Suspected car thief arrested after he stops to gawk at eclipse: Cops

Monday's historic solar eclipse had millions of Americans stopping everything to look skyward... even an alleged car thief who was fleeing from police.

The Orange County Sheriff's Office in Florida posted to Facebook about an incident in Kissimmee, where a suspect is accused of stealing a car before taking off with the Auto Theft Unit in pursuit.

Read: Dark Day: Solar Eclipse Mania Takes America by Storm

Check out the best photos from the 2017 eclipse:

18 PHOTOS
The best photos from the Total Solar Eclipse
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The best photos from the Total Solar Eclipse
As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.
The solar eclipse creates the effect of a diamond ring at totality as seen from Clingmans Dome, which at 6,643 feet (2,025m) is the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 35�33'24" N, 83�29'46" W. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
The Saint-They Chapel is seen in silhouette at sunset during a partial solar eclipse, as the moon passes in front of the sun, seen at the Pointe du Van, in Brittany, France, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Mal Langsdon TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Enthusiasts Tanner Person (R) and Josh Blink, both from Vacaville, California, watch a total solar eclipse while standing atop Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills, a unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, near Mitchell, Oregon, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image is near 44�39'117'' N 120�6'042'' W. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A combination of ten pictures shows the progression of a partial solar eclipse near as a jet plane flies by the total solar eclipse in Guernsey, Wyoming U.S., August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
The Anjo Moroni statue atop the church of the Mormons is photographed while the solar eclipse is seen in Manaus, Brazil, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
A partial eclipse of the sun, as it sets, is cast on a traffic guide post through the lens of a binoculars at the "Puerto del Viento" mountain pass in Ronda, southern Spain, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jon Nazca
A multiple exposure image shows the solar eclipse as it creates the effect of a diamond ring at totality as seen from Clingmans Dome, which at 6,643 feet (2,025m) is the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 35�33'24" N, 83�29'46" W. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A total solar eclipse is photographed from atop Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills, a unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, near Mitchell, Oregon, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image is near 44�39'117'' N 120�6'042'' W. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
JEFFERSON CITY, MO - AUGUST 21: The moon begins to obscure the sun durin the4 start of the Solar Eclipse Over The United States on August 21, 2017 in Jefferson City, Missouri. (Photo by Brian Killian/WireImage)
A composite image of eight pictures shows the phases of the total eclipse as the moon passes from left to right in front of the sun during a solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Perryville, Mo. Shot with an equivalent of an 800mm lens, the partial phases are single exposures. The center image of the total eclipse is made from multiple exposures that help show more detail of the sun's corona around the moon. (Chris Lee/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images)
The total solar eclipse Monday August 21, 2017 in Madras, Oregon. Emotional sky-gazers stood transfixed across North America Monday as the Sun vanished behind the Moon in a rare total eclipse that swept the continent coast-to-coast for the first time in nearly a century. / AFP PHOTO / ROB KERR (Photo credit should read ROB KERR/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 21: The solar eclipse is seen behind the Statue of Liberty at Liberty Island on August 21, 2017 in New York City. While New York was not in the path of totality for the solar eclipse, around 72 percent of the sun was covered by the moon during the peak time of the partial eclipse. (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)
CALIFORNIA, USA - AUGUST 21: Total solar eclipse is seen in California, United States on August 21, 2017. (Photo by Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 21: (EDITORS NOTE: This image has been converted to black and white.) A lens flare during the Solar eclipse over the United States as seen from the National Mall on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)
2017 Solar Eclipse totality as seen by the people attending the viewing event at the Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem, Oregon.
Employees and visitors at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory stopped to watch the 2017 solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017.
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According to the statement, 22-year-old suspect Jocsan Feliciano Rosado got the eclipse bug and parked the vehicle he allegedly stole at a mall, where he purchased a welder's mask in order to safely gawk at the solar spectacle.

"As Rosado was standing in the parking lot next to the stolen car, with the welding helmet on and looking up at the eclipse, deputies swooped in and made an arrest," the statement reads.

And police said he never saw it coming. 

Read: Couple Saying 'I Do' Under the Total Solar Eclipse: 'He Loves the Sun, I Love the Moon'

"That only happens every 99 years," officers quipped.

Monday's event actually happens around every years somewhere on Earth, though North America won't experience another such totality until April 8, 2024.

Watch: Everything You Need to Know About the Solar Eclipse

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