Aaron Schock’s lawyers want case tossed over 'invasive' questions about his sex life 

Attorneys for former GOP Congressman Aaron Schock of Illinois have asked a judge to dismiss the fraud and other charges he is facing, claiming prosecutorial misconduct over questions about his sex life.

According to the Chicago Sun-Times, Schock's legal team filed a 92-page brief on Tuesday which argues, "The prosecutor and federal agents have repeatedly asked irrelevant and highly invasive questions about Mr. Schock's sexual orientation and relationships."

The document also says, "The government has investigated nearly every facet of Mr. Schock's professional, political, and personal life. This even includes his sex life. It is no secret that there has long been speculative gossip in the media about Mr. Schock's sexual orientation "

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Former GOP Congressman Aaron Schock
Representative Aaron Schock, a Republican from Illinois, pauses while speaking during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. Republicans on the House Ways and Means Committee resisted parts of the early versions of Chairman Dave Campo's plan for the biggest tax-code changes since 1986, said Schock. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. Republican lawmakers Cathy McMorris-Rodgers (R) and Aaron Schock pose for a picture with a garland made of cotton thread on the portrait of Mahatma Gandhi during their visit to Gandhi Ashram in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad March 28, 2013. A visiting U.S. congressional delegation on Thursday invited the chief minister of Gujarat, Narendra Modi, to the United States, despite the fact that Washington has denied him a visa since 2005 because of deadly religious riots. REUTERS/Amit Dave (INDIA - Tags: POLITICS)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 27: Congressman Aaron Schock attends the 2014 Global Citizen Festival to end extreme poverty by 2030 at Central Park on September 27, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Ben Gabbe/Getty Images for Global Citizen Festival)
UNITED STATES - AUGUST 14: Reps. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., right, and Aaron Schock, R-Ill., attend Republican Day at the Illinois State Fair in Springfield, Ill., August 14, 2014. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, USA - JUNE 8: Former United States Representative for Illinois, Aaron Schock, waits for Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India addresses a joint session of the United States Congress at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, USA on June 8, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 29: Aaron Schock attends an after party at Poste at the Hotel Monaco after the Kevin Spacey Foundation Benefit Concert at Sidney Harmon Hall on September 29, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Kris Connor/WireImage)
Congressman Aaron Schock speaks to the media as he arrives at an immigration reform panel hosted by the Illinois Business Immigration Coalition Monday, March 9, 2015, at St. Ignatius College Prep in Chicago. Schock resigned Tuesday amid controversy over his spending habits. (Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 8: Former Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., appears on the House floor after Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressed a Joint Meeting of Congress, June 8, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock speaks on the panel at the George W. Bush Institute forum at the Art Institute in Chicago in September 2012. Schock resigned Tuesday amid controversy over his spending habits. (Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
U.S. Republican lawmaker Aaron Schock (2nd R) spins cotton on a wheel during his visit to Gandhi Ashram in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad March 28, 2013. A visiting U.S. congressional delegation on Thursday invited the chief minister of Gujarat, Narendra Modi, to the United States, despite the fact that Washington has denied him a visa since 2005 because of deadly religious riots. REUTERS/Amit Dave (INDIA - Tags: POLITICS)
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The filing also states that inquires about his romantic relationships were not only offensive but prejudicial.

As the Journal Star explains, his attorneys are more broadly claiming that "prosecutors decided they wanted to indict Schock, then set about finding something they could charge him with."

The former representative was indicted in November on 24 counts involving theft, fraud, and filing false tax returns, among others, notes Chicago Tribune.

Schock had previously been criticized for leading what appeared to be an unusually lavish lifestyle on a government salary; this reportedly included private flights and NFL box seats.

Though he attributed the problems to honest mistakes and aggressive politics, he ultimately resigned from his seat in 2015 after about seven years in Congress.

The latest filing isn't the first time officials involved in Schock's prosecution have been accused of improper behavior. In April, federal investigators were alleged to have secret recordings of the former lawmaker and records taken from his office, notes CNN.

Should the case continue, Schock would be put on trial early next year.

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