, it's a two-way street. If we don't want to lump every journalist into the same thing, then don't lump every Republican and every conservative into the same box," he replied to enthusiastic applause. 

As for his post-White House future, Spicer himself told THR that he's looking to capitalize on his name recognition, saying, "I've been humbled by the amount of interest, and now that I've completely left government, I'll be looking to engage in those discussions."

Spicer isn't the only ex-White House staff member to book appearances on late-night television. Former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci appeared on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert in August, which led to a Monday ratings high for the show.

Watch the clip below.

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