New York crushes two tons of ivory to smash illegal trade

The Wildlife Conservation Society crushed more than two tons of elephant ivory in Central Park on Thursday to encourage the end of the illegal ivory trade that conservationists say kills a hundred elephants a day in Africa and other parts of the world.

"Today we are not only crushing the haul of massive material you see here, we're also crushing the entire supply chain that continues to bring this illegal ivory into the United States," the organization's executive vice president of public affairs, John Calvelli, said. "If you are thinking of profiting from the sale of elephant ivory in New York, think again, because our state is closed for business."

Calvelli said there are ivory bans in New York, New Jersey, California, Hawaii, Washington, Oregon and Nevada.

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New York crushes two tons of ivory
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New York crushes two tons of ivory
Law enforcement officials load a carved piece of ivory onto a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Carved ivory is pictured before being placed into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A carved piece of ivory falls into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Actress Kristin Davis poses during #IvoryCrush in Central Park in New York on August 3,2017, where New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will destroy nearly two tons of illegal ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts. The ivory has a net worth of more than 8 million USD, representing more than 100 elephants. The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry, and other decorative items will be crushed in Central Park after the end of the ceremony. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Carved ivory is pictured before being placed into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Carved ivory is pictured before being placed into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Music legend and wildlife advocate Mick Fleetwood, ambassador for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) holds a piece of ivory to be crushed during #IvoryCrush in Central Park in New York on August 3,2017, where New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will destroy nearly two tons of illegal ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts. The ivory has a net worth of more than 8 million USD, representing more than 100 elephants. The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry, and other decorative items will be crushed in Central Park after the end of the ceremony. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Carved ivory is pictured before being placed into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Carved ivory is pictured before being placed into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Carved ivory is pictured before being placed into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Carved ivory is pictured before being placed into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Carved ivory is pictured before being placed into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Law enforcement officials load a carved piece of ivory onto a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Some of the ivory is viewed on display during #IvoryCrush in Central Park in New York on August 3,2017, where New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will destroy nearly two tons of illegal ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts. The ivory has a net worth of more than 8 million USD, representing more than 100 elephants. The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry, and other decorative items will be crushed in Central Park after the end of the ceremony. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
A carved piece of ivory falls into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Some of the ivory is viewed on display during #IvoryCrush in Central Park in New York on August 3,2017, where New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will destroy nearly two tons of illegal ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts. The ivory has a net worth of more than 8 million USD, representing more than 100 elephants. The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry, and other decorative items will be crushed in Central Park after the end of the ceremony. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman places a carved piece of ivory onto a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Carved ivory is pictured before being placed into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Some of the ivory is viewed on display during #IvoryCrush in Central Park in New York on August 3,2017, where New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will destroy nearly two tons of illegal ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts. The ivory has a net worth of more than 8 million USD, representing more than 100 elephants. The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry, and other decorative items will be crushed in Central Park after the end of the ceremony. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. holds a carved piece of ivory before placing it into a crusher in Central Park in New York City, New York, U.S., August 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Some of the ivory is viewed on display during #IvoryCrush in Central Park in New York on August 3,2017, where New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will destroy nearly two tons of illegal ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts. The ivory has a net worth of more than 8 million USD, representing more than 100 elephants. The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry, and other decorative items will be crushed in Central Park after the end of the ceremony. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Ivory is put into a crusher during #IvoryCrush in Central Park in New York on August 3,2017, where New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will destroy nearly two tons of illegal ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts. The ivory has a net worth of more than 8 million USD, representing more than 100 elephants. The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry, and other decorative items will be crushed in Central Park after the end of the ceremony. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Some of the ivory is viewed on display during #IvoryCrush in Central Park in New York on August 3,2017, where New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will destroy nearly two tons of illegal ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts. The ivory has a net worth of more than 8 million USD, representing more than 100 elephants. The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry, and other decorative items will be crushed in Central Park after the end of the ceremony. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Some of the ivory is viewed on display during #IvoryCrush in Central Park in New York on August 3,2017, where New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will destroy nearly two tons of illegal ivory confiscated through state enforcement efforts. The ivory has a net worth of more than 8 million USD, representing more than 100 elephants. The ivory tusks, trinkets, statues, jewelry, and other decorative items will be crushed in Central Park after the end of the ceremony. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
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