Trump is being sued for not preserving his tweets, other communications

President Trump and the Executive Office of the President are being sued over the handling of official communications, reports Politico.

The lawsuit, filed on Thursday by two watchdog groups—the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, or CREW, and the National Security Archive—cites the President Records Act and other statutes in accusing Trump and his staff of "seek[ing] to evade transparency and government accountability."

One of their main arguments claims that the White House's "communications practices...knowingly prevent the proper preservation of records..."

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Scenes from Trump's 'Make America Great Again' rally in Iowa
A supporter holds a sign during a rally with President Donald Trump at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
Supporters cheer as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
A supporter cheers as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
U.S. President Donald Trump takes the stage for a rally at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
Victoria Merfeld, 22, of Bernard, Iowa, attends a rally with U.S. President Donald Trump at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
U.S. President Donald Trump waves to the crowd following a rally at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
Supporters cheer at a rally with U.S. President Donald Trump at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Scott Morgan
A fan doffs his hat as U.S. President Donald Trump holds a rally with supporters at an arena in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
The word 'resist' appears on the arm of a protestor with a group who interrupted the speech of President Donald Trump, not pictured, during a rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. Russia canceled talks with a top U.S. official to protest the latest sanctions punishing Russian companies and individuals over the conflict in Ukraine, in a fresh setback for Trump's bid to improve ties with President Vladimir Putin's government. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Attendees listen as President Donald Trump, not pictured, speaks during a rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. Russia canceled talks with a top U.S. official to protest the latest sanctions punishing Russian companies and individuals over the conflict in Ukraine, in a fresh setback for Trump's bid to improve ties with President Vladimir Putin's government. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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According to the brief, these inappropriate actions include the use of "certain email messaging applications that destroy the contents of messages as soon as they are read, without regard to whether the messages are presidential records."

The group also points to some of Trump's tweets which have been deleted and at least one report which claimed that White House aides may have wiped their phones of information pertinent to ongoing government investigations.

As CREW's Executive Director Noah Bookbinder said in a press release, "The American people not only deserve to know how their government is making important decisions, it's the law. By deleting these records, the White House is destroying essential historical records."

However, an unnamed White House official denied the claims, telling Newsweek, that the Trump administration prohibits the use of such apps and "works diligently to ensure all staff comply with The Presidential Records Act."

The other primary argument in the brief involves the consolidation of power within the White House, with the plaintiffs contending that "Executive Orders are cloaked in secrecy, preventing federal agencies from complying with their statutory duties under the Federal Records Act...the Administrative Procedure Act...and the Freedom of Information Act."

The group is asking the court to validate the claims being made and force Trump and his office to comply with the rules.

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