Brock Turner's image used to illustrate rape in college textbook

A criminal justice textbook has used an image of Brock Turner to illustrate an entry on rape.

Washington State University student Hannah Kendall Shuman shared a photo of the entry on Facebook last week, The Daily Dot reported.

The textbook, "Introduction to Criminal Justice," second edition, by Callie Marie Rennsion, shows the Stanford swimmer-turned sex-offender’s mugshot next to an entry that defines rape.

RELATED: Brock Turner sexual assault case

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Brock Turner, the former Stanford swimmer convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, leaves the Santa Clara County Jail in San Jose, California, U.S. September 2, 2016.

(REUTERS/Stephen Lam)

Former Stanford student Brock Turner who was sentenced to six months in county jail for the sexual assault of an unconscious and intoxicated woman is shown in this Santa Clara County Sheriff's booking photo taken January 18, 2015, and received June 7, 2016. Santa Clara County Sheriff's Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Brock Turner, the former Stanford swimmer convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, leaves the Santa Clara County Jail in San Jose, California, U.S. September 2, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Brock Turner, the former Stanford swimmer convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, leaves the Santa Clara County Jail in San Jose, California, U.S. September 2, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith speaks to members of the media prior to the release of Brock Turner, the former Stanford swimmer convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, at the Santa Clara County Jail in San Jose, California, U.S. September 2, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Brock Turner, the former Stanford swimmer convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, leaves the Santa Clara County Jail in San Jose, California, U.S. September 2, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Brock Turner, the former Stanford swimmer convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, leaves the Santa Clara County Jail in San Jose, California, U.S. September 2, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
An undated photo of Brock Allen Turner is shown in Ohio State General's office website. Courtesy Ohio Attorney General's Office/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Brock Turner, the former Stanford swimmer convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, leaves the Santa Clara County Jail in San Jose, California, U.S. September 2, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
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The caption reads: “Brock Turner, a Stanford student who raped and assaulted an unconscious female college student behind a dumpster at a fraternity party, was recently released from jail after serving only three months.”

The textbook addressed the outrage over his short prison sentence.

“Some are shocked at how short this sentence is,” the textbook continues. “Others who are more familiar with the way sexual violence has been handled in the criminal justice system are shocked that he was found guilty and served any time at all.”

Shuman celebrated Turner’s appearance in her textbook on Facebook.

“He may have been able to get out of prison time but in my Criminal Justice 101 textbook, Brock Turner is the definition of rape, so he’s got that goin for him,” she wrote.

The post had been shared more than 92,000 times as of Wednesday. Nearly 4,000 Facebook users had commented on the post.

“Public shame is the worst punishment,” one user wrote. “Naming and shaming in a textbook! Boy I can’t think of the worst punishment than that,” said another.

Shuman's post appeared more than a year after Turner was released from jail, where he served just half of a six-month sentence for sexual assault.

He is completing three years of probation following his jail sentence.

Turner’s soft sentence was handed down by Judge Aaron Persky. Critics have called for his removal from office.

Shuman said she was “surprised but very happy” to see Turner used as an example of how courts deal with rape.

“(My professor) has talked about the frighteningly low amounts of rape victims who actually see justice as well as the large amounts of male on woman violence that goes unseen or swept under the rug in America,” she told The Daily Dot.

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