President Trump to visit Paris for Bastille Day at Macron's invitation: White House official

PARIS, June 28 (Reuters) - President Donald Trump will travel to France for the Bastille Day military celebrations on July 14, President Emmanuel Macron's office said on Wednesday, in a sign the allies are seeking to bolster ties despite differences over climate change.

The French presidency and White House said Trump had accepted an invitation to make the visit, which will also commemorate the U.S. entry into World War One 100 years ago.

"The two leaders will further build on the strong counter-terrorism cooperation and economic partnership between the two countries," the White House said in a statement.

RELATED: President Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron

11 PHOTOS
President Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron
See Gallery
President Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) shakes hands with French President Emmanuel Macron before a working lunch ahead of a NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Dejong/Pool
U.S. President Donald Trump greets French President Emmanuel Macron before a lunch ahead of a NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and France's President Emmanuel Macron shake hands before a working lunch ahead of a NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump jokes with French President Emmanuel Macron about their handshakes in front of NATO leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg (2ndR) and Belgium King Philippe (L), at the start of the NATO summit at their new headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A combination photo shows U.S. President Donald Trump (L) trying twice to let go of a handshake with France's President Emmanuel Macron (R) as Macron holds tight, before a working lunch ahead of a NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) meets French President Emmanuel Macron before a working lunch ahead of a NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Dejong/Pool
US President Donald Trump (R) talks with French President Emmanuel Macron as they attend the Summit of the Heads of State and of Government of the G7, the group of most industrialized economies, plus the European Union, on May 26, 2017 in Taormina, Sicily. The leaders of Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, the US and Italy will be joined by representatives of the European Union and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as well as teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, Nigeria and Tunisia during the summit from May 26 to 27, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN (Photo credit should read STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) meets French President Emmanuel Macron before a working lunch ahead of a NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Dejong/Pool
US President Donald Trump (L) and US First Lady Melania Trump (C) speak with French President Emmanuel Macron (R) as they arrive for a concert of the La Scala Philharmonic Orchestra during the Summit of the Heads of State and of Government of the G7, the group of most industrialized economies, plus the European Union, on May 26, 2017 at the ancient Greek Theater in Taormina, Sicily. The leaders of Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, the US and Italy will be joined by representatives of the European Union and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as well as teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, Nigeria and Tunisia during the summit from May 26 to 27, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / PHILIPPE WOJAZER (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE WOJAZER/AFP/Getty Images)
(L-R) Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May, French President Emmanuel Macron and US President Donald Trump attend the Summit of the Heads of State and of Government of the G7, the group of most industrialized economies, plus the European Union, on May 26, 2017 in Taormina, Sicily. The leaders of Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, the US and Italy will be joined by representatives of the European Union and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as well as teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, Nigeria and Tunisia during the summit from May 26 to 27, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN (Photo credit should read STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Macron appears to be broadly aligning his foreign policy with U.S. priorities of tackling terrorism while seeking better ties with Russia.

But the two leaders publicly clashed after Trump said he would pull out of a global accord on action to combat climate change.

"Beyond our differences on some subjects such as climate, it shows the strength and the links in our transatlantic ties and the convergence of views on counter-terrorism and our joint commitment in war zones," said a French diplomat.

RELATED: Trump handshakes

7 PHOTOS
Trump handshakes
See Gallery
Trump handshakes

Barack Obama, Former President of the United States

Wood says that the Nov. 10 handshake between Trump and Obama conveyed tension. She says that both parties seemed to adopt defensive postures while shaking hands.

"This shows deep lack of trust for each other," she said in an email. "As they shake hands, Trump pulls Obama in toward him, to show he is going to be the one in charge. If you look at their facial expressions as they shake hands, you will see both men have their lips tightly pressed together. And their chins are pulled up and wrinkled with distaste."

Photo credit: Getty

Neil Gorsuch, US Supreme Court nominee

On Jan. 31, Trump nominated Gorsuch to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court. After the judge's speech, the two shared a rather vigorous handshake.

Wood says that Gorsuch keeps his distance throughout the handshake. She adds that he seems to be in disbelief, "as his head position seems to indicate he can't believe Trump is doing this."

She says that Trump's tendency to pat people's hands comes across as an attempt to establish "alpha status."

Photo credit: Reuters 

Shinzo Abe, Prime Minister of Japan

When Trump and Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe sat down in the Oval Office on Feb. 10, things got kind of weird. Their handshake lasted nearly 20 seconds, and prompted Abe to look away with a surprised or bemused expression.

Wood says that Trump initially put himself in a subordinate and open position by offering his hand to Abe with his palm up, only to turn the tables and pull the prime minister in closer.

"Trump likes to break expectations, and you can see that he did by Abe's response," she said in an email.

Photo credit: Getty

Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

Wood says that Trudeau made an effort to look powerful when he encountered Trump during their Feb. 14 meting.

"Notice how he takes his non-shaking hand and grasps the outside of Trump's left shoulder," she said in an email. "He gives the faint appearance of power, but a real power move would have been to place his non-shaking palm on the shoulder of Trump and press down, or at least go higher on the arm. In this move his hand is too low and he gives more of a squeeze that shows more affection than power."

Photo credit: Getty

Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel

In this Feb. 15 interaction, Wood says that Netanyahu managed to maneuver out of Trump's lingering, jerking handshake. However, he couldn't avoid Trump's next move.

"Trump gets him, by moving towards him, invading his space and giving him a firm pat, pat, pat, on his upper back," Wood said in an email.

She says the move indicated that Trump was attempting to establish dominance over the Israeli Prime Minister.

Photo credit: Getty

Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany

Trump and Merkel shook hands both when she initially arrived at the White House on March 17 and later during their joint press conference.

However, the more talked-about interaction came about in the Oval Office, when Trump appeared to ignore Merkel when she asked if he wanted to shake hands.

"You see her do a forward movement," Wood said in an email. "Then, when he doesn't move to shake hands, she makes a little shoulder roll of discomfort, while he continues to face away and stay closed, when it is clearly time to face towards her and shake hands. He continues to face towards the cameras, his shoulders slumped slightly forward, and keeps his whole head turned down and away from her."

Wood says that the exchange indicated "disrespectful disregard" on the part of Trump.

Photo credit: Getty

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

After the United States, France is the biggest contributor to the coalition fighting Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria.

The July 14 festivities see thousands of men and women from France's army, navy and air force march down the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris. The U.S. military will this year march with French forces.

On July 14, 1789, crowds stormed the Bastille prison, where opponents of the monarchy were held, at the start of the French Revolution.

Plans by Trump to visit Britain have yet to be finalized despite an invitation by Prime Minister Theresa May when she met him in Washington in January.

The prospect of a visit has met opposition in Britain, prompting fears of angry protests, also a possibility in France.

"Donald Trump is violent and there's no reason for him being here," a far-left lawmaker and former French presidential candidate said on Wednesday.

"He is not welcome. That's clear," Jean-Luc Melenchon, leader of the France Unbowed movement, told Europe 1 radio.

(Additional reporting by Jean-Baptiste Vey and Steve Holland in Washington; Editing by Brian Love and Andrew Roche)

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.