Controversial ‘deep state’ memo claims to shed light on which officials are working against Trump

A controversial memo which indicates the presence of friction within the National Security Council, or NSC, has been released by Foreign Policy.

The memo was reportedly authored by a former NSC director of strategic planning, Rich Higgins, who was ousted from his position last month after national security adviser H.R. McMaster and other top officials reportedly learned it had come from him.

Titled "POTUS & Political Warfare," Higgins' document details a "multi-pronged attack" on the president and his policies from the "deep state" including government insiders, globalists, bankers -- and even Islamists, and establishment Republicans.

Meet all the key members of Trump's inner circle:

28 PHOTOS
Members past and present of President Trump's inner circle
See Gallery
Members past and present of President Trump's inner circle
Steve Bannon: Former White House chief strategist, soon to be out of his role
Ivanka Trump: First daughter and presidential adviser
Jared Kushner: Son-in-law and senior adviser
Gen. John Kelly: Former Secretary of Homeland Security, current White House chief of staff
Kellyanne Conway: Former Trump campaign manager, current counselor to the president
Reince Priebus: Former White House chief of staff, no longer with the Trump administration
Anthony Scaramucci: Former White House communications director, no longer with the Trump administration
Sarah Huckabee Sanders: White House press secretary
Donald Trump Jr.: First son to President Trump
Sean Spicer: Former White House press secretary, soon to be no longer with the Trump administration
Jeff Sessions: U.S. attorney general
Steve Mnuchin: Secretary of Treasury
Paul Manafort: Former Trump campaign chairman
Carter Page: Former foreign policy adviser to Trump's presidential campaign
Omarosa Manigault: Director of communications for the Office of Public Liaison
Melania Trump: Wife to President Trump and first lady of the United States
Jason Miller: Former White House communications director, no longer with the Trump administration
Hope Hicks: White House Director of Strategic Communications
Mike Dubke: Former White House communications director, no longer with the Trump administration
Stephen Miller: Trump senior policy adviser
Corey Lewandowski: Former Trump campaign manager
Eric Trump: Son to President Trump
Rex Tillerson: Secretary of State
Michael Flynn: Former National Security Advisor, no longer with the Trump administration
Sebastian Gorka: Deputy assistant to the president in the Trump administration
Roger Stone: Former Trump campaign adviser, current host of Stone Cold Truth
Betsy DeVos: U.S. Education Secretary
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

While McMaster was not called out by name in the document, the memo clearly implies his involvement in the plot to thwart the president's agenda, according to one source Foreign Policy talked to.

Higgins, the author, is known to be loyal to Michael Flynn, who briefly served as Trump's national security adviser before resigning in February over contacts with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

Meanwhile, another top official who has reportedly backed Higgins in the past is the president's chief strategist Steve Bannon, the person McMaster reportedly believes is feeding negative stories about him to right-wing news sites.

While McMaster is said to have the support of White House chief of staff John Kelly, his future with Trump is viewed by some as on shaky ground.

RELATED: See the states where folks love (and hate) Trump

35 PHOTOS
States with the highest and lowest Trump job approval ratings
See Gallery
States with the highest and lowest Trump job approval ratings

Idaho

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Utah

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Montana

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Wyoming

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

North Dakota

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Ben Harding via Getty Images)

South Dakota

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Nebraska

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Kansas

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Oklahoma

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Arkansas

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Louisiana

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Alabama

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

South Carolina

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Sean Pavone via Getty Images)

Tennessee 

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Kentucky

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

West Virginia

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Stan Rohrer via Getty Images)

Alaska

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Massachusetts

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Vermont

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Rhode Island

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo by Kenneth C. Zirkel via Getty Images)

Connecticut

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Jersey

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New York

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Delaware

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Maryland

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Virginia

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Illinois

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Minnesota

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Colorado

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Mexico

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Washington

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Oregon

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

California

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Hawaii

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The president was reportedly angry at him for letting Higgins go, with one insider indicating the resentment is still there.

Trump and McMaster are also believed to have disagreed on other personnel matters and issues like Afghanistan and Russia, notes The Atlantic.

A New York Times report from May claims that the president has complained about McMaster's talkativeness in meetings and that Trump even once referred to him as "pain."

However, about a week ago, Trump spoke out in support of his beleaguered adviser.

"General McMaster and I are working very well together. He is a good man and very pro-Israel. I am grateful for the work he continues to do serving our country," he said.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.