Another Baltimore Police body-cam video shows officers 'plant' drugs

A number of criminal cases in Baltimore have gone up in smoke over the past two weeks after two Baltimore police body-camera videos have allegedly shown officers planting drugs on residents of the city.

The most recent video, released Tuesday by Baltimore defense attorney Josh Insley, has led the Baltimore City States Attorney's Office to refer two officers to Internal Affairs and postpone all cases involving the officers.

Five cases have also been dismissed — including Insley's client, Shamere Collins, 35, whose car appears in the newly released video.

"I think they put something in my car," Collins told NBC News' Stephanie Gosk in an exclusive interview.

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WEST VALLEY CITY, UT - MARCH 2: West Valley City patrol officer Gatrell starts a body camera recording by pressing a button on his chest before he takes a theft report from a construction worker with his newly-issued body camera attached to the side of a pair of glasses on March 2, 2015 in West Valley City, Utah. West Valley City Police Department has issued 190 Taser Axon Flex body cameras for all it's sworn officers to wear starting today. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 04: Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, left, with LAPD Chief Charlie Beck, right, who is wearing a body camera, shows the new LAPD body camera and cell phone with special ap's that allow the officer to see what the camera is recording, during a press conference at LAPD Mission Division Friday September 4, 2015 as they talked about the rollout of the agency's officer body cameras. The rollout of the body cameras began last Monday at LAPD's Mission Division in the north San Fernando Valley when officers received final instructions on using the cameras during roll call training sessions. About 1,000 video were recorded during the first two days of operation, according to Mayor Garcetti. (Photo by Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
WEST VALLEY CITY, UT - MARCH 2: West Valley City patrol officer Gatrell performs a traffic stop on the first day of use of his newly-issued body camera attached to the side of a pair of glasses on March 2, 2015 in West Valley City, Utah. West Valley City Police Department has issued 190 Taser Axon Flex body cameras for all it's sworn officers to wear starting today. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
FERGUSON, MO - AUGUST 30: A police officer wears a body camera at a rally for Michael Brown August 30, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Michael Brown, an 18-year-old unarmed teenager, was shot and killed by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson on August 9. His death caused several days of violent protests along with rioting and looting in Ferguson. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
WEST VALLEY CITY, UT - MARCH 2: West Valley City patrol officer Gatrell performs a traffic stop on the first day of use of his newly-issued body camera attached to the side of a pair of glasses on March 2, 2015 in West Valley City, Utah. West Valley City Police Department has issued 190 Taser Axon Flex body cameras for all it's sworn officers to wear starting today. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
WEST VALLEY CITY, UT - MARCH 2: Several newly-deployed body cameras and batteries sit in the patrol room charging and downloading video at the West Valley City Police Department on March 2, 2015 in West Valley City, Utah. West Valley City Police Department has issued 190 Taser Axon Flex body cameras for all it's sworn officers to wear starting today. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 03: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio holds up a body camera that the New York Police Department (NYPD) will begin using during a press conference on December 3, 2014 in New York City. The NYPD is beginning a trial exploring the use of body cameras; starting Friday NYPD officers in three different precincts will begin wearing body cameras during their patrols. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 03: New York Police Department (NYPD) Sergeant Joseph Freer demonstrates how to use and operate a body camera during a media press conference on December 3, 2014 in New York City. The NYPD is beginning a trial exploring the use of body cameras; starting Friday NYPD officers in three different precincts will begin wearing body cameras during their patrols. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
A body camera from Taser is seen during a press conference at City Hall September 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Washington, DC Metropolitan Police Department is embarking on a six- month pilot program where 250 body cameras will be used by officers. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
(L-R) Washington DC Police Officer Debra Domino, Master Patrol Officer Benjamin Fettering and Officer JaShawn Colkley model body cameras during a press conference at City Hall September 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Washington, DC Metropolitan Police Department is embarking on a six- month pilot program where 250 body cameras will be used by officers. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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Officers arrested Collins on Nov. 29, 2016, after they told her they smelled marijuana. They then searched her car and said they recovered bags of heroin and marijuana. She was later charged with felony distribution of narcotics.

The most recent video appears to show an officer place a baggie of what appears to be drugs inside of a car while surrounded by other Baltimore police. He then bends over again and appears to find them.

Collins, who admits to being a recreational marijuana smoker, said she was shocked to hear they had discovered the bags of weed and heroin.

"My mind — I went numb like — I didn't know what was going on," Collins said. "They [were] telling me I was facing time and all this ... so it's like I felt numb. I didn't know what to do."

More from NBC News: Body Camera Video Allegedly Shows Baltimore Police 'Plant' Drugs

Two officers in Collins' case were referred to Internal Affairs by the city's State Attorney's Office, which urged residents to not rush to judgment.

But, two weeks ago, Maryland Office of the Public Defender released a similar video in which an officer appeared to plant and later find drugs on a plot of a Baltimore residence. Three officers were implicated in the video.

The State's Attorney's Office said that it had dismissed or is set to dismiss 41 cases because of the first video, 55 are under review and 27 are considered viable cases to prosecute because of evidence beyond the officers' testimony.

Two of those officers were placed on administrative duty and one was suspended.

These cases of police evidence tampering aren't helping the image of a beleaguered agency one year removed from a U.S. Department of Justice report that described the Baltimore Police Department as engaging "in a pattern or practice of conduct that violates the Constitution or federal law."

"What these videos show is a deep culture of disrespect for the people of Baltimore," said Assistant Public Defender Debbie Katz Levi.

The Baltimore Police Department is investigating both videos and advising officers to keep their body cameras on at all times.

Baltimore Police Spokesman T.J. Smith described the video as disturbing but said that the clip is perhaps being taken out of context.

"There's more to the story, I mean, the only sections that are being relooped and relooped are the questionable sections," he told NBC News.

Smith later suggested that the police may have recreated the drug discovery for the body cameras.

Still, Collins said that it has shaken her faith in the Baltimore police, which she said is widespread throughout the city.

"It makes us even scared to address the police or call them for anything because we're scared," Collins said. "I'm not saying all police are bad because I have law [enforcement] in my family. So I'm not saying all of them are bad but it's ... the one's that's bad is making all of them look bad."

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