Poll: Trump's approval rating plummets after Senate releases health care bill

President Donald Trump's approval rating plummeted over the weekend as controversy continues to swirl around Senate Republican's revised health care bill.

SEE ALSO: Trump responds to Obama's criticism of Senate health care plan

Just 38 percent of Americans now say they approve of the job the president is doing in office, a drop of four points in just three days, according to the latest Gallup survey released on Sunday.

Trump's disapproval also increased by three points up to 57 percent.

After sinking as low as 37 percent a few weeks ago, Trump's numbers bounced back last week, reaching as high as 42 percent approval -- a near month-long high for the president.

Click through Trump's tweets from over the weekend:

7 PHOTOS
Trump tweets about Russia meddling in 2016 election
See Gallery
Trump tweets about Russia meddling in 2016 election
Since the Obama Administration was told way before the 2016 Election that the Russians were meddling, why no action? Focus on them, not T!
Just out: The Obama Administration knew far in advance of November 8th about election meddling by Russia. Did nothing about it. WHY?
Since the Obama Administration was told way before the 2016 Election that the Russians were meddling, why no action? Focus on them, not T!
Obama Administration official said they "choked" when it came to acting on Russian meddling of election. They didn't want to hurt Hillary?
Just out: The Obama Administration knew far in advance of November 8th about election meddling by Russia. Did nothing about it. WHY?
Democrats slam GOP healthcare proposal as Obamacare premiums & deductibles increase by over 100%. Remember keep your doctor, keep your plan?
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

However, the president's approval rating began to dive again following the backlash that erupted after Senate Republicans released their revised Obamacare replacement bill.

Not only has the bill faced harsh criticism from Democratic lawmakers, but top Republicans in the Senate including Rand Paul, Ted Cruz and Mike Lee all revealed in a joint statement they were "not ready to vote for this bill."

"There's no way we should be voting on this next week. No way," Republican Sen. Ron Johnson said on Sunday. "I have a hard time believing Wisconsin constituents or even myself will have enough time to properly evaluate this, for me to vote for a motion to proceed. So I've been encouraging leadership, the White House, anybody I can talk to for quite some time, let's not rush this process. Let's have the integrity to show the American people what it is, show them the truth."

The president, however, says he remains confident health care reform will get done, and soon.

"I don't think they're that far off. Famous last words, right? But I think we're going to get there," Trump said in an interview Sunday on FOX News' "Fox & Friends."

"Can't promise. I think we're going to get there."

13 PHOTOS
A look at the Senate's all-male health care working group
See Gallery
A look at the Senate's all-male health care working group
U.S. Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) (L) and Senator David Perdue (R-GA) (R) unveil legislation aimed at curbing legal immigration by halving the number of legal immigrants admitted into the United States, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. February 7, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senator Cory Gardner (R-CO) smiles after he was ceremonially sworn-in by Vice President Joseph Biden in the Old Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington January 6, 2015. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEADSHOT)
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks during a media briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. April 25, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-OH) speaks during a session called "The New Congress" at the Wall Street Journal's CEO Council meeting in Washington December 2, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/File Photo
U.S. Senator Pat Toomey (R-PA) speaks to the 38th annual Conservative Political Action Conference meeting in Washington DC, U.S. February 10, 2011. REUTERS/Larry Downing/File Photo
U.S. Senator John Thune addresses the media during the 2017 "Congress of Tomorrow" Joint Republican Issues Conference in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. January 25, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
U.S. Senator John Cornyn (R-TX)questions Supreme Court nominee judge Neil Gorsuch during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington March 21, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) questions Supreme Court nominee judge Neil Gorsuch during his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington March 21, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Lamar Alexander speaks during Rep. Tom Price's (R-GA) nomination hearing to be Health and Human Services secretary in Washington, U.S., January 18, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) during the second day of confirmation hearings on Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) nomination to be U.S. attorney general in Washington, U.S. January 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) speaks at a rally for nominee Neil Gorsuch outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S. March 29, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
UNITED STATES - APRIL 4: Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks as Senate Republican leaders hold their media availability focusing on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch as associate justice of the Supreme Court following their policy lunch on Tuesday, April 4, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.