Clinton says the personal emails were her 'most important mistake'

Hillary Clinton has cited her personal emails as being a significant reason for her downfall in the 2016 presidential election. 

In an interview with ‘CBS Sunday Morning,’ she told host Jane Pauley, “Oh I think the most important of the mistakes I made was using personal email." 

Clinton also noted that then-FBI Director James Comey’s late October announcement that another potential trove of unsecured messages had surfaced, “just stopped" her momentum.

RELATED: A look at the disarray of Clinton's election night party

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Clinton supporters are fleeing her election night party in tears

A supporter of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton watches and waits at her election night rally in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016.

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Supporters of U.S Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton react as a state is called in favour of her opponent, Republican candidate Donald Trump, during a watch party for the U.S. Presidential election, at the University of Sydney in Australia, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Reed

A supporter of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton watches and waits at her election night rally in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016.

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Musician Lagy Gaga sits in her car after staging a protest against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump outside Trump Tower in New York City after midnight on election day November 9, 2016. Donald Trump stunned America and the world, riding a wave of populist resentment to defeat Hillary Clinton in the race to become the 45th president of the United States. The Republican mogul defeated his Democratic rival, plunging global markets into turmoil and casting the long-standing global political order, which hinges on Washington's leadership, into doubt.

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A supporter uses his smartphone as others leave Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

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Supporters of Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton react at the election night rally in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

A person talks on the phone at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 9, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States.

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At attendee reacts while kneeling on the floor during an election night party for 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton at the Javits Center in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. 

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An attendee reacts while sitting on the floor during an election night party for 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton at the Javits Center in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.

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A supporter of U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton reacts at her election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A supporter of U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton reacts at her election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
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The topic is one Clinton broaches in her new book ‘What Happened.’

According to the New York Times, she writes, “My first instinct was that my campaign should hit back and explain that Mr. Comey had badly overstepped his bounds,” but says her advisers convinced her “to just let it go and try to move on.” 

“Looking back that was a mistake," Clinton says.

The issue of her emails has proven to be enduring one.

SEE ALSO: Report: Jeff Sessions mulling using lie detectors to root out leaks

Politico notes that less than two weeks ago, Senate Judiciary Committee members Lindsey Graham and Chuck Grassley wrote a letter to the FBI regarding reports that Comey had “started drafting a statement clearing Clinton of charges in the case before she was interviewed by the FBI.”

Not long after news of the Senators’ letter surfaced, President Trump tweeted, “Wow, looks like James Comey exonerated Hillary Clinton long before the investigation was over…and so much more. A rigged system!” 

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