4.5 billion-year-old meteorite found in back garden

Researchers at the Leiden's Naturalis Biodiversity Center announced on Monday, June 26, the discovery of a 1 pound meteorite that could help shed light on the origin of our solar system.

In a statement, the research center said several people in the Netherlands and Belgium witnessed on January 11 a fireball flying over the Dutch town of Broek in Waterland, making it the sixth meteorite to be found in the Netherlands in two centuries.

The extraterrestrial object hit the roof of a shed, shattering its wooden frame without causing any injury.

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Meteorites discovered across the globe through history
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Meteorites discovered across the globe through history

Marvin Kilgore, owner of the Fukang meteorite poses for photographs with the meteorite at Bonham's Auction house in New York, April 30, 2008. Widely acknowledged as the world's pre-eminent pallasitic meteorite found in the Gobi desert and thought to be as old as the solar system, the Fukang meteorite is expected to fetch as much as $2.7million at an auction by Bonham's in New York on April 30.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar)

A picture taken on June 26, 2017 shows a scientist from science museum Naturalis in Leiden, showing a meteorite type L6 chondrite which came down on January 11, 2017 in Broek in Waterland. Dutch scientists on Monday celebrated the discovery of only the sixth meteorite found in recent history in The Netherlands, which at 4.5-billion years old may hold clues to the birth of our solar system. The fist-sized meteorite, weighing about one pound, crashed through the roof of a shed in the small town of Broek in Waterland, just north of Amsterdam, in January probably traveling at the speed of a high-velocity train.

(KOEN VAN WEEL/AFP/Getty Images)

OREGON, UNITED STATES - 1920

Willamette's huge Meteorite

(Photo by Boyer/Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

Marvin Kilgore, owner of the Fukang meteorite, holds a polished etched slice of the meteorite at Bonham's Auction house in New York, April 30, 2008. Widely acknowledged as the world's pre-eminent pallasitic meteorite found in the Gobi desert and thought to be as old as the solar system, the Fukang meteorite is expected to fetch as much as $2.7million and the polished etched slice as much as $20,000 during an auction by Bonham's in New York on April 30.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar)

A local resident shows a fragment thought to be part of a meteorite collected in a snow covered field in the Yetkulski region outside the Urals city of Chelyabinsk February 24, 2013. A meteor that exploded over Russia's Ural mountains and sent fireballs blazing to earth has set off a rush to find fragments of the space rock which hunters hope could fetch thousands of dollars a piece.

(REUTERS/Andrei Romanov)

Pieces Of Meteorite.

(Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

Reporters gather around a piece of a meteorite, which according to local authorities and scientists, was lifted from the bottom of the Chebarkul Lake, placed on display in a local museum in Chelyabinsk, October 18, 2013. The meteorite exploded over central Russia in February 2013, raining fireballs over a vast area and causing a shock wave that smashed windows, damaged buildings and injured more than 1,000 people, according to local media.

(REUTERS/Andrey Tkachenko)

Colin Byrne (left), 3, and his brother Brandon, 7, look at the meteorite that recently fell from space onto a house in New Jersey. It was the centerpiece of a one-day exhibit at the Geography Museum at Rutgers University. The meteorite fell from the sky January 2nd and landed on the house of Srini Nageswaran in Freehold. It is now owned by Mr. Nageswaran, who has yet to decide what he will do with the meteorite, which one Rutgers research scientist says is 'as old as the solar system itself.'

(Photo by Michael Albans/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)

An object (C), which is a piece of a meteorite according to local authorities and scientists, is on display on the bank of the Chebarkul Lake, after it was lifted from the bottom of the lake, some 50 miles west of Chelyabinsk October 16, 2013. The meteorite exploded over central Russia in February 2013, raining fireballs over a vast area and causing a shock wave that smashed windows, damaged buildings and injured more than 1,000 people, according to local media.

(REUTERS/Anton Melnikov)

A piece of a meteorite is displayed in an old frame in the Museum of Domenico Agostinelli in Dragona, near Rome October 30, 2014. Agostinelli, 74, has a passion that has led him over the past 60 years to pick up and collect things of all types, from antique art to everyday objects of the past and present. His collection includes a 65-million-year-old dinosaur egg, meteor fragments, a car that once belonged to American mob boss Al Capone, a lock of hair of Italian national hero Giuseppe Garibaldi, toys, weapons, musical instruments of all kinds and many more.

(REUTERS/Tony Gentile)

This picture taken on February 8, 2016 at the State museum of natural History in Copenhagen shows the Meteorite that on February 6 flew over Denmark. A woman found pieces of the meteorite close to Ejby in Sealand, Denmark.

(EMIL HOUGAARD/AFP/Getty Images)

A piece of the Chelyabinsk meteorite is displayed before a hearing of the House Administration Committee in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill June 17, 2015 in Washington, DC. Famously caught by a number of video cameras, the meteorite fell to earth February 15, 2013 and caused a large amount of damage in the city of Chelyabinsk, Russia.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Marvin Kilgore, owner of the Fukang meteorite, places his hand on a section of the meteorite at Bonham's Auction house in New York, April 30, 2008. Widely acknowledged as the world's pre-eminent pallasitic meteorite found in the Gobi desert and thought to be as old as the solar system, the Fukang meteorite is expected to fetch as much as $2.7million at an auction by Bonham's in New York on April 30.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar)

A meteorite from the planet Mars at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center on September 15, 2015 in Houston, Texas.

(Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)

A piece of the Lorton Virginia Meteorite, which fell in Lorton, Virginia, on Monday, January 18, 2010, is seen on display from the National Museum of Natural History, before a House Administration Committee Hearing on 'The State of the Smithsonian' in the Longworth House Office Building on Wednesday, June 17, 2015. In the background is a piece of the meteorite that fell in Chelyabinsk, Russia, on February 15, 2013. Both meteorites are ordinary chondrites, which come from the atria belt between Mars and Jupiter.

(Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

This picture taken on September 19, 2014 shows dozens of meteorite specimens displayed under spotlights at Tong Xianping's showroom in Urumqi, in China's far-western Xinjiang region. One small cheque to a businessman, one giant leap for a meteorite: after journeys of millions of kilometres, rocks formed from the primordial soup of the solar system have landed on the walls of a Chinese showroom. 

(Photo credit should read GOH CHAI HIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Two guards and Ludovic Ferriere (R) of 'Confrerie Saint-Georges des Gardiens de la Meteorite d'Ensisheim poses during the press conference and exhibition preview at the Natural History Museum on November 15, 2013 in Vienna, Austria. The Ensisheim meteorite is a stony meteorite observed to fall on November 7, 1492.

(Photo by Manfred Schmid/Getty Images)

Kaliningrad, Russia, December 5 2002

A meteorite found in a sand pit near Mamonovo was placed on a marble pedestal in a street of Kaliningrad.

(Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images)

French meteorite seekers Carine Bidaut (R) and Bruno Fectay (L) pose with three fragments of meteorites from Mars, in Poligny, eastern France, on November 12, 2012.

(SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP/Getty Images)

A picture taken on June 26, 2017 shows a scientist from science museum Naturalis in Leiden, showing a meteorite type L6 chondrite which came down on January 11, 2017 in Broek in Waterland. Dutch scientists on Monday celebrated the discovery of only the sixth meteorite found in recent history in The Netherlands, which at 4.5-billion years old may hold clues to the birth of our solar system. The fist-sized meteorite, weighing about 500 grammes (one pound), crashed through the roof of a shed in the small town of Broek in Waterland, just north of Amsterdam, in January probably traveling at the speed of a high-velocity train.

(KOEN VAN WEEL/AFP/Getty Images)

Bendego meteorite in Brazil about 1784.

(Photo by Photo12/UIG/Getty Images)

Louis Maurel, a French private collector, holds a meteorite found in a field near Nice, France. He has a small private museum in Barr?me, Alpes-de-haute Provence, France. 

(Photo by Jonathan Blair/Corbis via Getty Images)

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Researchers believe the asteroid originated from the asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

Senior geology researcher Leo Kriegsman said it could provide key information about the formation of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago, as no stone this old can be found on earth.

Kriegsman described the meteorite as a 'L6 chondrite,' a common type of space rock.

Researchers at the Naturalis Biodiversity Center estimate that one meteorite of this size hits the Netherlands once in every 3-4 years, but that they are not always found.

The previous meteorite found in the Netherlands was 27 years ago in Glanerbrug, near the German border.

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