Major breakthrough: Scientists teleport particle into space

For the first time ever, scientists have teleported something into space.

Chinese scientists from the University of Science and Technology of China sent a photon up away from earth.

It's further than something like that has been sent before.

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A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule carrying International Space Station (ISS) crew members, Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, descends near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule carrying International Space Station (ISS) crew members, Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, descends outside the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule carrying International Space Station (ISS) crew members Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, lands outside the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule stands on the ground shortly after its landing with International Space Station (ISS) crew members Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, as a rescue helicopter lands nearby, outside the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule stands on the ground shortly after its landing with International Space Station (ISS) crew members Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, as a rescue helicopter lands nearby, outside the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists stand around the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule after its landing southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan waves shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. calls his relatives shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan calls his relatives shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
The International Space Station (ISS) crew members Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, surrounded by ground personnel, rest shortly after landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team members carry International Space Station (ISS) crew member Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. shortly after landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. shortly after landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia shortly after landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team members carry International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Rescue team members carry International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
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According to the scientists' published paper, it happens through teleportation using quantum entanglement.

That means it transfers the information about a photon to another point in space.

Meaning, it replicates it without actually transporting it.

This isn't just exciting because it's a breakthrough, but because it could mean big things for future technological developments.

Such as a quantum internet that connects different parts of the world at seemingly impossible speeds.

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