Trump received a Super Bowl ring from Patriots owner Robert Kraft as a gift

When the New England Patriots visited the White House in April to celebrate their Super Bowl LI victory, President Donald Trump received more than just a personalized jersey. He also received his own Super Bowl ring.

The team confirmed to Comcast Sportsnet New England that Patriots owner Robert Kraft did indeed present the president with his own Super Bowl ring as a special gift from the first team to visit the White House during his presidency.

News of the Trump ring was first mentioned by former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci. A conversation he had on Twitter led some to believe that Kraft had given his personal Super Bowl ring to Trump.

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WASHINGTON, USA - APRIL 19: U.S. President Donald Trump congratulates the 2017 Super Bowl Champions the New England Patriots at the White House in Washington, United States on April 19, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - APRIL 19: U.S. President Donald Trump (C) poses for a photo with the 2017 Super Bowl Champions the New England Patriots at the White House in Washington, United States on April 19, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 19: U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks while hosting the New England Patriots and team owner Robert Kraft during a celebration of the team's Super Bowl victory on the South Lawn at the White House April 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. It was the team's fifth Super Bowl victory since 1960. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 19: New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft (C) is congratulated by U.S. President Donald Trump during an event celebrating the team's Super Bowl win on the South Lawn at the White House April 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. It was the team's fifth Super Bowl victory since 1960. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON D.C. - APRIL 19: President Donald Trump holds a New England Patriots helmet as Patriots head coach Bill Belichick, left, and Patriots player Julian Edelman, rear, look on during a ceremony at the White House in Washington D.C. on Apr. 19,. 2017. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - APRIL 19: U.S. President Donald Trump (C) holds up a customized jersey presented to him by 2017 Super Bowl Champions the New England Patriots during their visit to the White House in Washington, United States on April 19, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON D.C. - APRIL 19: A staff member sprays Windex on the New England Patriots' five Super Bowl trophies as they sit on a podium on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington D.C., where the Patriots are guests for a ceremony with President Donald Trump on Apr. 19, 2017. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 19: New England Patriots listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a ceremony where he honored the Super Bowl Champion New England Patriots for their Super Bowl LI victory on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC on Wednesday, April 19, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 19: President Donald Trump speaks during a ceremony where he honored the Super Bowl Champion New England Patriots for their Super Bowl LI victory on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC on Wednesday, April 19, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 19: U.S. President Donald Trump poses for photographs with the New England Patriots during a celebration of the team's Super Bowl victory on the South Lawn at the White House April 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. It was the team's fifth Super Bowl victory since 1960. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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The team clarified to CSNNE that it was not Kraft's own ring.

According to CSNNE, Trump "hoped to put the ring on display."

Trump is allowed to keep the ring, according to NBC News. A president is allowed to keep gifts from "the American public," but must file a financial disclosure report when the gift exceeds a value of $350, as a means "to show transparency."

It is unknown how much the Patriots paid for Trump's new bling, but their 2015 Super Bowl rings cost $36,500 each.

Trump is the second head of state to own a Pats Super Bowl ring as both he and Russian President Vladimir Putin both have their own. However, in the case of Putin, he did actually acquire Kraft's own ring from the Patriots' third Super Bowl win in 2004, and he came about the ring through a misunderstanding.

Kraft explained the situation to NFL.com:

"[The Super Bowl rings] are all in a drawer except for my third one. The original is in Russia with the president of the country. I happened to be there on a business mission with my friend Sandy Weill. We had just given out our rings. I showed Sandy my ring, and he said, 'Why don't you show it to the president?' And I showed it to him and he put it on, and he sort of just enjoyed it, so he kept it on."

In another interview, Kraft had a more colorful description of the exchange, saying: "I took out the ring and showed it to [Putin], and he put it on and he goes, 'I can kill someone with this ring.' I put my hand out and he put it in his pocket, and three KGB guys got around him and walked out."

As Scaramucci mentioned above, the ring was never returned to Kraft, and it sounds like there is little hope it ever will.

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