Trump reportedly gets a folder full of 'admiring tweets' and pictures of him 'looking powerful' twice a day

President Donald Trump has a folder delivered to him twice a day that's full of positive headlines, tweets, interviews, and sometimes photographs of him on TV "looking powerful," VICE News reported on Tuesday.

The folder, dubbed "the Propaganda Document" by some in the White House, is prepared by the communications team. The only feedback the White House press shop has ever gotten about the folder, VICE said, was that "it needs to be more f------ positive."

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States with the highest and lowest Trump job approval ratings

Idaho

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Utah

Approval rating: 50% or higher

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Montana

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Wyoming

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

North Dakota

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Ben Harding via Getty Images)

South Dakota

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Nebraska

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Kansas

Approval rating: 50% or higher

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Oklahoma

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Arkansas

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Louisiana

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Alabama

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

South Carolina

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Sean Pavone via Getty Images)

Tennessee 

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Kentucky

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

West Virginia

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Stan Rohrer via Getty Images)

Alaska

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Massachusetts

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Vermont

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Rhode Island

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo by Kenneth C. Zirkel via Getty Images)

Connecticut

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Jersey

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New York

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Delaware

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Maryland

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Virginia

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Illinois

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Minnesota

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Colorado

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Mexico

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Washington

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Oregon

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

California

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Hawaii

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

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The process of putting the folder together is long and tedious, and starts at 6 a.m. ET every morning in the Republican National Committee's "war room," according to VICE. Staffers keep tabs on the morning shows on three major cable news networks — CNN, MSNBC, and Fox News — while searching for positive headlines about Trump on the internet. They then email the White House communications team proposed tweets, transcripts, and headlines to include.

And when there isn't enough positive information to show the president, his communications office asks RNC staffers for photos that depict Trump favorably, VICE reported.

Although White House sources told VICE that former chief of staff Reince Priebus and former White House press secretary Sean Spicer used to vie for the chance to personally give Trump the folder, Spicer disputed the account when he was contacted.

"While I won't comment on materials we share with the president, this is not accurate on several levels," he told VICE. He did not elaborate on what, specifically, about the story was untrue.

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Flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, President Donald Trump delivers his Joint Address to Congress at the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, February 28, 2017.

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President-elect Donald Trump walks to take his seat for the inaugural swearing-in ceremony at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 20, 2017.

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump talks on the phone aboard Air Force One during a flight to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to address a joint gathering of House and Senate Republicans, Thursday, January 26, 2017. This was the President’s first trip aboard Air Force One. 

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

New England Patriots Coach Bill Belichick delivers remarks during the team's visit to the White House celebrating their Super Bowl LI victory on the South Lawn, Wednesday, April 19, 2017. 

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump lands in Marine One at the Snap-On Headquarters, Tuesday, April 18, 2017, in Kenosha, Wisconsin. The President toured the headquarters and signed the "Buy American, Hire American" Executive Order. 

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence admire several Harley-Davidson bikes on the South Lawn driveway of the White House in Washington, D.C. President Trump hosted a lunch for Harley-Davidson executives, as well as union representatives for machinist and steel workers, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., Thursday, February 2, 2017.

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg walk along the West Colonnade of the White House, Wednesday, April 12, 2017. 

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

Chief of Staff Reince Priebus looks into the Oval Office as President Donald Trump reads over his notes, Friday, March 10, 2017, prior to meeting with key House Committee Chairmen at the White House. 

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Friday, March 17, 2017, in the outer Oval Office, joined by Senior White House Advisor Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump, at the White House in Washington, D.C. 

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu talk together prior to President Trump’s address, Tuesday, May 23, 2017, at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump reviews his remarks backstage at the National Prayer Breakfast at the Washington Hilton in Washington, D.C., Thursday, February 2, 2017. 

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump, joined by members of the U.S. delegation, participate in a wreath laying at Israel’s Holocaust museum, Yad Vashem, Tuesday, May 23, 2017, in Jerusalem. 

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump join King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia, and the President of Egypt, Abdel Fattah Al Sisi, Sunday, May 21, 2017, to participate in the inaugural opening of the Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology.

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump talks to members of the press in his office aboard Air Force One during a flight from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, Thursday, January 26, 2017.

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump waves to supporters on Saturday, March 4, 2017, in West Palm Beach, Florida. 

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald J. Trump receives a briefing on a military strike on Syria from his National Security team, including a video teleconference with Secretary of Defense, Gen. James Mattis, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, on Thursday April 6, 2017, in a secured location.

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

President Donald Trump delivers an address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday, February 28, 2017, at the U.S. Capitol. This is the President's first Address to Congress of his presidency.

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

From the Red Room on the State Floor of the White House, President Donald J. Trump looks out of a window Wednesday, May 3, 2017, prior to joining guests for an evangelical advisory board dinner.

(Photo by Shealah Craighead/The White House)

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Before his inauguration in January, Trump told the news website Axios that he liked bullet points, and that he didn't need "200-page reports on something that can be handled on a page." Intelligence officials thus condensed the main points Trump could bring up in his meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin into "tweet-length sentences."

Trump also prefers his daily intelligence briefings to be short and feature "killer graphics", the Washington Post reported in May.

Reuters, citing an anonymous source, reported in May that National Security Council officials would strategically include Trump's name in "as many paragraphs as we can because he keeps reading if he's mentioned."

Trump's relationship with the press is more tumultuous than past presidents'. He has shown a tendency to focus on outlets that are more favorable to him, like Fox News. He frequently praises the network's morning show, "FOX & Friends," as well as pro-Trump commentators like Sean Hannity and Lou Dobbs.

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U.S. President Donald Trump is saluted by a military official as he departs from the capitol for the inaugural parade after his swearing in at the Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump gestures to the crowd as he stands with U.S. Army personnel as he watches the Army vs Navy college football game at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Maryland, December 10, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. President Donald Trump awards the Medal of Honor to James McCloughan, who served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, during a ceremony at the White House in Washington, U.S. July 31, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump attends a lunch with members of the U.S. military during a visit at the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) and Special Operations Command (SOCOM) headquarters in Tampa, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump poses for a photo with Army Sgt First Class Alvaro Barrientos, his wife Tammy and First Lady Melania Trump (R) after awarding him a Purple Heart at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., April 22, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump attends a lunch with members of the U.S. military during a visit at the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) and Special Operations Command (SOCOM) headquarters in Tampa, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 20: U.S. President Donald Trump salutes a U.S. Marine before boarding Marine One while departing from the White House, on March 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump is traveling to Louisville Kentucky to speak at a Make America Great Rally. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with military personnel as he arrives at Harrisburg international airport, before attending a rally marking his first 100 days in office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. April 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump attends a lunch with members of the U.S. military during a visit at the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) and Special Operations Command (SOCOM) headquarters in Tampa, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures as he speaks to U.S. military personnel at Naval Air Station Sigonella following the G7 Summit, in Sigonella, Italy, May 27, 2017. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi
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Conversely, he has soured on outlets like CNN and MSNBC, calling them "fake news" and "dishonest," because they run stories more critical of him.

In July, he drew condemnation for launching a personal attack "Morning Joe" co-host Mika Brzezinski, who frequently lambastes him on the air.

"I heard poorly rated @Morning_Joe speaks badly of me (don't watch anymore). Then how come low I.Q. Crazy Mika, along with Psycho Joe, came ... to Mar-a-Lago 3 nights in a row around New Year's Eve, and insisted on joining me. She was bleeding badly from a face-lift. I said no!" Trump said in a pair of tweets.

Trump also raised eyebrows earlier that month, when he tweeted out a video of him body-slamming and punching WWE CEO Vince McMahon.

In the edited video Trump tweeted, an image of the CNN logo was superimposed on McMahon's face to make it appear as though Trump was pummeling the news network.

"#FraudNewsCNN #FNN," Trump wrote, presumably shortening his moniker for the channel, "Fraud News Network."

A July Gallup poll found that 35% of Americans thought media coverage of Trump was "too tough," while 34% said it was "not tough enough." Another 28% think the tone of his coverage is "just right."

More from Business Insider:
Officials are preparing Trump for his big meeting with Putin by giving him 'tweet-length sentences' to talk about
Trump wants his daily intelligence briefings short and full of 'killer graphics'
A mother and daughter stopped speaking after Trump was elected — here's their emotional first conversation 6 months later

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