Trump starts day by retweeting conservative commentators who blasted antifa and Obama to defend him on Charlottesville and Arpaio pardon

President Donald Trump began his Monday by retweeting a pair of conservative commentators who blasted "antifa" and former President Barack Obama to help defend the president's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia and his pardon of Joe Arpaio, a former Arizona sheriff.

Trump initially retweeted conservative author Dinesh D'Souza, author of books such as "Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party" and "The Big Lie: Exposing the Nazi Roots of the American Left," who had quote-tweeted a Washington Post article with the headline "Black-clad antifa attack peaceful right wing demonstrators in Berkeley."

RELATED: Joe Arpaio through the years

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Joe Arpaio through the years
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Joe Arpaio through the years
Joe Arpaio, sheriff of Maricopa County, in Arizona, and called 'America's Toughest Sheriff', had the controversial idea to set-up a 'Tent City' as an extension of the Maricopa County Jail. (Photo by Andrew Lichtenstein/Sygma via Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - MAY 28: Prisoners dressed in stripped inmate informs walk under the hot Arizona sun at tent city jail opened near Phoenix by the Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio. Arpaio claims to be 'the toughest Sheriff in the United States.' (Photo credit should read JEAN-LOUP SENSE/AFP/Getty Images)
Teenage inmates inside a tent at the Maricopa County 'Pup Tent City' jail complex for juveniles in Phoenix December 23, 1998. Pup Tents is the third in a series of controversial Tent Cities that Sheriff Joe Arpaio has opened since 1993, all in an effort to ease jail overcrowding, provide more jail space for arrestees and save taxpayers millions of dollars. Males were introduced to Tent City in 1993, and convicted females went into Tents in 1995. The entire complex today houses about 1,400 convicted males and females. (photo by Mike Fiala)
PHOENIX - JULY 8: Barney, a three year old St. Bernard, stares out at inmates who have stopped by his cell for a visit at the jail's fourth floor Maricopa Animal Safe Hospice (MASH) July 8, 2005 in Phoenix, Arizona. 17 female inmates, whom volunteer and go through a formal interview process for the privileged duty of caring for the animals, care for 20 dogs and 31 cats in the five year old program started by Sheriff Joe Arpaio. The inmates have two days removed from their jail sentence for each day worked in the unit. The program takes in animals that have been abused, abandoned or are evidence in a criminal case and keeps them until they are adopted. Inmates feed, clean, groom and provide obedience lessons for the 587 animals (dogs, cats, birds, horses) that have gone through the hospice since it began. (Photo by Jeff Topping/Getty Images)
[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] Joe Arpaio, 'America's Toughest Sheriff' at the annual Fiesta del Sol parade in Phoenix.
PHOENIX - FEBRUARY 11: Maricopa County Sheriff Officer Joe Arpaio speaks during a news conference regarding an immigration raid his officers conducted at HMI Contracting February 11, 2009 in Phoenix, Arizona. Several undocumented workers were arrested after Arpaio ordered the raid on the company, which has a contract with the County Board of Supervisors to do landscaping at county buildings. (Photo by Joshua Lott/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 17: Inmates walk as they are moved after being ordered by Maricopa County Sheriff Officer Joe Arpaio (R), looking on, to be placed into new housing to open up new beds for maximum security inmates on April 17, 2009 in Phoenix, Arizona. Arpaio has been facing criticism from Hispanic activists and lawmakers, alleging that Arpaio's crackdown methods on illegal immigrants involve racial profiling. (Photo by Joshua Lott/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 17: Inmates walk as they are moved after being ordered by Maricopa County Sheriff Officer Joe Arpaio to be placed into new housing to open up new beds for maximum security inmates on April 17, 2009 in Phoenix, Arizona. Arpaio has been facing criticism from Hispanic activists and lawmakers, alleging that Arpaio's crackdown methods on illegal immigrants involve racial profiling. (Photo by Joshua Lott/Getty Images)
PHOENIX - APRIL 29: Maricopa County sheriff Joe Arpaio speaks to participants of the Border Security Expo on April 29, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona. Arpaio, promoted by his supporters as 'America's Toughest Sheriff', voiced his support for Arizona's new immigration enforcement law. His deputies conduct frequent sweeps to arrest undocumented immigrants in his county, which includes the state capitol Phoenix. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 17: Maricopa County Sheriff Officer Joe Arpaio's name plate and business cards sit on his desk at his office on April 17, 2009 in Phoenix, Arizona. Arpaio has been facing criticism from Hispanic activists and lawmakers, alleging that Arpaio's crackdown methods on illegal immigrants involve racial profiling. (Photo by Joshua Lott/Getty Images)
PHOENIX - APRIL 30: Undocumented immigrant Jose Hechavaria (R), 43, stands with fellow prisoners in the yard of the Maricopa County Tent City Jail on April 30, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona. Hechavaria, a 13-year resident of Arizona, said he was arrested by sheriff's deputies on a DUI charge and then held because of his illegal immigration statues. Some 200 undocumented immigrants are currently serving time in the facility. The controversial jail is run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who has been an outspoken critic of illegal immigration and a supporter of Arizona's new tough immigration law. Prisoners at the facility are fed twice a day, sleep in non-airconditioned tents and are issued striped prison uniforms and pink underwear and socks. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio speaks with a reporter outside his famous tent city jail for misdemeanor offenses May 3, 2010. A few hours later he officially announced he would not be running for Arizona Governor saying, I have come so far and accomplished so much in the past 18 years as Sheriff that to leave now just doesn�t make sense,� said Arpaio. 'Right now, we are standing in the cross-hairs of history in this state and as Sheriff of the most populous county in Arizona, there is much work yet to do.' AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Maricopa Country Detention Officer Rene Ansley holds up one of the pink boxer style underware male inmates wear inside Sheriff Joe Arpaio's tent city jail May 3, 2010, in Phoenix, Arizona. The inmates also have matching pink socks. This area of the tent city houses misdemeanor offenders. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
RANCHO BERNARDO, CA - AUGUST 10: Sheriff Joe Arpaio speaks during a visit to the Rancho Bernardo Inn on August 10, 2010 in Rancho Bernardo, California. Arpaio, who is Sheriff of Maricopa County in Arizona, gained national attention for using deputies to conduct raids to apprehend illegal immigrants and building large outdoor prison tents to house inmates. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS - OCTOBER 19: Maricopa County, Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio speaks at a Tea Party Express rally at Stoney's Rockin' Country October 19, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The tour, part of an initiative to get conservatives elected to the House and Senate, will move across country and conclude on November 1, 2010 in Concord, New Hampshire the day before the contentious mid-term elections (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
CRESTON, IA - DECEMBER 27: Texas governor and Republican candidate for president Rick Perry (C) walks with Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio (L) before a campaign stop at Adams Street Espresso on December 27, 2011 in Creston, Iowa. With one week to go before the Iowa caucuses, Rick Perry continues his bus tour through Iowa. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: Immigrant inmates line up for breakfast at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. Striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: Immigrant inmates walk for excercise at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - JUNE 3: Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio salutes Muhannad Al Kusairy during a meeting at his office in Phoenix, Arizona on Monday, June 3, 2013. Al Kusairy is hoping to taking steps to become a Maricopa County Deputy Sheriff once he becomes a citizen. (Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
MARSHALLTOWN, IA - JANUARY 26: Sheriff Joe Arpaio (L) of Maricopa County, Arizona listens as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to the press prior to a rally on January 26, 2016 in Marshalltown, Iowa. Arpaio today announced his support for Trump's presidential bid. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 19: Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio is surrounded by protesters and members of the media at the the site of the Republican National Convention (RNC) in downtown Cleveland on the second day of the convention on July 19, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. Many people have stayed away from downtown due to road closures and the fear of violence. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicked off on July 18. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 21: Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio gestures to the crowd while delivering a speech on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicked off on July 18. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 21: Sheriff Joe Arpaio exits the stage after delivering a speech at the Republican National Convention on Thursday, July 21, 2016. (Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 19: Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio takes part in the convention openings on the second day of the Republican National Convention on July 19, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicked off on July 18. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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"Finally, as if by accident, the @washingtonpost breaks down & admits the truth about where the violence is coming from," D'Souza wrote.

The Post story was a report on a large group of "anti-fascists" barreling into a Sunday protest in Berkeley, California, and committing acts of violence on right-wing protesters.

The Post wrote:

A pepper-spray wielding Trump supporter was smacked to the ground with homemade shields. Another was attacked by five black-clad antifas, each windmilling kicks and punches into a man desperately trying to protect himself. A conservative group leader retreated for safety behind a line of riot police as marchers chucked water bottles, shot off pepper spray and screamed "fascist go home!"

All told, the Associated Press reported at least five individuals were attacked. An AP reporter witnessed the assaults. Berkeley Police’s Lt. Joe Okies told The Washington Post the rally resulted in "13 arrests on a range of charges including assault with a deadly weapon, obstructing a police officer, and various Berkeley municipal code violations."

The protest was one of many that have sprouted in the aftermath of Charlottesville, where a white supremacist mowed down a large group of counterprotesters with his car, killing one person and injuring roughly 20 more. The Charlottesville protests began with white nationalists rallying against the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Trump's response to that incident was widely panned by both the left and the right as inadequate.

RELATED: Chaos erupts at canceled Berekely rally

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Clashes at canceled 'No Marxism' rally at Berkeley
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Clashes at canceled 'No Marxism' rally at Berkeley
A photographer is being attacked by a masked demonstrator in Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park during a cancelled No Marxism in America rally and counter-protest in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
A photographer is being attacked by masked demonstrators in Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park during a cancelled No Marxism in America rally and counter-protest in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
People come to aid a photographer (C) as he is being attacked by masked demonstrators during a cancelled No Marxism in America rally and counter-protest in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Police officers help an injured man after he was attacked by masked demonstrators in Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park during a cancelled No Marxism in America rally and counter-protest in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Masked counter-demonstrators carry a banner as they climb over concrete barriers into Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park against the cancelled No Marxism in America rally in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Counter protesters rally at a cancelled No Marxism in America event in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Kate Munsch
A counter protester hangs a banner at a cancelled No Marxism in America event in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Kate Munsch
A police officer orders a group of counter-demonstrators to move as they escort demonstrators aligned with U.S. President Donald Trump to safety at the cancelled No Marxism in America rally in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Masked counter-demonstrators gather against the cancelled No Marxism in America rally in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Police officers detain a dog belonged to a detained demonstrator at the cancelled No Marxism in America rally and counter-demonstration in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
A man is being doused with liquid while being chased away by counter-demonstrators at the cancelled No Marxism in America rally in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
A counter protester is detained at a cancelled No Marxism in America event in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Kate Munsch TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Sam Hyde, a supporter of U.S. President Donald Trump (C), is being surrounded by counter-demonstrators during the cancelled No Marxism in America rally in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Demonstrators gather at the Bay Area Rally Against Hate counter-protest against the cancelled No Marxism in America rally in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Demonstrators hold signs during the Bay Area Rally Against Hate counter-protest against the cancelled No Marxism in America rally in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Counter protesters rally at a cancelled No Marxism in America event in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Kate Munsch
Counter protesters rally at a cancelled No Marxism in America event in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Kate Munsch
Demonstrators gather at the Bay Area Rally Against Hate counter-protest against the cancelled No Marxism in America rally in Berkeley, California, U.S. August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Arthur Schaper, a supporter of U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks with counter-demonstrators in Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park ahead of a cancelled No Marxism in America event in Berkeley, California, U.S., August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
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Trump initially blamed "many sides" for the violence before condemning the racist movements that gathered. But during a press conference at Trump Tower later that week that was supposed to focus on infrastructure, Trump reverted to his earlier position, claiming that the "alt-left" was at least partially responsible for the violence as well and wondering whether the counterprotesters have any "semblance of guilt."

The president followed up his retweet of D'Souza by retweeting conservative commentator Katie Pavlich, who quote-tweeted former Obama foreign policy adviser Ben Rhodes. Rhodes had blasted Trump for his Friday pardon of Arpaio, the former Maricopa County sheriff who was convicted criminal contempt for ignoring a court order to stop racial profiling of Latinos.

"Obama used his pardon and commutation power to give a second chance to people who deserved empathy, not racists who showed none," Rhodes wrote.

Pavlich fired back.

"Your boss pardoned a traitor who gave U.S. enemies state secrets, he also pardoned a terrorist who killed Americans," she wrote. "Spare us the lecture."

Pavlich appeared to be first referencing Chelsea Manning, the former Army soldier who disclosed confidential information to WikiLeaks. Manning served seven years in federal prison before Obama commuted her sentence shortly before his time in office was complete. The "terrorist" Pavlich referenced was likely Oscar Lopez Rivera, a Puerto Rican militant who served 35 years of a 55-year sentence for "seditious conspiracy" before Obama commuted the sentence of the 74-year-old right before the conclusion of his presidency.

Trump's Friday night pardon of Arpaio was met with widespread ridicule on both sides of the aisle.

Arpaio became a notorious figure over the more than two decades he spent leading the sheriff's office. Perhaps what he is best known for was keeping inmates in a "tent city" jail under inhumane conditions. He himself once called the sweltering open-air facility a "concentration camp."

An outspoken Trump supporter, Arpaio was one of the leading figures of the "birther" movement, which sought to discredit Obama by claiming he was not born in this country.

The Post reported this weekend that Trump apparently asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions whether dropping the case against Arpaio was a possibility, to which Sessions said it would be inappropriate. He did say then, though, that a pardon could be granted upon Arpaio's conviction, a move that Trump was reportedly "gung-ho" about.

Trump added in another Monday-morning retweet shortly after, promoting a tweet from an inspirational quotes account.

"No color, no religion, no nationality should come between us, we are all children of God. - Mother Teresa," the tweet read.

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