At women-only salon in Brooklyn, Muslim-Americans prepare for Eid

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Brooklyn salon prepares Muslims for Eid holiday
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Brooklyn salon prepares Muslims for Eid holiday
A Muslim woman wears her scarf after getting her hair cut and dried at the Le Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 23, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Farah Ibrahim, a 25 year old Palestinian American Muslim, stands outside Le Jemalik Salon and Boutique after getting her hair dyed ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Make-up brushes dry after being washed at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Halal nail polish is displayed at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Henna is applied to the hands and arms of a Muslim female customer at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
A Muslim woman uses her phone while waiting for a family member to receive treatment at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Farah Ibrahim (C), a 25 year old Palestinian American Muslim, watches as henna is applied on the hands of a customer ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
A raffle box for beauty supplies, with proceeds going to a charity, is seen at the entrance of Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Muslim woman Khoda Kheir, 30, receives a Halal eyebrow treatment at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Muslim female customers are seen inside the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 23, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Hair dye rests as Muslim female customers await treatment at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Huda Quhshi, owner and cosmetologist at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique, cuts the hair of a Muslim woman ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
A Muslim woman picks out a color to get highlights in her hair at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Muslim woman Sumiyah Ahmed, 22, looks at herself in the mirror after receiving a Halal eyebrow treatment at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 22, 2017. Picture taken on June 22, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Palestinian American Muslim woman Raneem Ayesh, 16, has her hair washed at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
Huda Quhshi, owner and cosmetologist at the Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique, dyes the hair of a Muslim woman ahead of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 21, 2017. Picture taken on June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Gabriela Bhaskar
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NEW YORK (Reuters) - Nevien Shehadeh, 19, was one of many Muslim women who chose Le'Jemalik Salon and Boutique in New York's borough of Brooklyn on Friday to prepare for the Eid al-Fitr holiday.

The beauty salon, designed by owner Huda Quhshi to cater mostly to Muslim women, opened in January in the Bay Ridge neighborhood of Brooklyn.

"I actually only started wearing the hijab one year ago," said Shehadeh, an undergraduate studying math and economics at Fordham University in New York.

"I always wanted to, but I wasn't ready. It was actually during Ramadan last year, one week before Eid that I had this feeling to wear the hijab."

SEE ALSO: President Trump nixes decades-long White House tradition of Ramadan dinner

Shehadeh, a Palestinian-American, was with her two sisters, Shireen, 26, and Nisrien, 18, and aunt, Najah, 37. They reminisced about meeting Quhshi two years ago when the beauty entrepreneur was hired to do make-up at a family wedding.

Quhshi, 37, said that as a Yemeni-American whose cultural norms often barred women from the workplace, she did not think creating a space where conservative Muslim women could receive beauty services in a comfortable environment was possible.

Between Wednesday and Friday, Quhshi said she received 48 customers for Eid services.

"Most salons aren't all women," said Shehadeh, who plans to celebrate Eid on a Staten Island beach with her family on Sunday, marking the end of Islam's holy month of Ramadan. "Here we feel comfortable. We're not paranoid of someone walking in."

About 3.3 million Muslims live in the United States, according to Pew Research Center data, many of whom will celebrate Eid, one of the two most important festivals of the Islamic calendar.

"The beginning of Ramadan was really quiet. It was so slow. It was to the point that I thought of closing for Ramadan," Quhshi said.

"Then, all of a sudden, we got so many bookings that we have had to turn people away."

See more from the Eid holiday in New York City:

17 PHOTOS
Muslims commemorate Ramadan in New York City
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Muslims commemorate Ramadan in New York City
Yusra Udayni, a Yemeni-American, takes photos of Eid decorations in her home in celebration of the Muslim holiday Eid al-Fitr in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Yemeni-American Muslim Hajar Udayni sprays perfume on her son Feras, 4, as they prepare for the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday at home in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Yemeni-American Muslim Iman Udayni turns to look from the driver's seat at a pair of earrings her daughter Hajar Udayni received as a gift from her husband in celebration of the Eid al-Fitr holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Yemeni-American Muslim Yusra Udayni prepares to leave her home to take part in Eid al-Fitr Islamic prayers in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Eid greetings in Arabic are displayed on the front door of a Yemeni-American Muslim family in celebration of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Yemeni-American Muslim boy Salman Udayni, 5, plays with balloons with the words "Eid Mubarak" in celebration of the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday at his home in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Muslim women take part in Eid al-Fitr prayers in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Yemeni-American Muslim sisters Hajar Udayni (L) and Sara Udayni Udayni take part in Eid al-Fitr prayers in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Muslims exit Bensonhurst Park after taking part in Eid al-Fitr prayers in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Yemeni-American Muslim boy Salman Udayni, 5, picks out his Eid gifts at Toys "R" Us after the family took part in Eid al-Fitr prayers in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Yemeni-American Muslim Abdul Udayni (L) helps his sister Hajar Udayni prepare a breakfast feast to celebrate the Eid al-Fitr holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Yemeni-American Muslim Talal Radman embraces his wife Yusra Udayni as the family return home after taking part in Eid al-Fitr prayers in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
The Yemeni-American Muslim Udayni family gather around for a large Eid breakfast, made up of traditional Yemeni dishes, to celebrate Eid al-Fitr holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Eid greetings hang as decorations in the home of the Yemeni-American Muslim Udayni family on the Eid al-Fitr holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Eid greetings, which wish wellness for the year, make up decorations around sweets and Arabic coffee at the home of the Yemeni-American Muslim Udayni family on the Eid al-Fitr holiday in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid
Yemeni-American Muslim Hajar Udayni adjusts her hijab on the Eid al-Fitr Islamic holiday at her sister's home in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kholood Eid TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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When women arrive at the salon, they are invited to sit on a circular, ivory couch studded with jewels.

Saloon doors lead to a private space where customers post-up for pampering in peach and white chairs.

Some get their hair cut and colored. Others have their make-up done or hijab styled by Quhshi and her staff of six. A pedicure station operates as a henna haven.

Shehadeh admired her haircut and blow-out in the ornate mirror.

"We're here to get pampered for the holiday," Shehadeh said. "Even though we don't show our hair, it feels good to do it for yourself."

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