Guam publishes fact sheet on 'preparing for an imminent missile threat'

Guam Homeland Security has released a fact sheet on how to be prepared for an "imminent missile threat."

As tensions between the United States and North Korea escalate -- and as Kim Jong Un and his hermit regime threaten to direct "enveloping fire" at the American island of Guam -- an advisory has been issued on how the 160,000 people who live there can ready themselves.

- "Don't look at the flash or fireball - it can blind you!" it warns.

- Take shelter as soon as you can. Radioactive fallout can be carried by wind for miles.

- Remove your clothing to keep radioactive material from spreading.

- Shower, or if you can't use a wipe or wet cloth to get rid of radioactive material.

RELATED: Guam seems unfazed by North Korea threats

23 PHOTOS
Guam seems unfazed by North Korea threats
See Gallery
Guam seems unfazed by North Korea threats
Pupils sit on the World War II remnants of a torpedo at Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Tourists frolic along the Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Tourists stroll along a road on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists frolic on the waters overlooking posh hotels in Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists wait for a bus in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A tourist frolics in Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Residents do their daily routine Zumba class inside a mall on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists pose as they take a rest at a shed in Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists ride a bus in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Local residents are pictured at the Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists snorkel on the waters off Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A view of the entrance of U.S. military Andersen Air Force base on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A boy plays near the World War II remnants of a torpedo at Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A pupil flies his kite on the fields of Asan Memorial Park on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 11, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A South Korean tourist carries his child in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
An amusement worker poses at the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
South Korean tourists stroll outside the Governor's Complex on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Guam Governor Eddie Calvo speaks during an interview with Reuters at the government complex on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
South Korean tourists stroll in Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists stroll in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists take part in parasail off the waters of Tumon beach on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Tourists stroll in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam, a U.S. Pacific Territory, August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

While some are preparing in this way, many are taking it a step further -- they are investing in a bomb shelter.

Bomb shelter business professionals say this industry is literally exploding.

The general manager of Rising S Bunkers in Texas told the Miami Herald in January that sales were up 700 percent since President Donald Trump was elected.

These investments are no cheap purchase, though. Atlas Survival introduced their cheapest option - the Bombnado- for $18,999.

If that's out of your budget, there's always Guam's safety fact sheet.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.