Japan is so worried about North Korea's missiles, there's a waiting list for bomb shelters

People in Japan have been rushing to buy nuclear bomb shelters and air purifiers because of a fear that North Korea may launch a missile attack without notice.

Now the country's suppliers are struggling to keep up with demand, forcing people onto a waiting list.

"It takes time and money to build a shelter," Nobuko Oribe, director of Oribe Seiki Seisakusho, the company that supplies most of Japan's shelters and purifiers, told Reuters.

In a typical year, the company receives six shelter orders. It received eight in April of this year alone. Oribe's company has also been getting non-stop orders for the purifiers in the last few months.

19 PHOTOS
Inside a nuclear bunker in Japan
See Gallery
Inside a nuclear bunker in Japan
Seiichiro Nishimoto, CEO of Shelter Co., wears a gas mask as he presents the model room for the company� nuclear shelters during an interview with Reuters in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
A toilet is pictured in Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter model room in the basement of its CEO Seiichiro Nishimoto's house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Seiichiro Nishimoto, CEO of Shelter Co., poses wearing a gas mask at a model room for the company� nuclear shelters in the basement of his house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Seiichiro Nishimoto, CEO of Shelter Co., demonstrates how to use the exit of Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter model room installed in the basement of his house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Seiichiro Nishimoto, CEO of Shelter Co., walks into a basement where the model room for the company� nuclear shelters is installed during an interview with Reuters in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
The house of Seiichiro Nishimoto, president of the Shelter Co., where the model room for the company� nuclear shelters is installed, is pictured in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Seiichiro Nishimoto, CEO of Shelter Co., poses in front of a blast door at the entrance of a model room for his company� nuclear shelters during an interview with Reuters in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Seiichiro Nishimoto, CEO of Shelter Co., demonstrates how to use a radiation-blocking air purifier in case of power outage at the model room for Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelters in the basement of his house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Emergency foods are seen in the model room of Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter in the basement of its CEO Seiichiro Nishimoto's house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Radiation-blocking air purifiers are seen in the model room of Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter in the basement of its CEO Seiichiro Nishimoto's house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Seiichiro Nishimoto, CEO of Shelter Co., demonstrates how to use a radiation-blocking air purifier in case of power outage at the model room for Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelters in the basement of his house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
A gas mask, a Geiger counter and emergency goods are seen in Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter model room in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Radiation-blocking air purifiers are seen in the model room of Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter in the basement of its CEO Seiichiro Nishimoto's house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
A blast door is seen at the entrance of Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter model room, placed in the basement of its CEO Seiichiro Nishimoto's house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
The entrance of Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter model room, which is placed in the basement of the company's CEO Seiichiro Nishimoto's house, is pictured in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Seiichiro Nishimoto, CEO of Shelter Co., poses wearing a gas mask at a model room for the company� nuclear shelters in the basement of his house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
The exit of Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter model room is pictured in the basement of its CEO Seiichiro Nishimoto's house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
Seiichiro Nishimoto, CEO of Shelter Co., poses wearing a gas mask at a model room for the company� nuclear shelters in the basement of his house in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

North Korea's test launches have been getting more sophisticated over the last year. In May, the country launched a missile that climbed to 1,240 feet and flew more than 500 miles during its half-hour flight. It was the highest and furthest missile test the country has ever pulled off.

Analysts have expressed concern that a missile launched at a lower trajectory could fly even further.

A critical consideration for Japan is the possibility the ballistic missiles will come equipped with warheads containing sarin nerve gas. In April, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced his concerns about chemical warfare.

Many people responded in panic, rushing out to buy provisions that would shield them from an attack. Oribe's shelters, which are some of the country's best-sellers, can be installed beneath a home and reportedly withstand Hiroshima-level bombs detonated 2,100 feet away.

26 PHOTOS
Satellite images of the Punggye-ri nuclear test site in North Korea
See Gallery
Satellite images of the Punggye-ri nuclear test site in North Korea
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - APRIL 2, 2017. Figure 1. Activity continues at the North Portal. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - APRIL 2, 2017. Figure 2. Possible new dumping observed at the North Portal spoil pile. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - APRIL 2, 2017. Figure 3. Probable personnel in formation or equipment in rows at the Main Administrative Area. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 30, 2017. Figure 1. No vehicles or trailers remain around the North Portal but well-worn paths are observed. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 30, 2017. Figure 2. No new dumping of material on the North Portal spoil pile. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 30, 2017. Figure 3. Small collection of crates or trailers seen in previous imagery has been removed. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 28, 2017. Figure 3B. Formations seen in the Main Administrative Area, similar to what was seen in lead up to 2013 nuclear test. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 28, 2017. Figure 2. Material dumped at the North Portal tailings pile. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - JANUARY 4, 2013. Figure 3A. Formations seen in the Main Administrative Area in lead up to 2013 nuclear test. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 28, 2017. Figure 1. Continued activity at the North Portal. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 25, 2017. Figure 1. Probable cabling and water drainage seen at the North Portal. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 19th, 2016: Figure 6: Excavation continued underground in the North Portal area suggesting more tests to come in the same tunnel complex directly under Mt. Mantap. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - JANUARY 5th, 2017: Figure 7: The North Portal spoil pile continued to expand into 2017, becoming increasingly broader. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - JANUARY 22nd, 2017: Figure 8: Late January 2017 imagery showing new spoil on top of recent snow. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 19th, 2016: Figure 9. A close-up of the North Portal spoil pile as it appeared in late October 2016. The unstable spoil can sometimes lead to accidents, as in this case of toppled rail cars downslope. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 12th, 2017: Figure 10. A close-up of the North Portal spoil pile from February 2017 shows that accumulations had begun move westward with a broadening of the top and bottom west side of the pile. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 1. DigitalGlobe imagery showing large shipping container or crate seen at the North Portal. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 2. DigitalGlobe imagery showing no changes to pattern and texture of tailings (spoil) pile at the North Portal. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 3. DigitalGlobe imagery showing a small vehicle present at the West Portal. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 4. DigitalGlobe imagery showing a truck present in the southern courtyard of the Main Administrative Area. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 5. DigitalGlobe imagery showing a truck present at the sites Command Center. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 6. DigitalGlobe imagery showing snow cleared at guard barrack and security checkpoint. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 24, 2016: Figure 2. No activity seen at the Sohae launch pad. Date: October 24, 2016. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 24, 2016: Figure 3. Environmental shed remains adjacent to the vertical engine test stand. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 29, 2016: Figure 1C. Increased activity around the North Portal throughout October. Date: October 29, 2016. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The company prices its purifiers and shelters based on the number of people they can service. Six-person purifiers cost $5,630, while 13-person purifiers run for more than $15,000.

"A year ago, we were getting maybe five calls a day about air purifiers, but it is thirty a day now", Shota Hayashi, a spokesman for Oribe Seiki Seisakusho, told the Telegraph.

Bomb shelters are even more costly. The largest model, a 13-person unit, goes for more than $223,000.

Japanese citizens that don't have access to a shelter have been told to find cover inside sturdy buildings or underground, if possible. The government has also warned to stay away from windows in the event of a blast.

NOW WATCH: What it's like living in North Korea — according to a North Korean defector

See Also:

SEE ALSO: 'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.