Scientists share photos of familiar-looking 'peanut worm'

Australian researchers from Museum Victoria and the CSIRO, the nation's scientific research agency, shared a photo of something lurking deep beneath the ocean -- and Twitter can't stop talking about it.

Aside from the usual horrific-looking faceless fish, they found the "peanut worm," which bears a shocking resemblance to ... well, see for yourself.

Twitter users then rushed to make the same joke over and over again, pretty much:

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Twitter users joke about the 'peanut worm'
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Twitter users joke about the 'peanut worm'
@IBTimesUK Ariel's "Dinglehopper" 😂 https://t.co/MUEmesMOch
@rainecloudss @RodrickHoward_ @IBTimesUK Now that's a whole other thread... https://t.co/hjjvGdSIg6
@IBTimesUK It kinda looks like an arm
@drmattdambrosio @IBTimesUK @countmystars https://t.co/gtM0ygNEtX
@StrengthBuild @Sim__Simma https://t.co/nGZKFPEFcA
@IBTimesUK @J_Bloodworth Hmmm, seems familiar. Bigger than I remember, tho.
@festivating @killstvz @AdeX__ @softmocha @IBTimesUK https://t.co/WIc5rbaNco
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The sipuncula is known as the peanut worm because it resembles the shell of a peanut, according to University of California's Museum of Paleontology.

Peanut worm (Sipuncula or Sipunculida), a marine worm; Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.Photo credit: Getty

The sipuncula consist of a group of 320 different species that are found in shallow waters or in crevasses between rocks -- and they usually don't look quite so ... phallic.

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