Hillary Clinton's pastor plagiarized key parts of new prayer book

"It is Friday, but Sunday is coming."

That religious message is included in a book from Hillary Clinton's pastor scheduled to hit shelves on Tuesday, but a new report reveals that text and other portions were plagiarized.

In "Strong for a Moment Like This: The Daily Devotions of Hillary Rodham Clinton," Rev. Bill Shillady makes public the prayers he emailed to Clinton with frequency leading up to and through her 2016 election loss to President Trump. According to CNN, though, the United Methodist minister took direct passages from Rev. Matthew Deuel without giving due credit.

Deuel is a pastor at Mission Point Community Church in Warsaw, Indiana, and saw his own phrasing -- which was originally featured in a March 2016 blog post -- when CNN published an email Shillady sent Clinton the morning after Election Day. Shillady did not mention borrowing text for the email during an interview with CNN, but has since issued an apology for his oversight.

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"In preparing the devotional on the morning of November 9, I was determined to provide comfort with the familiar adage that 'It's Friday But Sunday is Coming,'" Shillady said. "I searched for passages that offered perspective of this theme. I am now stunned to realize the similarity between Matt Deuel's blog sermon and my own. Clearly, portions of my devotional that day incorporate his exact words. I apologize to Matt for not giving him the credit he deserves."

Deuel and Shillady reportedly texted after the fact, and Deuel -- despite his "shock" -- has since accepted his apology.

"The last thing the world needs right now is two pastors having a public dispute over a blog," Deuel said. "The reality is, there's nothing new under the sun."

As for the book, the editor in chief for the book's publisher says she accepts Shillady's explanation as an oversight.

Clinton, who wrote a forward for the text, is set to appear at a New York promotional event this month for the book. It is unclear whether she will still attend in the wake of this news.

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