Poll: Americans overwhelmingly say Trump should try to make Obamacare work



President Donald Trump wants the Republican-controlled Senate to continue working to repeal the health care law he says is "failing," but voters – including a majority of Republicans – say they want him to try to make Obamacare work.

A new survey released Friday from the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation finds that 78 percent of Americans say Trump and his administration should "do what they can to make the current health care law work."

Following the defeat of repeal legislation in the Senate last month, Trump said he prefers to let the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, "implode." According to the survey, just 17 percent support the Trump administration taking actions to "do what they can to help the law fail so they can replace it later."

But 95 percent of Democrats, 80 percent of Independents, 52 percent of Republicans and 51 percent of self-identified Trump supporters said Trump should fix Obamacare rather than allow it to fail.

While analysts say the 2010 law is stabilizing on its own, Trump has not committed his administration to continuing to make payments to insurers to cover cost-sharing subsidies, resulting in uncertainty that a separate Kaiser Family Foundation analysis this week says is responsible for premium hikes an average of 19 percent over normal increases for next year.

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Trump sounds off on state of Obamacare: 7/18
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Trump sounds off on state of Obamacare: 7/18
Republicans should just REPEAL failing ObamaCare now & work on a new Healthcare Plan that will start from a clean slate. Dems will join in!
We were let down by all of the Democrats and a few Republicans. Most Republicans were loyal, terrific & worked really hard. We will return!
As I have always said, let ObamaCare fail and then come together and do a great healthcare plan. Stay tuned!
With only a very small majority, the Republicans in the House & Senate need more victories next year since Dems totally obstruct, no votes!
The Senate must go to a 51 vote majority instead of current 60 votes. Even parts of full Repeal need 60. 8 Dems control Senate. Crazy!
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By a nearly 3-to-1 margin, survey respondents say they prefer Republicans in Congress take a similar approach, working in a bipartisan fashion with Democrats to improve the current law, rather than repeal and replace it.

And nearly twice as many say Congress should refuse to go along with Trump's insistence that they return to work on repealing Obamacare as say they should move on to other issues.

Further, the poll suggests Republicans should be incentivized to fix the current law, as voters say they will hold the party in power responsible for any problems with it going forward: Sixty percent say Trump and the Republican Congress will get the blame for Obamacare-related issues, compared to just 28 percent who say they would blame former President Barack Obama and Democrats.

Still, some lawmakers want to press forward with repeal, despite the difficulty the House had in passing its repeal and replace legislation earlier this year, and the failure of efforts in the Senate.

On Friday, members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus moved to file a discharge petition to force House Speaker Paul Ryan to bring up a "clean" repeal bill, without a replacement plan, for a vote.

Even if they succeed in getting the majority of signatures needed to bring up the vote – a long shot – the Senate already rejected a clean repeal last month.

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Protests for and against Obamacare
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Protests for and against Obamacare

Tea Party Patriots supporters hold signs protesting the Affordable Care Act in front of the Supreme Court as the court hears arguments on the health care reform bill on Tuesday, March 27, 2012.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Affordable Care Act supporters wave signs outside the Supreme Court after the court upheld court's Obamacare on Thursday, June 25, 2015.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A man holds signs during a protest on the second day of oral arguments for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building on March 27, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today is the second of three days the high court has set aside to hear six hours of arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Sister Caroline attends a rally with other supporters of religious freedom to praise the Supreme Court's decision in the Hobby Lobby, contraception coverage requirement case on June 30, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby, which operates a chain of arts-and-craft stores, challenged the provision and the high court ruled 5-4 that requiring family-owned corporations to pay for insurance coverage for contraception under the Affordable Care Act violated a federal law protecting religious freedom.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

An Obamacare supporter counter protests a Tea Party rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in the morning hours of March 27, 2012 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court continued to hear oral arguments on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Affordable Care Act supporters hold up signs outside the Supreme Court as they wait for the court's decision on Obamacare on Thursday, June 25, 2015.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Ron Kirby holds a sign while marching in protest of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

A protester waves his bible in the air as he overpowered by cheers from supporters of the Affordable Care Act as they celebrate the opinion for health care outside of the Supreme Court in Washington,Thursday June 25, 2015. The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.

(Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Nuns, who are opposed to the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate, and other supporters rally outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 23, 2016. On Wednesday morning, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral arguments in Zubik v. Burwell, a consolidated case brought by religious groups challenging a process for opting out of the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate.

(Drew Angerer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Supporters of contraception rally before Zubik v. Burwell, an appeal brought by Christian groups demanding full exemption from the requirement to provide insurance covering contraception under the Affordable Care Act, is heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington March 23, 2016.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Protestors hold placards challenging 'Obamacare' outside of the US Supreme Court on March 4, 2015 in Washington, DC. The US Supreme Court heard a second challenge to US President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. The US Supreme Court faces a momentous case Wednesday on the sweeping health insurance reform law that President Barack Obama wants to leave as part of his legacy. The question before the court is whether the seven million people or more who subscribed via the government's website can obtain tax subsidies that make the coverage affordable. A ruling is expected in June.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

 Linda Door (L) protests against President Obama's health care plan in front of the U.S. Supreme Court Building on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act celebrate after the Supreme Court up held the law in the 6-3 vote at the Supreme Court in Washington June 25, 2015. The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide availability of tax subsidies that are crucial to the implementation of President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, handing a major victory to the president.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

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