'46': Scaramucci's nickname for VP Pence suggests he could be next president

Anthony Scaramucci recently alluded that current Vice President Mike Pence could be the next president of the United States after Donald Trump. 

According to Newsweek, the former White House communications director said during a live Periscope Q&A session on Sunday, “He’s going to be mad at me for telling you guys, but my nickname for the vice president is 46, so that will give you a sense for how much I like the vice president.” 

The Newsweek report added that “Scaramucci did not elaborate on whether he thought Pence would succeed Trump in the 2020 election or whether the former Indiana governor would take over should Trump resign or be forced to step down before the end of his term.” 

RELATED: Anthony Scaramucci's week in the White House

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Anthony Scaramucci's week in the White House
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Anthony Scaramucci's week in the White House
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci talks to the media outside the White House in Washington, U.S., July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci arrives to travel with U.S. President Donald Trump to Ronkonkoma, New York from Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S., July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci speaks during an on air interview at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski (C) says hello to reporters as he and White House advisors Sebastian Gorka (from L), Omarosa Manigault and Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci accompany President Trump for an event celebrating veterans at AMVETS Post 44 in Struthers, Ohio, U.S. July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci (R) walks to the White House in Washington, U.S., July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
New White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci addresses the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci (C) and senior advisor Kellyanne Conway arrive to travel with U.S. President Donald Trump to Beaver, West Virginia from Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S., July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci arrives with U.S. President Donald Trump aboard Air Force One at Long Island MacArthur Airport in Ronkonkoma, New York, U.S. July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci talks with speech writer Stephen Miller (L) as they arrive with U.S. President Donald Trump aboard Air Force One at Long Island MacArthur Airport in Ronkonkoma, New York, U.S. July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
New White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci stands by during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus walks to his car as White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci and other staff members arrive with U.S. President Trump aboard Air Force One at Long Island MacArthur Airport in Ronkonkoma, New York, U.S. July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
New White house Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci (R)), flanked by White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders, blows a kiss to reporters after addressing the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. July 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Speculation over Pence’s future political plans began growing after an August 5 New York Times report which stated that “…luminaries in [President Trump’s] own party have begun what amounts to a shadow campaign for 2020…” 

The publication also pointed to some potential hopefuls including Pence whose schedule, it said, “is so full of political events that Republicans joke that he is acting more like a second-term vice president hoping to clear the field than a No. 2 sworn in a little over six months ago.”

The Times piece went on point out that Pence has cultivated his own “power base” and launched a fundraising arm as well as installed a new chief of staff Nick Ayers whom the publication called “a sharp-elbowed political operative.”  

But soon after, Ayers and Pence’s press secretary rejected the report, with both of them calling it “fake news.” 

RELATED: People who might run against Trump in 2020

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People who might run against Trump in 2020

Former Vice President Joe Biden

(Photo by Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)

(Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

(Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Sen. Kamala Davis (D-Calif.)

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.)

(Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.)

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg

(Photo by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.)

(Photo by Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic)

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)

(Photo by: Lloyd Bishop/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo

(Photo credit MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro

(Photo by Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.)

(Photo by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)

(Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)

(Photo credit ZACH GIBSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick

(Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

(Photo by James Keivom/NY Daily News via Getty Images)

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Environmental activist Tom Steyer

(Photo by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez

(Photo by Taylor Hill/FilmMagic)

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton 

(Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom

(Photo by Yichuan Cao/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg

(Photo credit FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz

(Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)

Former first lady Michelle Obama

(Photo by Gerardo Mora/Getty Images)

Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson

(Photo by Donna Ward/Getty Images)

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii)

(Photo credit TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.)

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y)

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

California Gov. Jerry Brown

(Photo by Tiffany Rose/Getty Images for Caruso )

Media mogul Oprah Winfrey

(Photo by Moeletsi Mabe/Sunday Times/Gallo Images/Getty Images)

Former Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.)

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Former Vice President Al Gore

(Photo credit DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images)

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.)

(Photo by Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Former Sen. Jim Webb (D-Va.)

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

(Photo by Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images,)

Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.)

(Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu

Albin Lohr-Jones/Pool via Bloomberg

Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.)

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee

(Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)

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