Eye care experts warn signs of potential eye damage after looking at the solar eclipse

It's been widely reported by now that Monday's total solar eclipse could cause eye damage to people who viewed it without proper protection.

And if history is any indication, many have likely already looked right into the celestial phenomenon without taking the proper precautions, which can lead to severe, permanent damage to their eyes.

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Total solar eclipse 2017
A multiple exposure image shows the solar eclipse as it creates the effect of a diamond ring at totality as seen from Clingmans Dome, which at 6,643 feet (2,025m) is the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 35�33'24" N, 83�29'46" W. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People watch the solar eclipse during the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience at Madras High School in Madras, Oregon, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 44�37?50? N 121�7?15? W. REUTERS/Jason Redmond
ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21: In this NASA handout, The Moon is seen as it starts passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse August 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21: In this NASA handout, the Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse from August 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
The moon is seen passing in front of the sun during a solar eclipse from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington, U.S., August 21, 2017. Courtesy Bill Ingalls/NASA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. MANDATORY CREDIT
HOPKINSVILLE, KY - AUGUST 20: Ally Pyle, 3, of Hopkinsville traced her finger along the sign marking the point of greatest eclipse, the night before the solar eclipse, Aug. 20, 2017. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Solar Eclipse in Depoe Bay, Oregon, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 44�48'35" N 124�3'43" W. REUTERS/Mike Blake
View of a partial solar eclipse as seen from the esplanade of the Museum of Natural History in Mexico City, on August 21, 2017. In Mexico, where there was a partial eclipse, astronomy buffs set up telescopes fitted with special sun filters in parks and squares in various cities. / AFP PHOTO / PEDRO PARDO (Photo credit should read PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images)
View of a partial solar eclipse as seen from the esplanade of the Museum of Natural History in Mexico City, on August 21, 2017. In Mexico, where there was a partial eclipse, astronomy buffs set up telescopes fitted with special sun filters in parks and squares in various cities. / AFP PHOTO / YURI CORTEZ (Photo credit should read YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
SALEM, OR - AUGUST 21, 2017: A full solar eclipse as seen in Salem, Ore., on Aug. 21, 2017. (Photo by Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
People watch the start of the solar eclipse and raise their hands in prayer in an eclipse viewing event led by Native American elders, at Big Summit Prairie ranch in Oregon's Ochoco National Forest near the city of Mitchell on August 21, 2017. The Sun started to vanish behind the Moon as the partial phase of the so-called Great American Eclipse began Monday, with millions of eager sky-gazers soon to witness 'totality' across the nation for the first time in nearly a century. / AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
The 'Bailey's Beads' effect is seen during a total solar eclipse viewed from the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience on August 21, 2017 in Madras, Oregon. Emotional sky-gazers on the US West Coast cheered and applauded Monday as the Sun briefly vanished behind the Moon -- a rare total solar eclipse that will stretch across North America for the first time in nearly a century. / AFP PHOTO / STAN HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
Steve Kaltenhauser of Calgary, Canada, watches with the crowd during a total solar eclipse from the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience on August 21, 2017 in Madras, Oregon. Emotional sky-gazers on the US West Coast cheered and applauded Monday as the Sun briefly vanished behind the Moon -- a rare total solar eclipse that will stretch across North America for the first time in nearly a century. / AFP PHOTO / STAN HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
JACKSON, WY - AUGUST 21: The sun is is in full eclipse over Grand Teton National Park on August 21, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyoming. Thousands of people have flocked to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse on Monday August 21, 2017. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
The moon is seen passing in front of the sun during a solar eclipse from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington, U.S., August 21, 2017. Courtesy Bill Ingalls/NASA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. MANDATORY CREDIT
A jet plane flies by the total solar eclipse in Guernsey, Wyoming U.S. August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
U.S. President Donald Trump watches the solar eclipse from the Truman Balcony at the White House in Washington, U.S., August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
The International Space Station, in silhouette, as it transits the sun during a partial solar eclipse seen from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington, U.S., August 21, 2017. Courtesy Bill Ingalls/NASA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. MANDATORY CREDIT
CASPER, WY - AUGUST 21: A near total eclipse is seen from South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the 'path of totality' in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
NASHVILLE, TN - AUGUST 21: Holiday Inn hosts an Eclipse viewing party with Scholastic as part of the culmination event to the 'Summer of Smiles' program on August 21, 2017 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Rick Diamond/Getty Images for Holiday Inn)
A woman looks through a telescope on the football field at Madras High School the evening before a solar eclipse in Madras, Oregon, U.S., August 20, 2017. Picture taken August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Redmond
Curt Lerner, from Sacramento, California, prepares to watch the solar eclipse in Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 39�9'55"N 86�46'24". REUTERS/Harrison McClary
HOPKINSVILLE, KY - AUGUST 20: Eclipse Parking is seen along the side of the road in Hopkinsville city nearest the point of greatest eclipse, Aug. 20, 2017. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
JACKSON, WY - AUGUST 21: Morgan Squires, a park employee waits to help park and manage cars as they arrive to view the solar eclipse in Grand Teton National Park on August 21, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyoming. Thousands of people have flocked to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse on Monday August 21, 2017. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
Keobs Avila (R) talks to Sielh Avila at sunrise as they wait for the solar eclipse in Guernsey, Wyoming, U.S. August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Ken Spencer (R) of Buckeye, Arizona, assists people as they look at the sun through a solar filter-equipped telescope at the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience in Madras, Oregon, U.S., August 20, 2017. Picture taken August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Redmond
People wait for the solar eclipse as they watch the sunrise in Guernsey, Wyoming, U.S. August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
A sign telling customers that solar eclipse glasses are out of stock is displayed at a store in New York City, U.S. August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Cheerleaders use solar viewing glasses before welcoming guests to the football stadium to watch the total solar eclipse at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois, U.S., August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 37�42'25" N 89�13'10" W. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A cheerleader uses solar viewing glasses before welcoming guests to the football stadium to watch the total solar eclipse at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois, U.S., August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 37�42'25" N 89�13'10" W. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A worker passes solar viewing glasses to guests at the football stadium to watch the total solar eclipse at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois, U.S., August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 37�42'25" N 89�13'10" W. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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So how can you tell if you're a victim from Monday? 

According to the Miami Herald, some experts speculate it could take up to several days for people to experience symptoms of potential eye damage. However, earlier signs could range from "dim" sight to after images and even solar keratitis, which is similar to sunburn of the cornea and can cause and eye pain.

Over time, victims have been known to experience loss of vision in one or both eyes, distorted vision, altered color vision, and a condition known as solar retinopathy, which occurs when the sun burns a hole into the retinal tissues and can lead to loss of central vision. These symptoms can sometimes occur immediately after exposure to the sun or several weeks later.

SEE ALSO: When will the next total solar eclipse happen in the U.S.?

Millions from Oregon to South Carolina faced dangers of eye damage when the moon blocked out part of the sun for up to three hours, the American Optometric Association said, as the sun's light was only blocked for roughly three minutes.

The association advises people who viewed the total solar eclipse without glasses to visit a local eye care professional for a comprehensive eye examination immediately, even if you're not experiencing discomfort yet as there can be a delayed response to damaged incurred during an eclipse.

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