Canadian judge suspended for wearing Trump 'MAGA' hat in court

A Canadian judge has been punished with a 30-day suspension for reportedly wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat on the bench the day after Donald Trump won the U.S. presidential election, notes CBC News.

According to the National Post, the Ontario Judicial Council panel recently ruled that Bernd Zabel, 69, would be formally reprimanded and suspended without pay, but he will not be fired. 

"Whatever Justice Zabel may have thought about the U.S. presidential election, and however serious his actions of Nov. 9, 2016, may have been, his record on the bench and his reputation with his judicial colleagues and the bar demonstrates that he is an entirely fair-minded and impartial judge who is dedicated to the highest ideals of his calling," the deciding panel has been quoted as saying about its decision.

RELATED: Variations on Trump's 'Make America Great Again' hats

13 PHOTOS
Variations on Trump's 'Make America Great Again' hats
See Gallery
Variations on Trump's 'Make America Great Again' hats

A woman smiles after getting an autograph by U.S. Republican presidential candidate and businessman Donald Trump on her hat after he spoke at a campaign rally South Point Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada January 21, 2016. REUTERS/David Becker

A delegate with gay rights hat attends the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Audience member Ana Gomez, wearing a cap reading "Immigrants Make America Great" in the style of hats worn by U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, greets U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during a campaign Voter Registration Rally at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida, United States September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Vendors sell hats outside a rally for U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Gaffney, South Carolina February 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Native American activists rally to call on President Barack Obama to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, in front of the White House in Washington, U.S. September 13, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
An attendee wears a "Make Donald Drumpf Again" hat during the "Politicon" convention in Pasadena, California, U.S. June 25, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
A man and child wear "Make America Great Again" hats as they wait for Republican nominee Donald Trump to speak at "Joni's Roast and Ride" in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., August 27, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump signs a hat at a campaign rally in West Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S., April 25, 2016. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter
A man wears a hat that says "Make America Gay Again," a parody of Donald Trump's campaign slogan while watching the San Francisco LGBT Pride Parade in San Francisco, California, U.S. June 26, 2016. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
A man holds a "Make America Great Again" hat as U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as he speaks during a campaign event at an airplane hanger in Rochester, New York April 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Supporters of Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump stand during a prayer before a rally with Trump at Clemson University's livestock arena in Pendleton, South Carolina February 10, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
The images of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (L) and Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump are seen painted on decorative pumpkins created by artist John Kettman in LaSalle, Illinois, U.S., June 8, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Nevertheless, the panel found that he had "violated the fundamental principle that the judiciary must remain above and removed from politics," notes the BBC.

Zabel’s Trump hat had been reported to the judicial council by dozens of public and legal observers, some of whom indicated a fear that his rulings would reflect biases expressed by the U.S. president. 

The judge has since acknowledged that he was wrong to wear the hat, even apologizing for the move—which he said was intended to be humorous—in court. 

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.