Parts of King Henry VIII and Elizabeth I's birthplace uncovered

The birthplace of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I has been uncovered by archaeologists in London.

Fox News says that the remains of Greenwich Palace were discovered under the floor of the Old Royal Naval College.

The Director of Conservation at the college says the find is a “highly significant discovery” and hopes it will offer valuable information into the workings of the palace. 

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King Henry VIII
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King Henry VIII
Henry Viii, 1491 Â 1547. King Of England. From The Historic Gallery Of Portraits And Paintings, Published 1808. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Henry Viii, 1491 Â 1547. King Of England And Ireland. From The History Of England Published 1859. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Great Seal Of King Henry Viii Of England Affixed To The Treaty Of Alliance Of 1527 Between King Henry Viii And King Francis I Of France Against King Charles V Of Spain. From L'univers Illustre Published In Paris In 1868. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Plan Of Principal Floor Of Hampton Court Palace As It Was During Reign Of King Henry Viii. From History Of Hampton Court Palace In Tudor Times By Ernest Law. Published London 1885. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Henry Viii, 1491 Â 1547. King Of England. After The Portrait Of Henry At Forty-Five Years Of Age By Joos Van Cleve. From History Of Hampton Court Palace In Tudor Times By Ernest Law. Published London 1885. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Henry Viii, 1491 To 1547. King Of England. From The Book Short History Of The English People By J.R. Green, Published London 1893. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Henry VIII, King of England and Ireland, c1520. Henry (1491-1547) reigned from 1509 until 1547. Anonymous portrait. From the National Portrait Gallery, London. (Photo by Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images)
'Arrest and Execution of Thomas More Chancellor to Henry VIII of England' c1541-1599. Henry VIII (1491-1547), dressed in red, rides through the archway on the left. In the right foreground is a dog, representing faithfulness. English statesman, scholar, saint and martyr Thomas More (1478-1535) opposed Henry's divorce from Catherine of Aragon, for which he was executed. (Photo by Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images)
'King Henry VIII', 1542-1550. Henry (1491-1547) succeeded his father, Henry VII, in 1509. Obsessed with passing the throne on to a male heir, he had six wives in the course of his reign, none of whom provided him with a son who survived. In divorcing his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, in 1533, Henry severed the English church from Rome. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
'Henry VIII', c1517-1540. From the collection at Windsor Castle. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Inside the Great Court, Trinity College, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire. The largest of Cambridge University's colleges, Trinity was founded by Henry VIII in 1546. The Great Court, reputed to be the largest enclosed court in Europe, was completed in the early 17th century by Thomas Nevile, Master of the College. Sir Isaac Newton was an alumnus of Trinity, together with no less than 31 Nobel Prize winners. (Photo by Peter Thompson/Heritage Images/Getty Images)
(GERMANY OUT) Henry VIII. (Tudor)1491.1547King of england 1491-1547contemp. portrait (drawing) (Photo by Lombard/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
Henry VIII (28 June 1491 Â 28 January 1547) was king of England from 21 April 1509 until his death, He was lord, and later king, of Ireland. studio of Hans Holbein, Warwick castle (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
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It was demolished at the end of the 17th century and became the Royal Hospital for Seamen which later became the Royal Naval College. 

Since nothing from the above ground sections of the palace survived, the newly discovered underground section gives us a look at the life of the Tudor court. 

Experts say that the old palace would have been comparable to the still standing Hampton Court Palace in its palace complex formation. 

The Chief executive of Historic England says “to find a trace of Greenwich Palace, arguably the most important of all the Tudor palaces is hugely exciting.”

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