Four planets will be visible during the Great American Eclipse

As the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse gets closer and closer, space junkies from across the country (and the world) are making preparations and travel arrangements for the once in a lifetime celestial event.

Dubbed the "Great American Eclipse," the mind-blowing experience's last comparable event occurred a century ago.

But, depending upon where you go, there may be another reason to look forward to it... or four.

Find out the states where you can see the total solar eclipse of 2017

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States where you can see the total solar eclipse of 2017
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States where you can see the total solar eclipse of 2017

Salem's the first sizable U.S. city with a chance to catch the eclipse when it hits Oregon.

Source: NASA

The eclipse will hit residents in Idaho next, with an opportunity to see totality in Idaho Falls. In Boise? Drive north a bit for your chance at totality.

Source: NASA

The eclipse sweeps across most of Wyoming, with Casper perfectly placed along the center of the path -- which means the eclipse will last longer there than on the outer edges.

Source: NASA

In Montana, but don't want to leave the state to get your eclipse fix? Totality will be visible from a tiny sliver of the Southwest corner of the state, but it's probably easier to just drive all the way to Idaho or Wyoming instead.

Source: NASA

Plenty of Nebraskans will have the chance to catch totality -- as the moon's shadow passes from the northwest corner of the state to the southeast corner.

Source: NASA

Like Montana, the total eclipse path will scrape across the tiniest portion of Iowa, but again, your best bet will likely be to travel into a state to your south or west instead. 

Source: NASA

You can catch the total eclipse from Kansas too if you head up to the northeast corner.

Source: NASA

Folks in Kansas City will get to see the total eclipse in Missouri, along with those in Columbia as it heads southeast across the state. St. Louis residents might need to drive a bit to see the total show.

Source: NASA

Residents of southern Illinois will get a total eclipse treat too, but anyone north of Belleville will need to drive to catch the big sight.

Source: NASA

Most folks in southwest Kentucky will get a chance to see the moon's shadow too.

Source: NASA

The eclipse will sweep across a big swath of Tennessee next, hitting Nashville and sweeping between Knoxville and Chattanooga.

Source: NASA

The northeast corner of Georgia is in the eclipse's path too. 

Source: NASA

Only a handful of North Carolinians will be able to see the total eclipse from their homes, as it hits a tiny portion of the southwest corner of the state.

Source: NASA

Source: NASA

Check out the entire eclipse's path!

Source: NASA

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In areas that will see the complete total eclipse, star gazers will be able to catch a glimpse of four planets: Mercury, Mars, Venus and Jupiter. To get the full eclipse experience, you'll probably do best heading up to a location along the 70-mile path spanning from Oregon to South Carolina.

That Monday, the moon will completely block the sun's face for up to three minutes as the sun's corona, or outer atmosphere, radiates around the moon.

Boise, Idaho, Kansas City and Nashville rest among a number of areas along the eclipse's path of totality that observers will be able to see the planets.

SEE ALSO: Everything you need to know about the great American eclipse of 2017

According to The Denver Channel, Jupiter will be visible to sky watchers positioned under the eastern sky. Venus will be visible just toward the western edge of the sun's halo, and Mercury and Mars will be seen even closer to the sun and moon.

In areas experiencing a partial solar eclipse, observers will have to wait until the sun sets for Jupiter to be visible in the night sky.

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