GOP voters would support Kasich over Trump or Pence in the 2020 New Hampshire primary

More Republican voters in New Hampshire would support Ohio Gov. John Kasich than would support President Donald Trump in a 2020 presidential primary race, according to a new poll.

The survey, called the New Hampshire Poll, found that, overall, 52% of likely GOP primary voters would support Kasich, a vocal Trump critic who ran as a more moderate Republican in the 2016 presidential election, while just 40% would cast their ballots for Trump.

Among undeclared voters, 54% would vote for Kasich and 37% for Trump. A majority — 53% — of all of the surveyed GOP voters said they disapprove of Trump's job in office, while just 44% approve.

A plurality of voters also said they would support Kasich's candidacy over that of Vice President Mike Pence. Forty-one percent said they would vote for the governor, while just 27% said they would vote for Pence.

See the states where Trump is most -- and least -- popular:

35 PHOTOS
States with the highest and lowest Trump job approval ratings
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States with the highest and lowest Trump job approval ratings

Idaho

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Utah

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Montana

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Wyoming

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

North Dakota

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Ben Harding via Getty Images)

South Dakota

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Nebraska

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Kansas

Approval rating: 50% or higher

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Oklahoma

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Arkansas

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Louisiana

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Alabama

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

South Carolina

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Sean Pavone via Getty Images)

Tennessee 

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Kentucky

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

West Virginia

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Stan Rohrer via Getty Images)

Alaska

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Massachusetts

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Vermont

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Rhode Island

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo by Kenneth C. Zirkel via Getty Images)

Connecticut

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Jersey

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New York

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Delaware

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Maryland

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Virginia

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Illinois

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Minnesota

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Colorado

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Mexico

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Washington

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Oregon

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

California

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Hawaii

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

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Kasich, who was the last primary competitor to drop out of the 2016 race before Trump took the party's nomination, has not ruled out the possibility that he'll run in 2020. The governor, whose term will be up in January 2019, spent the spring touring the country promoting his new book, "Two Paths: America Divided or United," and has planned several policy forums in Ohio and across the country.

For his part, Pence has vigorously denied having any ambition to run for president in 2020, despite speculation among fellow Republicans that the vice president is positioning himself for a run.

But mounting a primary challenge to a sitting president is a risky move — no president in American history has lost to a challenger within his own party.

The survey of 600 likely Republican presidential primary voters was conducted between August 4 and 6 and had a margin of error of plus or minus four percentage points.

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See Also:

SEE ALSO: John Kasich opens up on Trump's first 100 days, major divides in American politics, and his political future

SEE ALSO: John Kasich's dire warning for the Republican Party: EVOLVE OR DIE

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