Guam governor says Trump called, assured island is safe

The governor of Guam said Saturday that he spoke with President Donald Trump amid heightened tensions between the United States and North Korea, and was assured that the people of the U.S. territory in the western Pacific are safe.

"This isn't the first time that we've had threats lobbed against our island, but this time, knowing that we have a president and a White House and a military that is watching out for us gives me a great deal of comfort," Guam Gov. Eddie Baza Calvo said in a video message posted to Facebook Saturday afternoon local time.

Calvo said he was called by White House chief of staff John Kelly and Trump Saturday morning local time and "both assured me that the people of Guam are safe."

North Korea threatened to fire missiles near Guam amid a war of words between the isolated regime and U.S. President Donald Trump over North Korea's recent intercontinental ballistic missile tests, which experts say suggest that a missile could reach the West Coast of the United States and a number of major U.S. cities.

Related: Trump: N. Korea Leader 'Will Not Get Away With What He's Doing'

Trump this week said North Korea "will be met with fire, fury and frankly powerthe likes of which this world has never seen before" if it threatens the United States.

RELATED: Guam seems unfazed by North Korea threats

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Guam seems unfazed by North Korea threats
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Guam seems unfazed by North Korea threats
Pupils sit on the World War II remnants of a torpedo at Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Tourists frolic along the Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Tourists stroll along a road on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists frolic on the waters overlooking posh hotels in Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists wait for a bus in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A tourist frolics in Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Residents do their daily routine Zumba class inside a mall on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists pose as they take a rest at a shed in Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists ride a bus in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Local residents are pictured at the Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists snorkel on the waters off Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A view of the entrance of U.S. military Andersen Air Force base on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A boy plays near the World War II remnants of a torpedo at Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A pupil flies his kite on the fields of Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A South Korean tourist carries his child in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
An amusement worker poses at the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
South Korean tourists stroll outside the Governor's Complex on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Guam Governor Eddie Calvo speaks during an interview with Reuters at the government complex on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
South Korean tourists stroll in Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists stroll in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists take part in parasail off the waters of Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists stroll in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
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Trump made the remarks after reports of an intelligence assessment that North Korea had developed a nuclear weapon small enough to fit on a missile, a significant milestone in its weapons program.

Trump on Thursday said that the "fury" promise may not have gone far enough, and on Friday Trump said that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un "will truly regret it and he will regret it fast" if he "does anything with respect to Guam, or American territory or an American ally."

In a recording of Trump's call distributed by the Guam governor's office, Trump is heard saying "we are with you 1,000 percent. You are safe." Calvo responds, "I have never felt more safe or so confident with you at the helm" and thanked Trump.

Related: B-1 Bombers Key to a U.S. Plan to Strike N. Korean Missile Sites

Guam, which has a population of around 162,000, has an Air Force base and six supersonic B-1 Lancer bombers are currently positioned there. The island is about 2,200 miles southeast of North Korea.

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