Scaramucci says Trump should have spoken out against white supremacists: 'It’s actually terrorism'

Anthony Scaramucci has criticized President Trump for not making a strong enough statement about the violence that erupted as white nationalists gathered for a large rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

On ABC News' "This Week" Sunday, the former White House communications director told host George Stephanopoulos, "I wouldn't have recommended that statement. I think he needed to be much harsher as it related to the white supremacists and the nature of that."

Trump had said Saturday, in part, "We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides. On many sides. It's been going on for a long time in our country. Not Donald Trump, not Barack Obama. This has been going on for a long, long time."

Images of Anthony Scaramucci's week in the White House:

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Anthony Scaramucci's week in the White House
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci talks to the media outside the White House in Washington, U.S., July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci arrives to travel with U.S. President Donald Trump to Ronkonkoma, New York from Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S., July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci speaks during an on air interview at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski (C) says hello to reporters as he and White House advisors Sebastian Gorka (from L), Omarosa Manigault and Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci accompany President Trump for an event celebrating veterans at AMVETS Post 44 in Struthers, Ohio, U.S. July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci (R) walks to the White House in Washington, U.S., July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
New White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci addresses the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci (C) and senior advisor Kellyanne Conway arrive to travel with U.S. President Donald Trump to Beaver, West Virginia from Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S., July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci arrives with U.S. President Donald Trump aboard Air Force One at Long Island MacArthur Airport in Ronkonkoma, New York, U.S. July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci talks with speech writer Stephen Miller (L) as they arrive with U.S. President Donald Trump aboard Air Force One at Long Island MacArthur Airport in Ronkonkoma, New York, U.S. July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
New White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci stands by during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus walks to his car as White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci and other staff members arrive with U.S. President Trump aboard Air Force One at Long Island MacArthur Airport in Ronkonkoma, New York, U.S. July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
New White house Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci (R)), flanked by White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders, blows a kiss to reporters after addressing the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. July 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Scaramucci also told Stephanopoulos, "I applaud [national security adviser] General McMaster for calling it out for what it is—is actually terrorism, and whether it's domestic or international terrorism, with the moral authority of the presidency, you have to call that stuff out."

McMaster had said earlier on the news program, "I certainly think any time that you commit an attack against people to incite fear, it is terrorism. It meets the definition of terrorism."

But McMaster also defended Trump's statement, telling Stephanopoulos, "What the president did is he called out anyone, anyone who is responsible for fomenting this kind of bigotry, hatred, racism, and violence. And I think the president was very clear on that."

However, even conservatives have publicly criticized Trump for not taking a stronger stance; Florida Senator Marco Rubio tweeted, "Very important for the nation to hear @potus describe events in #Charlottesville for what they are, a terror attack by #whitesupremacists."

Meanwhile, a National Review op-ed stated, in part, "...[Trump] did denounce bigotry and hatred. But...it was mealy-mouthed and wrong not to specifically name and slam the white supremacists whose march was the precipitating event here."

Thus far, three deaths related to the event have been reported along with many injured.

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