Saudi Arabia names Mohammed bin Salman as new crown prince

Saudi Arabia named Mohammed bin Salman, the king's son and the country's defense minister, to be next in line in to the throne, state media announced Wednesday.

The 31-year-old replaces Muhammad bin Nayef as the heir apparent to King Salman who assumed the throne in January 2015.

Bin Nayef, a nephew of the 81-year-old king, was also removed as deputy premier and interior minister. Bin Nayef was for years the country's counter-terrorism chief who put down a brutal al-Qaeda bombing campaign.

Prince Mohammed will remain defense minister, the official Saudi Press Agency reported.

No reason for the replacement was immediately announced, but Prince Mohammed, not Bin Nayef, was chosen to visit President Donald Trump at the White House in March. That meeting that was widely hailed as a success in Saudi Arabia.

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Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (R) attends a meeting between Emir of Kuwait Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah and Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, June 6, 2017. Bandar Algaloud/Courtesy of Saudi Royal Court/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with Saudi Deputy Crown Prince and Defence Minister Mohammed bin Salman during a meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, May 30, 2017. REUTERS/Pavel Golovkin/Pool
Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman waves as he meets with Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, April 11, 2017. Bandar Algaloud/Courtesy of Saudi Royal Court/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (L) welcomes Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince and Minister of Defense Mohammed bin Salman at the Pentagon in Washington, U.S., March 16, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump and Saudi Deputy Crown Prince and Minister of Defense Mohammed bin Salman meet at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Saudi Deputy Crown Prince and Minister of Defense Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., March 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
A picture taken on June 6, 2017 shows a poster of Saudi King Salman (C), Crown Prince and Interior Minister Mohammed bin Nayef (R) and Deputy Crown Prince and Defence Minister Mohammed bin Salman placed on on the offices of the Saudi national airline carrier in Riyadh. Arab nations including Saudi Arabia and Egypt cut ties with Qatar accusing it of supporting extremism, in the biggest diplomatic crisis to hit the region in years. / AFP PHOTO / FAYEZ NURELDINE (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)
US Defence Secretary James Mattis meets Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (R) in Riyadh on April 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / JONATHAN ERNST (Photo credit should read JONATHAN ERNST/AFP/Getty Images)
US Defence Secretary James Mattis bids farewell to Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (C-R) following their meeting in Riyadh on April 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / JONATHAN ERNST (Photo credit should read JONATHAN ERNST/AFP/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - AUGUST 30: Saudi Defence Minister and Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Vice Premier of China Zhang Gaoli (not seen) lead 1st China - Saudi Arabia High-Level Cooperation Council meeting in Beijing, China on August 29, 2016. (Photo by Pool / Bandar Algaloud/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA - APRIL 5: (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY MANDATORY CREDIT - 'BANDAR ALGALOUD / SAUDI KINGDOM COUNCIL / HANDOUT' - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) British Prime Minister Theresa May (R) meets with Defense Minister of Saudi Arabia Mohammad Bin Salman Al Saud (L) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on April 5, 2017. (Photo by Bandar Algaloud / Saudi Kingdom Council / Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) shakes hands with Saudi Deputy Crown Prince and Defence Minister Mohammed bin Salman during a meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow on May 30, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Pavel Golovkin (Photo credit should read PAVEL GOLOVKIN/AFP/Getty Images)
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Angered and disappointed by President Barack Obama's rapprochement with its main rival Iran, the Saudi government has embraced Trump.

The new crown prince is often depicted as a reform-minded technocrat devoted to building the kingdom's economy beyond the oil industry.

He spear-headed Saudi Vision 2030 — which was unveiled in April 2016. It aimed at transforming the world's largest oil producer into a "global investment powerhouse," a logistical hub for three continents and commodities exporter.

Related: Young Prince Shakes Up Ultra-Conservative Saudi Arabia

As defense minister, bin Salman has pursued a war in neighboring Yemen, leading forces from other Arab states to put down a rebellion by Iran-linked Houthi rebels. Rising civilian Yemeni casualties have garnered international condemnation of Saudi Arabia.

Bin Salman has been unbending on Iran, which the Saudi government views as an existential threat to royal rule. He has rejected the possibility of dialogue with Tehran.

The prince has pursued a pointedly public profile — an unusual move among typically private royals — making high-profile international trips and giving interviews to Western news outlets.

Last year, Prince Mohammed visited Silicon Valley to sell his vision of market-oriented reforms and a transformation of the kingdom's economy and society.

Related: One Saudi Prince Gets Lunch With Trump, His Rival Gets a Medal

"This guy is all about change," Saudi analyst Ahmad Al-Ibrahim told NBC News in November as Prince Mohammed was promoting modernization of Saudi Arabia's economy as a way to modernize the desert kingdom's ultra-conservative social structure.

The prince has "huge ambitions and a Western mindset that he wants to apply to Saudi Arabia," Al-Ibrahim added.

While often cast as a westernizing modernizer, human rights defenders view his amassing power with skepticism.

Saudi Arabia is an absolute monarchy and continues to arrest, try and convict peaceful dissidents, according to Human Rights Watch. Women and religious minorities are still "systematically" discriminated against, it adds.

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