Two-headed rattlesnake found by electrical worker is freaking people out

An electrical worker on a job near Jonesboro, Ark. made an unusual discovery earlier this week: he found a two-headed rattlesnake outside a home in Forrest City.

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A look at different types of snakes
UNSPECIFIED - MARCH 23: Close-up of a mountain kingsnake (Lampropeltis zonata) (Photo by De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - OCTOBER 28: Common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) on leaves, illustration (Photo by De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 15: Water Moccasin or Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus), Viperidae, drawing. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
Western rattlesnake strike ready
Emperor boa (Boa constrictor imperator) on a tree
Juvenile Emerald Tree Boa (Corallus caninus) Ready to Strike (the underside scales visible)
Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon Contortrix Contortrix) slithering through the green grass.
The eastern indigo snake is a large nonvenomous snake native to the Eastern United States.
close up of rare white albino monocled cobra
King Cobra on brown sand.
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The man, identified by Arkansas Online as Woodruff Electric employee Rodney Kelso, said he found the snake “sunning itself” outside a home. The 11-inch timber rattlesnake was found off Arkansas Highway 284 with two other snakes that appeared normal-looking, KFSM reported.

Kelso donned a pair of gloves after finding the two-headed serpent and put it in a box to bring to Forrest L. Wood Crowley’s Ridge Nature Center in Jonesboro, Fox13Memphis reported.

Kelso, operations director at Woodruff Electric, told Arkansas Online that he has never seen anything like the snake in his 50 years in the area.

“It does happen from time to time in nature,” Cody Walker, education program specialist at the nature center, told Arkansas Online. “Usually they die from complications.”

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