Photo of cub give scientists hope for survival of incredibly rare tiger

The shadow of a baby Siberian tiger cub is giving scientists hope for the survival of one of the world's rarest tigers.

The image of a shadow and paws of at least one baby tiger with its mother was captured by PROO Tiger Center.

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White tiger cubs at San Jorge Zoo
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White tiger cubs at San Jorge Zoo
Newborn white Siberian tiger cubs are presented to the media at San Jorge zoo in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A newborn white Siberian tiger cub is presented to the media at San Jorge zoo in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
Newborn white Siberian tiger cubs are presented to the media at San Jorge zoo in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
Newborn white Siberian tiger cubs are presented to the media at San Jorge zoo in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
Newborn white Siberian tiger cubs play next to their mother as they are presented to the media at San Jorge zoo in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
A newborn white Siberian tiger cub is pictured in its enclosure at San Jorge zoo in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 15, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A newborn white Siberian tiger cub is pictured next to its mother in their enclosure at San Jorge zoo in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 15, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
A newborn white Siberian tiger cub is pictured in its enclosure at San Jorge zoo in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 15, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
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The female, known as Svetlaya, had been released back into the wild in 2014 by Russian scientists hoping to restore the tiger population.

She met up with another rehabilitated male tiger, named Borya, and stayed close over the years which appears to have lead to the new baby cub.

With the cub, Svetlaya has become a founding mother of the Pri-Amur tiger population.

The Tiger Program Coordinator for the Wildlife Conservation Society said: "This image demonstrates not only that we can rehabilitate and release tigers back into the wild, but we can use this process to recolonize lost tiger habitat."

It's a huge step for the Amur tiger since the World Wildlife Federation says there are no more than 40 of them left in the wild, putting them on the brink of extinction.

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