Golden retriever fetches $85K worth of black tar heroin in Oregon

This dog knows how to find horse.

A golden retriever who loves to dig may have disturbed traffickers who love to sell drugs after he discovered $85,000 worth of black tar heroin buried in his family's yard in Yamhill County, Ore.

KATU reports that Kenyon's owners initially thought he'd found a time capsule and even filmed themselves opening it only to realize that rather than unearthing a treasure trove of historic objects, their 18-month-old dog had found over 15 ounces of narcotics.

RELATED: Check out these Police academy dogs in training

14 PHOTOS
Police Dogs learn to thwart attacks
See Gallery
Police Dogs learn to thwart attacks
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police K-9 explosive detection teams train on the agility course at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Jason Wharton walks with his K-9 partner Mikey, a German Shepherd, as they train outside the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
A Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police K-9 explosive detection dog leaps over an obstacle during agility training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police K-9 explosive detection teams train on the agility course at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police K-9 explosive detection dogs sit on command during agility training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Daniel McCade and his K-9 partner Droga, a Belgian Malinois, work during a simulated bomb search near dedicated MTA busses permanently installed for training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Jason Wharton interacts with his K-9 partner Mikey, a German Shepherd, as they train at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Kevin Pimpinelli works with his K-9 partner Johnny, a German Shepherd, during a simulated bomb search outside a dedicated Metro-North Railroad commuter train car permanently installed for training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Kevin Pimpinelli works with his K-9 partner Johnny, a German Shepherd, during a simulated bomb search aboard a dedicated Metro-North Railroad commuter train car permanently installed for training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Kevin Pimpinelli works with his K-9 partner Johnny, a German Shepherd, during a simulated bomb search aboard a dedicated Metro-North Railroad commuter train car permanently installed for training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Jason Wharton watches as his K-9 partner in training Mikey, a German Shepherd, indicates he has found an explosive by sitting, inside a training room in the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Keith Flood trains with his K-9 partner Doc, a German Shepherd, inside the "warehouse room" at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Keith Flood trains with his K-9 partner Doc, a German Shepherd, inside the "warehouse room" at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"Opioid addiction and overdose deaths are on the rise, and with the help of Kenyon this large quantity of heroin is removed from our community," said Sheriff Tim Svenson in a Facebook post.

After Kenyon's family contacted law enforcement, members of the Yamhill County Sheriff's Office arrived and identified the substance.

To show that every dog has his day, Svenson later presented Kenyon with a citation ribbon and name him an honorary narcotics K-9 for life.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.