White House throwing its support behind the FCC's effort to end Obama-era net neutrality rules

The White House is throwing its support behind the FCC's efforts to end the Obama-era net neutrality rules.

"The previous administration went about this the wrong way by imposing rules on ISPs through the FCC's Title II rulemaking power." said Deputy White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Tuesday.

The rules were designed to prevent broadband providers from blocking or slowing down some types of content.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, a Republican, has been leading the charge in rolling back the measure.

In his "Restoring Internet Freedom" plan, he would go after a Title II rule that gave the FCC the power to regulate broadband providers by reclassifying them as common carriers.

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WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 25: Federal Communications Commission Commissioner Ajit Pai testifies before the House Judiciary Committee about Internet regulation in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill March 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. Wheeler faced a tough line of questioning from the committee's Republicans about the FCC's recent move to regulate broadband Internet service like a utility using Title II of the Communications Act. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 25: Federal Communications Commission Commissioner Ajit Pai (R) and FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler testify before the House Judiciary Committee about Internet regulation in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill March 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. Wheeler faced a tough line of questioning from the committee's Republicans about the FCC's recent move to regulate broadband Internet service like a utility using Title II of the Communications Act. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 25: (L-R) House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), Federal Communications Commission Commissioner Ajit Pai and FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler visit before a hearing about Internet regulation in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill March 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. Wheeler faced a tough line of questioning from the committee's Republicans about the FCC's recent move to regulate broadband Internet service like a utility using Title II of the Communications Act. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 04: A sign that reads 'Protect Net Neutrality& Reclassify Title II is on display during a news conference on Capitol Hill, February 4. 2015 in Washington, DC. Senate Democrats are calling on the Federal Communications Commission to reclassify the transmission component of broadband Internet access as a telecommunications service under Title II of the Telecommunications Act. to prevent broadband providers from creating Internet fast lanes for those who can pay and enforce open internet protections. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Activists gather outside the headquarters of the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) on December 11, 2014 in Washington, DC. The group gathered to rally for net neutrality prior to the FCC's monthly meeting. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian activists wear Guy Fawkes masks as they hold placards during a demonstration supporting 'net neutrality' in Bangalore on April 23, 2015. The activists urged the Indian government to pass legislation to ensure net neutraliy and prevent private service providers from gaining control over the internet. AFP PHOTO / Manjunath KIRAN (Photo credit should read Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian activists wear Guy Fawkes masks as they hold placards during a demonstration supporting 'net neutrality' in Bangalore on April 23, 2015. The activists urged the Indian government to pass legislation to ensure net neutraliy and prevent private service providers from gaining control over the internet. AFP PHOTO / Manjunath KIRAN (Photo credit should read Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)
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