California’s Whittier fire ravages boy scouts camp, kills animals

A wildfire tearing through western California on Sunday mostly destroyed a Boy Scouts camp, killing all of the animals in its nature center, authorities said.

The Whittier Fire in Los Padres National Forest, which began about 1:30 p.m. (4:30 p.m. ET) Saturday and jumped across Highway 154, had grown to about 7,800 acres, incident commanders said Sunday afternoon. It remained only 5 percent contained, they said.

RELATED: Wildfires rage across the western United States

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Wildfires rage across western United States

The full moon rises over flames of the Alamo fire on a hilltop off Highway 166 east of Santa Maria, California, U.S. July 7, 2017. 

(Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Dept/Handout via REUTERS)

Smoke from the Alamo fire rises in an aerial view near Santa Maria, California, U.S. July 7, 2017.

(San Luis Obispo Fire Department/Handout via REUTERS)

A young black bear leaves the area around Twitchell Dam as firefighters battle the Alamo fire near Santa Maria, California, U.S. July 7, 2017.

(Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Dept/Handout via REUTERS)

Smoke rises from the Goodwin Fire which had prompted the evacuation of the town of Mayer, Arizona, U.S. June 27, 2017.

(Arizona Department of Transportation/Handout via REUTERS)

Smoke rises from the Goodwin Fire which had prompted the evacuation of the town of Mayer, Arizona, U.S. June 27, 2017.

(Arizona Department of Transportation/Handout via REUTERS)

Smoke rises from the Goodwin Fire which had prompted the evacuation of the town of Mayer, Arizona, U.S. June 28, 2017.

(Arizona Department of Transportation/Handout via REUTERS)

An aerial photo of wildfires burning across almost 50,000 acres near the ski resort of Brian Head, about 245 miles south of Salt Lake City, Utah is shown in this handout photo provided June 27, 2017.

(Courtesy Lt. Governor Spencer J Cox/Handout via REUTERS)

An aerial photo of wildfires burning across almost 50,000 acres near the ski resort of Brian Head, about 245 miles south of Salt Lake City, Utah is shown in this handout photo provided June 27, 2017.

(Courtesy Lt. Governor Spencer J Cox/Handout via REUTERS)

Amy Noraka, holding daughter Sage, 3, left, and her husband Chris Noraka, with son Tyler, 6, watch as helicopters dump water on the Peak 2 fire on July 5, 2017 in Breckenridge, Colorado. The fire, which started shortly after noon, resulted in a mandatory evacuation for the Peak 7 neighborhood and an evacuation standby order for roughly 40 homes in the Gold Hill neighborhood. A shift in the wind is pushing the wildfire north and slowing its climb up the mountain. Eight smokejumpers and a local firefighting crew are on scene. An air attack is underway with a tanker dropping flame retardant and a helicopter conducting bucket drops. The fire broke out in the Gold Hill Trail area near Breckenridge.

(Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Concerned residents look at the Peak 2 fire from the top of Swan Mountain Road on July 5, 2017 in Breckenridge, Colorado. The fire, which started shortly after noon, resulted in a mandatory evacuation for the Peak 7 neighborhood and an evacuation standby order for roughly 40 homes in the Gold Hill neighborhood. A shift in the wind is pushing the wildfire north and slowing its climb up the mountain. Eight smokejumpers and a local firefighting crew are on scene. An air attack is underway with a tanker dropping flame retardant and a helicopter conducting bucket drops. The fire broke out in the Gold Hill Trail area near Breckenridge.

(Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Firetrucks arrive on scene to help fight the Peak 2 fire on July 5, 2017 in Breckenridge, Colorado. The fire, which started shortly after noon, resulted in a mandatory evacuation for the Peak 7 neighborhood and an evacuation standby order for roughly 40 homes in the Gold Hill neighborhood. A shift in the wind is pushing the wildfire north and slowing its climb up the mountain. Eight smokejumpers and a local firefighting crew are on scene. An air attack is underway with a tanker dropping flame retardant and a helicopter conducting bucket drops. The fire broke out in the Gold Hill Trail area near Breckenridge.

(Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Fighters move into the woods to fight a wildfire that is burning on June 25, 2017 outside Panguitch, Utah. The fire named the 'Brian Head Fire' started last week and has burned more then 43,000 acres and destroyed 13 homes as of June 25th.

(Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)

As the sun sets helicopters continue to make water dumps on the Peak 2 fire on July 5, 2017 in Breckenridge, Colorado. The fire, which started shortly after noon, resulted in a mandatory evacuation for the Peak 7 neighborhood and an evacuation standby order for roughly 40 homes in the Gold Hill neighborhood. A shift in the wind is pushing the wildfire north and slowing its climb up the mountain. Eight smokejumpers and a local firefighting crew are on scene. An air attack is underway with a tanker dropping flame retardant and a helicopter conducting bucket drops. The fire broke out in the Gold Hill Trail area near Breckenridge.

(Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

A wildfire burned up to the the edge of a home but left it standing on June 25, 2017 outside Panguitch, Utah. The fire named the 'Brian Head Fire' started last week and has burned more then 43,000 acres and destroyed 13 homes as of June 25th.

(Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)

As the sun sets helicopters continue to make water dumps on the Peak 2 fire on July 5, 2017 in Breckenridge, Colorado. The fire, which started shortly after noon, resulted in a mandatory evacuation for the Peak 7 neighborhood and an evacuation standby order for roughly 40 homes in the Gold Hill neighborhood. A shift in the wind is pushing the wildfire north and slowing its climb up the mountain. Eight smokejumpers and a local firefighting crew are on scene. An air attack is underway with a tanker dropping flame retardant and a helicopter conducting bucket drops. The fire broke out in the Gold Hill Trail area near Breckenridge.

(Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

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The Outdoor School at Rancho Alegre, an outdoor residential education center that is home to the Los Padres Council of the Boy Scouts of America, said in a statement Sunday that it had "lost our dear animal friends in the nature center and many of the staff on site have lost most of their belongings."

All staff members were safely evacuated, but many lost most of their belongings, it said.

The Boy Scouts council said that "a number of structures" were destroyed and that it was working with other councils to keep its programs going.

"It's a rough fight," Jim Harris, the national forest's deputy fire chief, told reporters Sunday afternoon. Years of drought in the region created dangerously dry conditions that were aggravated by high temperatures that reached 110 degrees on Saturday, Harris said.

About 80 people at Circle V Ranch Camp in Santa Barbara County — most of them children — were forced to stay put and shelter Saturday night as acres of forest burned, Santa Barbara County Fire Chief Eric Peterson told reporters Sunday.

The campers were later evacuated and reunited with their families after what Peterson called a "rescue operation."

"They rode it out for hours, literally hours," he said.

Photos: Raging Wildfires Threaten Hundreds of Homes in California

Mandatory evacuation orders were in effect for the area around Highway 154. Incident commanders said anyone in close-by areas should be prepared to be evacuated quickly.

At least 400 firefighters were assigned to the fire, whose cause officially remains under investigation, although authorities said they believe it began with a vehicle fire.

Tom Horning, a camper from San Diego, said he had spent two days at Lake Cachuma, near where the fire burned when his wife got a text asking whether he had been able to evacuate safely.

He said he looked off in the distance, saw the smoke and tried to head back away from the fire but was turned away at the highway.

"As far as other people were in danger of losing their homes, I mean we're kind of lucky," Horning told NBC affiliate KSBY of Santa Barbara. "All we have is our camping stuff."

A second fire, known as the Alamo Fire, which was burning in San Luis Obispo County, north of Santa Barbara County, exploded to 24,000 acres on Sunday after it broke out on Thursday afternoon, fire officials said.

The fire remained only 10 percent contained as more than 600 firefighters sought to bring it under control, incident commanders said Sunday. No injuries had been reported.

The fires in Southern California burned amid record-setting heat. Highs were expected to remain above 90 throughout the week.

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