Man accused of killing Virginia protester on Nazi death camp: This was 'where the magic happened'


Aug 14 (Reuters) - James Fields walked into the former Nazi concentration camp in Dachau, Germany, on a school trip two years ago and told a classmate he was "where the magic happened."

The account was one of several describing Fields' white supremacist views that emerged in telephone and Facebook interviews on Monday, two days after his arrest on a murder charge for ramming his car into a group of people objecting to neo-Nazis rallying in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Several students who attended Randall K. Cooper High School with Fields in Union, Kentucky, recalled him as an angry young man who spoke admiringly about the Nazis and Adolf Hitler.

Fields' court-appointed lawyer, Charles "Buddy" Weber, could not immediately be reached for comment.

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James Fields' Charlottesville white nationalist murder suspect
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James Fields' Charlottesville white nationalist murder suspect
James Alex Fields Jr., 20, is seen in a mugshot released by Charlottesville, Virginia police department after being charged with one count of second degree murder, three counts of malicious wounding and one count of failing to stop at an accident that resulted in a death after police say he drove a car into a crowd of counter protesters during the "Unite the Right" protests by white nationalist and "alt-right" demonstrators in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. Charlottesville Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
James Alex Fields Jr., (L) is seen attending the "Unite the Right" rally in Emancipation Park before being arrested by police and charged with charged with one count of second degree murder, three counts of malicious wounding and one count of failing to stop at an accident that resulted in a death after police say he drove a car into a crowd of counter-protesters later in the afternoon in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. Picture taken August 12, 2017 REUTERS/Eze Amos
James Alex Fields Jr., (2nd L with shield) is seen attending the "Unite the Right" rally in Emancipation Park before being arrested by police and charged with charged with one count of second degree murder, three counts of malicious wounding and one count of failing to stop at an accident that resulted in a death after police say he drove a car into a crowd of counter-protesters later in the afternoon in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. Picture taken August 12, 2017 REUTERS/Eze Amos
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - AUGUST 14: Matthew Heinbach of the white nationalist Traditionalist Workers Party is ushered away by sheriff's deputies outside the Charlottesville General District Court building August 14, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The court held a bond hearing for James Alex Fields, Jr. of Ohio, who is accused of driving his car into a crowd of people protesting against the Unite the Right rally, a gathering of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, KKK members and other alt-right groups on Saturday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
White nationalist leader Matthew Heimbach screams at the media outside Charlottesville General Courthouse in defense of James Alex Fields Jr., arrested on suspicion of murder, malicious wounding and hit-and-run charges as a bail hearing for Fields is held inside in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - AUGUST 14: Matthew Heinbach (L) of the white nationalist Traditionalist Workers Party and another unidentified man shout at journalists gathered outside the Charlottesville General District Court building August 14, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The court held a bond hearing for James Alex Fields, Jr. of Ohio, who is accused of driving his car into a crowd of people protesting against the Unite the Right rally, a gathering of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, KKK members and other alt-right groups on Saturday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - AUGUST 14: Reporters enter of the Charlottesville General District Court before a scheduled appearance via video link for James Alex Fields Jr. August 14, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Fields has been charged with second degree murder, malicious wounding, and failure to stop in an accident resulting in death following an incident where a vehicle plowed into a crowd of counter protesters during the 'Unite the Right' rally on August 12, 2017. 32 year old Heather Heyer was killed in the incident. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
1 dead and 20 injured in the terrorist attack executed by James A fields on 12 August 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. The Unite the Right instigated brawls between Antifa and various leftists. The brwal ensued and the White Supremacists/Alt Right supporters were forcibly removed by police. (Photo by Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Blood on the ground, left i the wake of the terrorist attacked executed by James A Fields on 12 August 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. The Unite the Right instigated brawls between Antifa and various leftists. The brwal ensued and the White Supremacists/Alt Right supporters were forcibly removed by police. (Photo by Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - AUGUST 12: The silver Dodge Charger alledgedly driven by James Alex Fields Jr. passes near the Market Street Parking Garage moments after driving into a crowd of counter-protesters on Water Street on August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Heather Heyer, 32 years old, was killed and 19 others injured when they were struck by Fields' car. (Photo by Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images)
After the terrorist attack executed by James A Fields, Street medics and EMS attempted to treat the victims of the attack on 12 August 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. The Unite the Right instigated brawls between Antifa and various leftists. The brwal ensued and the White Supremacists/Alt Right supporters were forcibly removed by police. (Photo by Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
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Fields, 20, made a brief court appearance via video link on Monday. A judge denied bail for Fields, accused of killing one woman and injuring at least 19 other people on Saturday.

During the June 2015 school trip, Fields spat on a Russian war memorial in Germany and refused to shower because he did not want to use what he called "that dirty pig water," according to a former classmate who has known Fields since childhood.

At Dachau, Fields looked like "a kid at an amusement park," said the classmate, who asked not to be identified for fear of being targeted.

"He would read excerpts from Mein Kampf, and listen to Nazi propaganda music at night," the classmate told Reuters.

SEE MORE: Police officer under fire for alleged 'love this' post regarding fatal crash in Charlottesville

Another former high school classmate, Morgan Stidham, said she did not know Fields well and never saw him doing anything violent.

"I only overheard him talking about things like Nazi stuff and how amazing Hitler was," Stidham said.

Caleb Orndorff, who went to the same high school and who is black, said he and his brother once got into a verbal confrontation with Fields and that Fields called them a racial slur in response.

Fields displayed an unusual fascination with Hitler, his former history teacher, Derek Weimer, told several news outlets.

"My first feeling: I failed, we failed," Weimer told the Toledo Blade newspaper after learning of the charge against Fields.

RELATED: See images from the grisly scene this weekend

44 PHOTOS
Charlottesville violence erupts as protesters and counterprotesters clash
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Charlottesville violence erupts as protesters and counterprotesters clash
CHARLOTTESVILLE, USA - August 12: A White Supremacist kicks back a smoke bomb thrown by counter protestors during clashes at Emancipation Park where the White Nationalists are protesting the removal of the Robert E. Lee monument in Charlottesville, Va., USA on August 12, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, USA - August 12: A White Supremacist tries to strike a counter protestor with a White Nationalist flag during clashes at Emancipation Park where the White Nationalists are protesting the removal of the Robert E. Lee monument in Charlottesville, Va., USA on August 12, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Rescue workers assist people who were injured when a car drove through a group of counter protestors at the "Unite the Right" rally Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
People receive first-aid after a car accident ran into a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville, VA on August 12, 2017. A vehicle plowed into a crowd of people Saturday at a Virginia rally where violence erupted between white nationalist demonstrators and counter-protesters, witnesses said, causing an unclear number of injuries. / AFP PHOTO / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, USA - August 12: Police, medical personnel, and other protestors attend to the injured people after a car rammed into a crowd of anti-White Supremacy protestors in Charlottesville, Va., USA on August 12, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A woman who was injured when a car drove through a group of counter protestors at the "Unite the Right" rally is helped in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts?
Rescue workers assist people who were injured when a car drove through a group of counter protestors at the "Unite the Right" rally Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Rescue workers transport a victim who was injured when a car drove through a group of counter protestors at the "Unite the Right" rally Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A woman is received first-aid after a car accident ran into a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville, VA on August 12, 2017. A picturesque Virginia city braced Saturday for a flood of white nationalist demonstrators as well as counter-protesters, declaring a local emergency as law enforcement attempted to quell early violent clashes. / AFP PHOTO / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
People receive first-aid after a car accident ran into a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville, VA on August 12, 2017. A picturesque Virginia city braced Saturday for a flood of white nationalist demonstrators as well as counter-protesters, declaring a local emergency as law enforcement attempted to quell early violent clashes. / AFP PHOTO / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Rescue workers assist people who were injured when a car drove through a group of counter protestors at the "Unite the Right" rally Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A woman is received first-aid after a car accident ran into a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville, VA on August 12, 2017. A picturesque Virginia city braced Saturday for a flood of white nationalist demonstrators as well as counter-protesters, declaring a local emergency as law enforcement attempted to quell early violent clashes. / AFP PHOTO / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, USA - August 12: A White Supremacist helps a friend after he was punched in the face during clashes with counter protestors at Emancipation Park where the White Nationalists are protesting the removal of the Robert E. Lee monument in Charlottesville, Va., USA on August 12, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, USA - August 12: A counter protestor strikes a White Nationalist with a baton during clashes at Emancipation Park where the White Nationalists are protesting the removal of the Robert E. Lee monument in Charlottesville, Va., USA on August 12, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, USA - August 12: White Supremacists and counter protestors clash at Emancipation Park where the White Nationalists are protesting the removal of the Robert E. Lee monument in Charlottesville, Va., USA on August 12, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A man is seen with an injury during a clash between members of white nationalist protesters against a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Virginia State Police move in as members of white nationalist protesters clash against a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
People struggle with a Confederate flag as a crowd of white nationalists are met by a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
CHARLOTTESVILLE, USA - August 12: White Supremacists rush forward with shields and sticks during clashes with counter protestors at Emancipation Park where the White Nationalists are protesting the removal of the Robert E. Lee monument in Charlottesville, Va., USA on August 12, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A white supremacists stands behind militia members after he scuffled with a counter demonstrator in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A white supremacists stands with militia members after he scuffled with a counter demonstrator in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A white supremacists stands behind militia members after he scuffled with a counter demonstrator in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - AUGUST 12: White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the 'alt-right' take refuge in an alleyway after being hit with pepper spray after the 'Unite the Right' rally was declared an unlawful gathering August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. After clashes with anti-facist protesters and police the rally was declared an unlawful gathering and people were forced out of Lee Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Members of white nationalists are met by a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Members of white nationalists clash against a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A white supremacists carries the Confederate flag as he arrives for a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Virginia State Troopers stand under a statue of Robert E. Lee before a white supremacists rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A white supremacist holds a flag during a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A member of a white supremacists militia stands near a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Virginia State Police officer aims during clash protests in Charlottesville, VA on August 12, 2017. A picturesque Virginia city braced Saturday for a flood of white nationalist demonstrators as well as counter-protesters, declaring a local emergency as law enforcement attempted to quell early violent clashes. / AFP PHOTO / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, USA - August 12: White Supremacists and counter protestors clash at Emancipation Park where the White Nationalists are protesting the removal of the Robert E. Lee monument in Charlottesville, Va., USA on August 12, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, USA - August 12: A White Supremacist with a White Nationalist flag during clashes with counter protestors at Emancipation Park where the White Nationalists are protesting the removal of the Robert E. Lee monument in Charlottesville, Va., USA on August 12, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Rescue workers assist people who were injured when a car drove through a group of counter protestors at the "Unite the Right" rally Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
First responders stand by a car that was struck when a car drove through a group of counter protesters at the "Unite the Right" rally Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
Rescue workers transport a victim who was injured when a car drove through a group of counter protestors at the "Unite the Right" rally Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Rescue workers assist people who were injured when a car drove through a group of counter protestors at the "Unite the Right" rally Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A man who was hit with pepper spray reacts during a clash between a crowd of white supremacist protesters against a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
White supremacists clash with counter protesters during a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A white supremacist militia member stands in front of clergy counter protesting during rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A counter protest yells at white supremacists during a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A Virginia State Trooper stands guard at the crime scene where a vehicle plowed into a crowd of counter protesters and two other vehicles (rear) near the "Unite the Right" rally organized by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
White supremacists stand behind their shields at a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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White nationalist groups gathered in the Southern college town of Charlottesville on Saturday in a "Unite the Right" rally to protest the planned removal of a statue of Confederate army commander General Robert E. Lee from a park.

Fields was among several rally participants whose pictures were shown on social media. The Anti-Defamation League posted a picture on Twitter that appeared to show Fields carrying a shield affiliated with Vanguard America, a white nationalist group. In a statement, the group denied that Fields was a member.

Fields' mother, Samantha Bloom, said he told her he was attending a rally but did not describe it in detail, according to the Blade.

"I thought it had something to do with Trump," she told the newspaper. "I try to stay out of his political views."

SEE MORE: Father of white nationalist Charlottesville marcher: He 'is not welcome at our family gatherings any longer'

Soon after graduating high school in 2015, Fields joined the U.S. Army but left by December after failing to meet training standards, the Army said in a statement.

Fields and his mother, who is confined to a wheelchair, moved from northern Kentucky to the town of Maumee in northwestern Ohio about a year ago for her job, according to the Blade. Fields began living in his own apartment several months ago and traveled to Virginia for Saturday's rally.

Fields' father was killed by a drunk driver months before his birth, the Washington Post reported, citing an unidentified uncle. (Reporting by Gabriella Borter in New York; Additional reporting by Taylor Harris in New York and Scott Malone in Charlottesville, Va.; Writing by Joseph Ax; editing by Grant McCool)

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