Massive WWII bomb defused in Frankfurt

FRANKFURT, Sept 3 (Reuters) - German explosives experts defused a massive World War II bomb in the financial capital of Frankfurt on Sunday after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes.

About 60,000 people were ordered to leave in what was Germany's biggest evacuation since the war, with more than a thousand emergency service workers helping to clear the area around the bomb, which was discovered on a building site last week.

More than 2,000 tonnes of live bombs and munitions are found each year in Germany, even under buildings.

British and American warplanes pummeled the country with 1.5 million tonnes of bombs that killed 600,000 people. Officials estimate that 15 percent of the bombs failed to explode, some burrowing six meters deep.

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Massive WWII bomb defused in Frankfurt

Explosives experts defused a massive World War Two bomb after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017.

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

Children's nurse Brigitte Neuenfeldt prepares a three-days-old baby from the neonatology station of the Buergerhospital clinic to be moved to another hospital on September 2, 2017 in Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, as evacuation measures are under way due to the found of a British WWII bomb. The disposal of the British WWII bomb that is planned for Sunday, September 3, 2017 requires the evacuation of up to 70,000 people.

(FRANK RUMPENHORST/AFP/Getty Images)

Bomb disposal expert Rene Bennert and Dieter Schweizler speak next to defused massive World War Two bomb after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017.

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

A heavy armed police truck is seen during the evacuation of approximately 60,000 people prior to the defusing of an unexploded World War II bomb on September 3, 2017 in Frankfurt, Germany. The bomb, type HC 4000 and used by the Allies in their bombing campaign of Nazi Germany, is two meters long and contains 1.4 tons of explosives. Authorities discovered the bomb near a university campus in the city center. The discovery of unexploded bombs from World War II is a common occurrence in Germany, especially in large urban centers. 

(Photo by Alexander Scheuber/Getty Images)

Explosives experts defused a massive World War Two bomb after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

Police and fire officers take precautions during the evacuation of approximately 60,000 people prior to the defusing of an unexploded World War II bomb on September 3, 2017 in Frankfurt, Germany. The bomb, type HC 4000 and used by the Allies in their bombing campaign of Nazi Germany, is two meters long and contains 1.4 tons of explosives. Authorities discovered the bomb near a university campus in the city center. The discovery of unexploded bombs from World War II is a common occurrence in Germany, especially in large urban centers.

(Photo by Alexander Scheuber/Getty Images)

A general view of the area where a British World War Two bomb was found and defused in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

Elderly people from a senior care facility wait to board a bus as part of the evacuation of approximately 60,000 people prior to the defusing of an unexploded World War II bomb on September 3, 2017 in Frankfurt, Germany. The bomb, type HC 4000 and used by the Allies in their bombing campaign of Nazi Germany, is two meters long and contains 1.4 tons of explosives. Authorities discovered the bomb near a university campus in the city center. The discovery of unexploded bombs from World War II is a common occurrence in Germany, especially in large urban centers. 

(Photo by Alexander Scheuber/Getty Images)

A bomb disposal expert Rene Bennert defused massive World War Two bomb after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

Police officer on motorbikes watch the Truck with the defused World War II bomb in Frankfurt, Germany, on September 03, 2017. More than 60,000 people was evacuated from the center of Frankfurt on Sunday after a 1.4-ton World War II bomb (HC 4000 air mine) was discovered on a construction site close to the Goethe University Frankfurt compound last Tuesday.

(THOMAS LOHNES/AFP/Getty Images)

A bomb disposal expert Rene Bennert speaks next to defused massive World War Two bomb after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

A man rests on a bench in an exhibition hall serving as a shelter as evacuation measures are under way in Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, on September 3, 2017. More than 60,000 people were set to be evacuated from Frankfurt's Westend district after a British World War II bomb (HC 4000 air mine) was discovered on a construction site close to the Goethe University compound last Tuesday, August 29, 2017. The operation to defuse the bomb is expected to begin at 12.00 am and to take approximately four hours.

(THOMAS LOHNES/AFP/Getty Images)

A general view of the area where a British World War Two bomb was found and defused in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017.

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

Residents are seen at Messe Frankfurt, one of the collection points during an evacuation of approximately 60,000 people prior to the defusing of an unexploded World War II bomb on September 3, 2017 in Frankfurt, Germany. The bomb, type HC 4000 and used by the Allies in their bombing campaign of Nazi Germany, is two meters long and contains 1.4 tons of explosives. Authorities discovered the bomb near a university campus in the city center. The discovery of unexploded bombs from World War II is a common occurrence in Germany, especially in large urban centers.

(Photo by Alexander Scheuber/Getty Images)

Bomb disposal experts Rene Bennert and Dieter Schweizler speak next to defused massive World War Two bomb after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

Bomb disposal experts Rene Bennert and Dieter Schweizler speak to journalists next to defused massive World War Two bomb after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

People wait in an exhibition hall serving as a shelter as evacuation measures are under way in Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, on September 3, 2017. More than 60,000 people were set to be evacuated from Frankfurt's Westend district after a British World War II bomb (HC 4000 air mine) was discovered on a construction site close to the Goethe University compound last Tuesday, August 29, 2017. The operation to defuse the bomb is expected to begin at 12.00 am and to take approximately four hours.

(THOMAS LOHNES/AFP/Getty Images)

Explosives experts defused a massive World War Two bomb after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

A resident is seen at Messe Frankfurt during an evacuation of approximately 60,000 people prior to the defusing of an unexploded World War II bomb on September 3, 2017 in Frankfurt, Germany. The bomb, type HC 4000 and used by the Allies in their bombing campaign of Nazi Germany, is two meters long and contains 1.4 tons of explosives. Authorities discovered the bomb near a university campus in the city center. The discovery of unexploded bombs from World War II is a common occurrence in Germany, especially in large urban centers. 

(Photo by Alexander Scheuber/Getty Images)

Bomb disposal experts Rene Bennert and Dieter Schweizler speak next to defused massive World War Two bomb after tens of thousands of people evacuated their homes in Frankfurt, Germany, September 3, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach)

Ella Wichmann pushes suitcases as she leaves her apartment in the evacuation area as evacuation measures are under way in Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, on September 3, 2017. More than 60,000 people are set to be evacuated from Frankfurt's Westend district after a British World War II bomb (HC 4000 air mine) was discovered on a construction site close to the Goethe University compound last Tuesday, August 29, 2017. The operation to defuse the bomb is expected to begin at 12.00 am and to take approximately four hours.

(THOMAS LOHNES/AFP/Getty Images)

Police officers check for remaining residents during the evacuation of approximately 60,000 people prior to the defusing of an unexploded World War II bomb on September 3, 2017 in Frankfurt, Germany. The bomb, type HC 4000 and used by the Allies in their bombing campaign of Nazi Germany, is two meters long and contains 1.4 tons of explosives. Authorities discovered the bomb near a university campus in the city center. The discovery of unexploded bombs from World War II is a common occurrence in Germany, especially in large urban centers.

 (Photo by Alexander Scheuber/Getty Images)

The defused World War II bomb is pictured in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, on September 03, 2017. More than 60,000 people was evacuated from the center of Frankfurt on Sunday after a 1.4-ton World War II bomb (HC 4000 air mine) was discovered on a construction site close to the Goethe University Frankfurt compound last Tuesday.

(THOMAS LOHNES/AFP/Getty Images)

Operations managers and helpers work in front of the Buergerhospital clinic, from where patients are being moved to another hospital on September 2, 2017 in Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, as evacuation measures are under way due to the found of a British WWII bomb. The disposal of the British WWII bomb that is planned for Sunday, September 3, 2017 requires the evacuation of up to 70,000 people.

(FRANK RUMPENHORST/AFP/Getty Images)

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(Writing by Emma Thomasson; Editing by David Goodman)

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