Officials are preparing Trump for his big meeting with Putin by giving him 'tweet-length sentences' to talk about

In advance of President Donald Trump's highly anticipated bilateral meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday, intelligence officials created a list of "tweet-length sentences" summarizing key points Trump could discuss, The Los Angeles Times reported.

The meeting between the two leaders was initially going to be on the sidelines of this week's G-20 summit in Hamburg, Germany. But on Tuesday, the White House said the Trump-Putin meeting would instead be an official, bilateral sit-down.

To prepare Trump, intelligence officials put together a detailed psychological profile on Putin, a former KGB officer and Russian spy, The Times reported. The profile was included in a binder full of other materials to ready Trump. However, Trump frequently relies on in-person briefings to bring him up to speed, and he prefers shorter sentences and "killer graphics" as opposed to denser notes.

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Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin through the years
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Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin through the years
U.S. President Barack Obama extends his hand to Russian President Vladimir Putin during their meeting at the United Nations General Assembly in New York September 28, 2015. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Russian President Vladimir Putin (C) looks back at U.S. President Barack Obama (L) as they arrive with Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) at an Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit plenary session at the International Convention Center at Yanqi Lake, in Beijing, November 11, 2014. REUTERS/Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Pool (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin during the G8 Summit at Lough Erne in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland June 17, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd R) chats with Russia's President Vladimir Putin prior to a working session at the Group of 20 (G20) leaders summit in the Mediterranean resort city of Antalya, Turkey, November 16, 2015. REUTERS/Kayhan Ozer/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) and U.S. security advisor Susan Rice (2nd L) prior to the opening session of the Group of 20 (G20) Leaders summit summit in the Mediterranean resort city of Antalya, Turkey November 15, 2015. Man at 2nd R is unidentified. REUTERS/Cem Oksuz/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) talks with Russia's President Vladimir Putin as they gather for a family photo with fellow world leaders at the start of the G20 summit at the Regnum Carya Resort in Antalya, Turkey, November 15, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the APEC Economic Leadersâ Meeting in Lima, Peru November 20, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
A huge video screen on Sword Beach shows U.S. President Barack Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin as they arrive for the International 70th D-Day Commemoration Ceremony in Ouistreham June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of the Allied D-Day landings that helped turn the tables in World War Two. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY CONFLICT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Russian President Vladimir Putin holds out his arms as he walks past U.S. President Barack Obama (centre L) during a group photo at the G20 Summit in St. Petersburg September 6, 2013. Above Obama is British Prime Minister David Cameron, above Putin is German Chancellor Angela Merkel. At right is Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (RUSSIA - Tags: TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY BUSINESS POLITICS)
Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L) welcomes U.S. President Barack Obama before the first working session of the G20 Summit in Constantine Palace in Strelna near St. Petersburg, September 5, 2013. REUTERS/Grigory Dukor (RUSSIA - Tags: POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Russian President Vladimir Putin (L), British Prime Minister David Cameron (C) and U.S. President Barack Obama take part in a group photo for the G8 Summit in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland June 18, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS)
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in Los Cabos, Mexico, June 18, 2012. The leaders are in Los Cabos to attend the G20 summit. REUTERS/Jason Reed (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS)
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"I like bullets, or I like as little as possible," Trump told Axios before his inauguration in January. "I don't need, you know, 200-page reports on something that can be handled on a page."

In keeping with that, intelligence officials condensed the main points Trump could bring up with Putin into "tweet-length sentences."

Trump's approach to presidential briefings contrasts with that of prior presidents. After the November election, he said he did not need daily intelligence briefings.

"You know, I'm, like, a smart person. I don't have to be told the same thing in the same words every single day for the next eight years. Could be eight years — but eight years. I don't need that," he said.

And in May, Reuters reported that National Security Council officials strategically include Trump's name in "as many paragraphs as we can because he keeps reading if he's mentioned," according to one source.

Trump's meeting with Putin will come as multiple congressional and FBI investigations examine Russia's interference in the 2016 election and the Trump campaign's possible role in it. It's unclear whether Trump will bring up Russia's meddling during the bilateral meeting.

Homeland Security adviser Thomas Bossert told ABC's "This Week" on Sunday that the agenda had not been set, and national security adviser H.R. McMaster told reporters on Friday that "there's no specific agenda. It's really going to be whatever the president wants to talk about."

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