Parents of UK baby Charlie Gard end legal battle over treatment

LONDON, July 24 (Reuters) - The parents of Charlie Gard have ended their legal battle to give the terminally ill British baby further treatment, a lawyer representing the parents said on Monday.

The lawyer told London's High Court that time had "run out" for the child.

"For Charlie it is too late. The damage has been done," Grant Armstrong said.

Charlie has a rare genetic condition causing progressive muscle weakness and brain damage. His parents had sought to send him to the United States to undergo experimental therapy.

Britain's courts, backed by the European Court of Human Rights, have refused permission, saying it would prolong his suffering without any realistic prospect of helping the 11-month-old child.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Pope Francis have voiced support for Charlie. (Reporting by Michael Holden; Writing by William Schomberg; editing by Kate Holton)

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Charlie Gard's parents
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Charlie Gard's parents
Chris Gard and Connie Yates, who are battling to take their baby Charlie to the US for treatment against advice from doctors that he should be taken off life support arrive at The High Court in London, Britain April 5, 2017. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
Chris Gard and Connie Yates, who are battling to take their baby Charlie to the US for treatment against advice from doctors that he should be taken off life support arrive at The High Court in London, Britain April 5, 2017. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
Chris Gard and Connie Yates, who are battling to take their baby Charlie to the US for treatment against advice from doctors that he should be taken off life support arrive at The High Court in London, Britain April 5, 2017. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
Chris Gard, who is battling to take his baby Charlie Gard to the US for treatment against advice from doctors that he should be taken off life support arrives at The High Court in London, Britain April 5, 2017. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
Connie Yates, who is battling to take her baby Charlie Gard to the US for treatment against advice from doctors that he should be taken off life support arrives at The High Court in London, Britain April 5, 2017. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 07: Parents of Charlie Gard, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, walk through the grounds of the Royal Courts of Justice on April 7, 2017 in London, United Kingdom. Their crowdfunding campaign raising money for treatment in the US for their eight month old son, Charlie Gard, reached its target of �1.2million this past weekend. Charlie suffers from a form of mitochondrial disease and is the subject of a dispute over life-support between the Great Ormond Street specialists who are treating him and his parents. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 07: Parents of Charlie Gard, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, walk through the grounds of the Royal Courts of Justice on April 7, 2017 in London, United Kingdom. Their crowdfunding campaign raising money for treatment in the US for their eight month old son, Charlie Gard, reached its target of �1.2million this past weekend. Charlie suffers from a form of mitochondrial disease and is the subject of a dispute over life-support between the Great Ormond Street specialists who are treating him and his parents. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 07: Parents of Charlie Gard, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, walk through the grounds of the Royal Courts of Justice on April 7, 2017 in London, United Kingdom. Their crowdfunding campaign raising money for treatment in the US for their eight month old son, Charlie Gard, reached its target of �1.2million this past weekend. Charlie suffers from a form of mitochondrial disease and is the subject of a dispute over life-support between the Great Ormond Street specialists who are treating him and his parents. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 07: Parents of Charlie Gard, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, walk through the grounds of the Royal Courts of Justice on April 7, 2017 in London, United Kingdom. Their crowdfunding campaign raising money for treatment in the US for their eight month old son, Charlie Gard, reached its target of �1.2million this past weekend. Charlie suffers from a form of mitochondrial disease and is the subject of a dispute over life-support between the Great Ormond Street specialists who are treating him and his parents. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
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