Florida couple takes in dozens of foster children during Hurricane Irma

A Florida couple made a shelter out of their home for more than 70 children who had nowhere to go during Hurricane Irma.

Marc Bell and his wife Jennifer, who live in Boca Raton, received a call Monday from SOS Children's Village Florida saying that they needed somewhere to place the children after they’d lost power in the foster care community.

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The Bells wasted no time helping out.

“I said, ‘Bring them here,’" Bell said. "They were hungry. They were tired. They lived in the gymnasium for a week. They hadn't showered for a week and you saw how excited they were."

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Residents return and evaluate homes after Hurricane Irma
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Residents return and evaluate homes after Hurricane Irma
MIAMI BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 12: Maria Soto and Michael Perez return home for the first time after seeking shelter in a friend's home when Hurricane Irma passed through the area on September 12, 2017 in Miami Beach, Florida. Florida took a direct hit from the Hurricane. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Stasia Walsh speaks in front of her partially damaged home at the Enchanted Shores manufactured home park in Naples, Florida, on September 11, 2017 after Hurricane Irma hit Florida. Walsh and her family rode out the storm in their home. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Don and Marie Larcom show the minor damage their home sustained at the Enchanted Shores manufactured home park in Naples, Florida, on September 11, 2017 after Hurricane Irma hit Florida. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Don and Marie Larcom put a bird feeder in front of their house at the Enchanted Shores manufactured home park in Naples, Florida, on September 11, 2017 after Hurricane Irma hit Florida. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Local residents walk along a destroyed trailer park after Hurricane Irma strikes Florida, in Plantation Key in the Florida Keys, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A resident tosses a piece of debris as she works to clear the street after Hurricane Irma passed through in St Marys, Georgia, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Keane
IMMOKALEE, FL -SEP 11: (L) Mario Valentine sits still stunned in his badly damaged home in Immokalee. At right is his daughter Maria, age 5 who is being told to watch her step by her uncle Jose Valentine. (that's the wife of Jose, Sandra Guzman in between them.) -The town of Immokalee, Florida was hit hard by Hurricane Irma. The community has many farm workers that live in poor living conditions and their homes seemed to be hit the hardest by the storm. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
FT LAUDERDALE - SEPTEMBER 11: Jennifer Polo and her dogs Maggi (L) and Betsy (R) are back home waiting for her roommate top open the door in Ft. Lauderdale, FL September 11, 2017. Polo said she evacuated north but ran out of gas en route and had to take a taxi back home to face the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. (Photo by Andrew Innerarity/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
A sign which reads "No Resident Entry" is seen at a check point as local residents try to enter areas of the Florida Keys after Hurricane Irma strikes Florida, in Islamorada Key, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Andres Delarosa is pictured inside his house, which was flooded after the passing of Hurricane Irma in Immokalee, Florida, U.S. September 12, 2017 REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Melissa Delarosa is pictured outside her house, which was flooded after the passing of Hurricane Irma in Immokalee, Florida, U.S. September 12, 2017 REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Sandra Guzman, left, with her daughter Maria Valentine Romero, right, and their friend Rosa Pulito, back, are pictured in front of Sandra's mobile home which was destroyed after the passing of Hurricane Irma in Immokalee, Florida, U.S. September 12, 2017 REUTERS/Stephen Yang
A resident collects personal belongings from his flooded home in Bonita Springs, Florida, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017. Hurricane Irma smashed into Southern Florida as a Category 4 storm, driving a wall of water and violent winds ashore and marking the first time since 1964 the U.S. was hit by back-to-back major hurricanes. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
BONITA SPRINGS, FL - SEPTEMBER 12: People climb over a wall to reach a community cut-off after wires and trees blocked the entrances two days after Hurricane Irma swept through the area on September 12, 2017 in Bonita Springs, Florida. Hurricane Irma made another landfall near Naples yesterday after inundating the Florida Keys. Electricity was out in much of the region with extensive flooding. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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The couple has pulled out all the stops to keep the children happy and occupied during the ultimate Irma sleepover, WPEC reported.

"We had manicures for the little girls," Marc Bell said. "We got Bobby the balloon guy coming later to entertain them. Yesterday during dinner, we had a singer come who plays guitar and sang songs with them."

The husband and wife said their decision to help the children was "a no-brainer."

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"They don't have a mom or a dad, so they're scared, and then their house parents, even though they're there for them, they're scared too,” Jennifer Bell said. “So to have these kids feel welcomed and to just feel comfortable, as a mom it just makes you feel like you're doing something good. It’s knowing that later on, these kids are going to look back and they're going to want to help someone else.”

SOS Children's Villages Florida, the foster care community the kids are from, is looking for donations to help get these kids back home.

For more information, click here.

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