Trump is reportedly thinking about bringing Rudy Giuliani on as attorney general amid troubles with Jeff Sessions

President Donald Trump is reportedly thinking about bringing former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani on as his Attorney General, White House sources told Axios on Monday.

Axios' Mike Allen wrote that Trump "has recently pondered the idea of nominating Giuliani" for the job currently held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The news came soon after Trump's latest broadside at the "beleaguered" head of his Justice Department.

Jeff Sessions through the years

32 PHOTOS
Jeff Sessions through the years
See Gallery
Jeff Sessions through the years

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions pauses at a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington, U.S., March 2, 2017.

(REUTERS/Yuri Gripas)

Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama arrives at Trump Tower for meetings with President-elect Donald Trump works from home November 15, 2016. Making the vital choices for President-elect Donald Trump's White House cabinet has sparked intense infighting, CNN reported Monday, with one source calling it a 'knife fight.' The jobs to be filled include national security positions and West Wing posts, the television news network said, as Trump gathered with transition team members in New York.

(TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

President-elect Donald Trump greets Senator Jeff Sessions, Trump's picks for attorney general, during a thank you rally in Ladd-Peebles Stadium on December 17, 2016 in Mobile, Alabama. President-elect Trump has been visiting several states that he won, to thank people for their support during the U.S. election.

(Photo by Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., right, and Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., nominee for attorney general, talk near the Ohio Clock after a meeting in the Capitol, November 30, 2016.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Attorney General-designate, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., speaks during a 'USA Thank You Tour 2016' event at the LaddPeebles Stadium in Mobile, AL on Saturday, Dec. 17, 2016.

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Senator Jeff Sessions, attorney general pick for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, right, listens as Senator Charles 'Chuck' Grassley, a Republican from Iowa, speaks during a meeting in Washington, D.C., U.S, on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016. Sessions, the 69-year-old, four-term Alabama Republican is a hard-liner on free trade and immigration, arguing that prospective immigrants don't have constitutional protections.

(Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

US President-elect Donald Trump (C) talks with Alabama Governor Robert Bentley (2nd L) and US Attorney General nominee Jeff Sessions (L) as he arrives in Mobile, Alabama, for a 'Thank You Tour 2016' rally on December 17, 2016.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Mike Pence, 2016 Republican vice presidential nominee, left, and Senator Jeff Sessions, a Republican from Alabama, gesture during a campaign event for Donald Trump, 2016 Republican presidential nominee, not pictured, in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Trump returned to form in Phoenix Wednesday night with a nativist immigration plan definitively ruling out legal status for undocumented immigrants, as well as proposing to build a wall on the southern border of the United States and forcing Mexico to cover the cost.

(Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

MADISON, AL - FEBRUARY 28: United States Senator Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, beomes the first Senator to endorse Donald Trump for President of the United States at Madison City Stadium on February 28, 2016 in Madison, Alabama.

(Photo by Taylor Hill/WireImage)

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT)(L) speaks during a Senate Budget Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, February 3, 2015 in Washington, DC. The committee is hearing testimony Office of Management and Budget Director Shaun Donovan on President Obamas FY2016 budget request. Also pitcured are (L-R), Chairman Michael Enzi (R-WY), Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL), Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), and Sen. Rob Poertman (R-OH).

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) (2nd L) speaks as Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) (L), and Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) (R) listen during a news conference September 9, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The legislators discussed on immigration reform during the news conference.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

House Budget Chairman, Paul Ryan, R-Wis., Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-AL., and members of the House Budget Committee during the House Budget Committee's news conference on the 'Introduction of the FY2013 Budget - Pathway to Prosperity.'

(Photo By Douglas Graham/Roll Call)

Sens. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., left, and Mike Lee, R-Utah, leave the Capitol en route to a news conference to oppose the immigration reform bill in the Senate.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli performs during the National Prayer Breakfast as First Lady Michelle Obama (L), US President Barack Obama (2nd L) and Senator Jeff Sessions (3rd L), R-AL, watch on February 7, 2013 at a hotel in Washington, DC.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-AL., talks with Sen. Patty Murray, D-WA., as they make their way to the Senate policy luncheons through the Senate subway in the U.S. Capitol on September 17, 2013.

(Photo By Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., is interviewed by the press during the weekly Senate policy luncheons. The Senate vote will this afternoon on Obama's small-business tax relief legislation.

(Photo by Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., speaks at the 'Iran Democratic Transition Conference,' hosted by the Institute of World Politics in Capitol Visitor Center. The conference explored the prospects of political change in Iran.

(Photo By Tom Williams/Roll Call)

US President Barack Obama (C) signs the Fair Sentencing Act in the Oval Office of the White House, on August 3, 2010 in Washington, DC. The law will aim to correct the disparities between crack and powder cocaine sentencing. Also in the picture (L to R); Attorney General Eric Holder, Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont, Democratic Representative Bobby Scott of Virginia, Democratic Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois, Republican Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama, Republican Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah and Democratic Representative Sheila Jackson-Lee of Texas. Previously, people in possession of powder cocaine could carry up to one hundred times more grams than crack offenders and receive the same sentence.

(Photo by Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images)

U.S. Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan (L) shakes hands with Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) (R), ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, while Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) looks on, after she arrived for the first day of her confirmation hearings on Capitol Hill June 28, 2010 in Washington, DC. Kagan is U.S. President Barack Obama's second Supreme Court nominee since taking office.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The new co chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee Senator Jeff Sessions (D-AL) works in his office on Capitol Hill Tuesday morning May 02, 2009. Sen. Sessions speaks to Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-VT) before visiting with US Supreme Court nominee Judge Sonia Sotomayor.

(The Washington Post via Getty Images)

US President Barack Obama (3rd-R) and Vice President Joe Biden (3rd-L) meet with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (2nd-R) ,D-NV, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (2nd-L),R-KY, Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Patrick Leahy (R) ,D-VT, and Senate Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Jeff Sessions (L),R-AL, about the upcoming Supreme Court nomination on May 13, 2009 at the White House in Washington, DC.  

(TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Committee Chairman Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) (R) listens as ranking member Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) (L) questions Supreme Court nominee Judge Sonia Sotomayor during the second day of her confirmation hearings July 14, 2009 in Washington, DC. Sotomayor faces a full day of questioning from Senators on the committee today. Sotomayor, an appeals court judge and U.S. President Barack Obama's first Supreme Court nominee, will become the first Hispanic justice on the Supreme Court if confirmed.

(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

US President George W. Bush (L) listens as Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions (R) speaks during a Republican fundraiser for Sessions at the Arthur R. Outlaw Mobile Convention Center in Mobile, Alabama, 21 June 2007.

(SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

US President George W. Bush (2R) waves as he stands with First Lady Laura Bush (R), Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions (2L) and his wife Mary (L) after a Republican fundraiser for Sessions at the Arthur R. Outlaw Mobile Convention Center in Mobile, Alabama, 21 June 2007.

(SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Baghdad, IRAQ: US Senators Ben Nelson, D-Nebraska, (L) and Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, speak to the media after meeting Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki in Baghdad, 28 April 2007. Maliki told a delegation of visiting US lawmakers today that foreign powers should not try to influence the Iraqi political process. He also resisted calls for his Shiite-led government to rehabilitate former members of ousted Sunni dictator Saddam Hussein's regime. Maliki met a group of US congressmen shortly after their chamber voted for a law calling for a timetable for American troop withdrawal from Iraq.

(KHALID MOHAMMED/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions, R-AL, (C) speaks with the media as (L-R) U.S. Senator George Allen (R-VA), U.S. Representative David Dreier (R-CA) and U.S. Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI) listen at the White House after participating in a meeting with U.S. President George W. Bush on March 16, 2006 in Washington, DC. Senators from various states, including U.S. Senator John Kerry (D-MA), participated in a line item veto legislation meeting.

(Photo by Dennis Brack-Pool/Getty Images)

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., and Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., during a news conference after the Senate took a step Wednesday toward the 'security first' approach to immigration control promoted in the House, paving the way for action on legislation that would require construction of 700 miles of double-layered fencing along segments of the U.S. border with Mexico. Despite Democratic charges that Republicans were moving the bill (HR 6061) to score political points seven weeks before Election Day, the Senate voted 94-0 to limit debate on a motion to proceed to formal consideration of the measure. The bill (HR 6061), which would also authorize a 'virtual fence' of sensors, cameras, unmanned aerial vehicles and other surveillance technology along the entire southwest border, was passed by the House last week. Three more targeted border security and internal immigration enforcement measures are set for House action, possibly as early as Thursday. Frist supported an earlier Senate comprehensive bill that would offer a path to citizenship to millions of illegal immigrants. Sessions did not; he considers that aspect of the bill amnesty.

(Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

U.S. Senators Lindsey Graham (R-SC) (L), speaks with U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) during a Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for Alberto R. Gonzales January 6, 2005 in Washington, DC. U.S. President George W. Bush has nominated Gonzales to be the U.S. Attorney General.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., in his office in the Russell Senate Office Building.

(Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., and Senator-elect Elizabeth Dole, R-N.C., talk in the Ohio Clock Corridor during the election meeting for Senate Republican leadership.

(Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

Sen. Jeff Sessions at a hearing to examine 'President Clinton's Eleventh Hour Pardons.'

(Photo By Tom Williams/Roll Call/Getty Images)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"So why aren't the Committees and investigators, and of course our beleaguered A.G., looking into Crooked Hillarys crimes & Russia relations?" Trump tweeted on Monday morning.

Trump's views on his attorney general have soured in the months since Sessions decided it was best to recuse himself from any investigations involving the Trump campaign, which he was closely associated with. That includes all of the Russia-related investigations, which special counsel Robert Mueller is overseeing.

In an interview last week with The New York Times, Trump said he wouldn't have hired Sessions if he knew he'd recuse himself from the Russia investigation.

"So Jeff Sessions takes the job, gets into the job, recuses himself," Trump said. "I then have — which, frankly, I think is very unfair to the president. How do you take a job and then recuse yourself? If he would have recused himself before the job, I would have said, 'Thanks, Jeff, but I can't, you know, I'm not going to take you.' It's extremely unfair, and that's a mild word, to the president. So he recuses himself. I then end up with a second man, who's a deputy."

RELATED: Rudy Giuliani through the years

34 PHOTOS
Rudy Giuliani through the years
See Gallery
Rudy Giuliani through the years
Rudy Giuliani, former mayor of New York, smiles while arriving to participate in a discussion during the Values Voter Summit with Donald Trump, 2016 Republican presidential nominee, not pictured, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. Trump and his running mate said this week that Russian President Vladimir Putin is a stronger leader than U.S. President Barack Obama, provoking Democratic condemnation and prompting some Republicans to distance themselves. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 27: Rudolph Giuliani, US Attorney for the Southern District of New York, is photographed February 27, 1985 announcing the arrests in the 'Commission' case. A Federal racketeering indictment charged nine men with participating in a ''commission'' that governs the five organized-crime ''families'' in New York City. (Photo by Yvonne Hemsey/Getty Images)
D.A. Rudolph Giuliani at Daily News Newsmakers Conference. (Photo By: Anthony Casale/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
Koch & Giuliani, join comm. of Doi Kevin Frawley, outline the guilty pleas of six arrested in bribes. 1. Giuliani and Koch await their turn in press con at D.O.I. 80 Maiden Lane. 2. Giuliani and Koch. 3. Head to Head after Giuliani gave Koch an Excellent to a reporter's questionKoch got up to shake his hand when he was through. January 17, 1989. (Photo by Louis Liotta/New York Post Archives / (c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images)
Giuliani holds press conference about the NYC homeless. August 01, 1989. (Photo by Dan Brinzac/New York Post Archives / (c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images)
Guiliani at Inside Edition -- New TV personality at Inside Edition, Rudy Guiliani. Rudy Guiliani. Rudy honing up before taping of his part of the show. Rudy reviewing tapes in editing room. March 12, 1990. (Photo by Michael Schwartz/New York Post Archives / (c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images)
Rudy Giuliani. November 05, 1993. (Photo by David Rentas/New York Post Archives / (c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 02: Andrew Giuliani yawns as his father Rudy speaks after he was sworn in as mayor of New York City. (Photo by Budd Williams/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
Rudy Giuliani. January 12, 1994. (Photo by David Rentas/New York Post Archives / (c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images)
Police, criminal justice unions endorse Cuomo for governor on steps of City Hall. Thomas Scotto, Pres. of N.Y.C.P. detectives, endorsement assoc. was between them. October 25, 1994. (Photo by Michael Norcia/New York Post Archives / (c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) California governor Pete Wilson meets with New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani at city hall. (Photo by mark peterson/Corbis via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 26: New York Knicks' President David Checketts (left) and NBA Commissioner David Stern present Mayor Rudy Giuliani with a Giuliani 98 jersey. The 1998 NBA All-Star game will be held in New York City. (Photo by Keith Torrie/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 02: Shadow of Mayor Rudy Giuliani shows against background after he was endorsed by the hotel workers union at the Waldorf-Astoria., (Photo by Susan Watts/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
26 Oct 1996: New York City mayor Rudy Guilliani, George Steinbrenner, and New York Yankees manager Joe Torre celebrate after Game Six of the World Series against the Atlanta Braves at Yankee Stadium in New York City, New York. The Yankees won the game, 3-
UNITED STATES - MAY 04: Mayor Rudy Giuliani is flanked by CBS President Leslie Moonves (left) and Donald Trump at news conference at the GM Building, where CBS announced that Bryant Gumbel will be the host of its new morning news program, 'This Morning.' Show, to be launched Nov. 1, will broadcast from Trump's International Plaza Building., (Photo by Andrew Savulich/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
399759 01: Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani made his first appearance on 'The Tonight Show with Jay Leno' January 16, 2002 in Burbank CA. Giulani talked about the events of September 11 and his recent selection as Time Magazine's 'Man of the Year.' (Photo by Paul Drinkwater/NBC via Getty Images)
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE -- Episode 9 -- Air Date 12/15/2001 -- Pictured: (l-r) Tina Fey, Rudy Giuliani, Jimmy Fallon during 'Weekend Update' on December 15, 2001 (Photo by Dana Edelson/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
400517 05: Former New York City Mayor, Rudy Giuliani, gives a thumbs up to football fans before Super Bowl XXXVI February 3, 2002 in New Orleans, LA. Super Bowl XXXVI will be played by the New England Patriots and the St. Louis Rams at the Superdome in New Orleans, LA. (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)
MANCHESTER, UNITED KINGDOM - JANUARY 22: Former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani smiles as he sits with copies of his book 'Leadership', published last October on January 22, 2003 in Waterstones bookshop, Deansgate, Manchester, England. The book outlines 'the principles Giuliani has worked through, and how he has adhered to them through his career, and how they came into play in the aftermath of the World Trade Centre'. (Photo by Gary M.Prior/Getty Images)
CEDAR RAPIDS, IA - JANUARY 19: Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani gestures as he takes questions from emergency personnel at a rally held to drum up support for the 2004 Bush-Cheney presidential ticket January 19, 2004 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Iowa will be the first state in the nation to test the popularity of the Democratic presidential hopefuls when it holds the caucuses tonight. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 24: Former Mayor Rudy Giuliani kisses the hand of a little girl as he visits Hale House in Harlem on the day before Christmas to pass out gifts and read holiday stories to the children. (Photo by Susan Watts/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 11: Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani speaks as he makes a tribute to the victims of the terrorist attacks of 2001 on September 11, 2005 in New York City. This is the fourth anniversary of the September 11th attacks. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
WILKES-BARRE, PA - NOVEMBER 3: Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani (R) speaks as U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA) (L) looks on at a campaign rally November 3, 2006 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Santorum faces Democratic challenger Bob Casey Jr. in the November election. (Photo by Jeff Fusco/Getty Images)
SPARTANBURG, SC - FEBRUARY 21: Republican presidential hopeful, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani holds a campaign rally with first responders at the North Spartanburg Fire Department on February 21, 2007 in Spartanburg, South Carolina. (Photo by Charles Ommanney/Getty Images)
HENDERSON, NV - NOVEMBER 01: Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani reacts as he is greeted by supporters at a McCain-Palin regional headquarters office November 1, 2008 in Henderson, Nevada. As candidates continue to bring out the political heavy-hitters for their last pitches, Giuliani will be campaigning in several states for Republican presidential nominee Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) leading up to the election on November 4. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - NOVEMBER 06: Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani celebrates during the New York Yankees World Series Victory Parade on November 6, 2009 in New York, New York. (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)
LATE NIGHT WITH JIMMY FALLON -- Episode 487 -- Pictured: (l-r) Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani during an interview with Jimmy Fallon on August 8, 2011 (Photo by Lloyd Bishop/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES â SEPTEMBER 6: Former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani waits to speak at the National Press Club luncheon in Washington on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011. (Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call)
July 27, 2012 Former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani and the Republican Team Meet & Greet to Support Romney in his Presidential Campaign. Mayor Giuliani looking for support as the guest speaker in the Cuban Community of Calle Ocho - Little Havana in South FloridaFlorida (Photo by Michele Eve Sandberg/Corbis via Getty Images)
SCARBOROUGH, NY - JULY 17: Rudy Giuliani attends Joe Torre Safe At Home Foundation 2013 Golf and Tennis Classic at Sleepy Hollow Country Club on July 17, 2013 in Scarborough, New York. (Photo by Bobby Bank/Getty Images)
Florida Gov. Rick Scott and former Mayor of New York Rudy Giuliani, arrive at a campaign stop in Miami, as Scott kicks off the Get Out the Early Vote bus tour (Photo by Michele Eve Sandberg/Corbis via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 15: Former Mayor of New York City Rudy Giuliani attends the Opening Night premiere of 'Live From New York!' during the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival at the Beacon Theatre on April 15, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images for the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival)
PHOENIX, AZ - AUGUST 31: Rudy Giuliani, former mayor of New York City, speaks in support of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a Trump campaign rally on August 31, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Ralph Freso/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

That second man, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, hired Mueller as special counsel after Trump abruptly fired James Comey as FBI director in May. Comey was overseeing an FBI investigation into whether the Trump campaign had colluded with Russian officials during the 2016 presidential election.

Addressing Trump's comments on Friday, Sessions said during a press conference that he is "totally confident that we can continue to run this office in an effective way."

"We serve him right now," Sessions said after being asked how he could continued doing his job if he did not have the confidence of the president. "The work we're doing today is the kind of work we intend to continue."

SEE ALSO: Attorney General Jeff Sessions prepares for crackdown on marijuana

Both Sessions and Giuliani were among Trump's earliest and most prominent backers. If Sessions is fired or resigns, and Trump does decide to nominate Giuliani, the former mayor and federal prosecutor could have a tough time reaching the needed 50 votes in a Senate confirmation hearing, considering his work for foreign governments, stop-and-frisk police policies, and extremely close ties to Trump from the campaign.

When Trump was first selecting his top cabinet officials after winning the November election, Giuliani insisted on being named secretary of state. He reportedly was not interested in other top posts, including attorney general.

More from Business Insider:

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.