LGBT activists on Trump's impact: 'We are at war'

President Donald Trump's relationship with the LGBT community is complicated.

During last year's election Trump positioned himself as a pro-LGBT Republican. On the campaign trail Trump promised he'd be "better for the gays" than his 2016 election opponent Hillary Clinton. The president even made history by mentioning LGBT issues during his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio.

SEE ALSO: Trump called out for not proclaiming June as 'Pride Month'

But since Trump took office many voices in the community say their rights and livelihood have come under fire.

"We are at war," Ken Kidd, an organizer with direct action group Rise and Resist, tells AOL.com.

"We are under siege. They picked a fight with us and Republicans would love nothing more than for us to retrench and go backward."

Click through LGBTQ history makers:

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LGBTQ history makers
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LGBTQ history makers

Bayard Rustin (1912-1987) - Civil rights activist and openly gay man. He served as an advisor to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and organized the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

(Photo by Patrick A. Burns/New York Times Co./Getty Images)

James Baldwin (1924 – 1987) - Civil rights activist and author from Harlem. He wrote his second novel in 1956 -- "Giovanni's Room." The work dealt explicitly with homosexuality and was published at a time when few other writers dared to publish gay-themed works, according to LGBT History Month

(Photo by Robert Elfstrom/Villon Films/Gety Images)

Alan Turing (1912-1954) - British mathematician whose work is widely acknowledged as the foundation of research in artificial intelligence.

(Photo by Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images)

Moms Mabley (1894 – 1975) - Lesbian stand up comedian who starred in films and frequently headlined at the Apollo Theater. 

(Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

Marsha P. Johnson (1945-1992) - A famous transgender woman and LGBT activist, Johnson was a veteran of the Stonewall Riot in New York City. She and Sylvia Rivera founded STAR: Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries in 1970 to push for trans rights and offer shelter for homeless transgender teens.

(REUTERS/Diana Davies-NYPL/Handout)

Josephine Baker (1906 – 1975) - Singer, dancer and actress who became very popular in France in the 20s. She was also a civil rights activist. Baker was bisexual -- she married and divorced several men, as well as carrying on affairs with women, including Mexican artist Frida Kahlo.

(Photo by ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Harvey Milk (1930-1978) - First openly gay man to be elected to public office in California when he served on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1977.

(Photo by Bettmann via Getty Images)

Alexis Arquette (1969 – 2016) - Transgender actress who transitioned to female in her 30s. She is known for her roles in films like “The Wedding Singer” and “Last Exit to Brooklyn.”

(Photo by Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic)

Sally Ride (1951-2012) - America’s first woman in space waited until her death to tell the world that she was gay. The NASA astronaut’s obituary referred to “her partner of 27 years.” After Ride’s death, her sister wrote in an essay that she hopes “it makes it easier for kids growing up gay that they know that another one of their heroes was like them.”

(Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)

Lesley Gore (1946 – 2015) - The famous American singer, most known for her hits “It’s My Party” and “You Don’t Own Me,” was openly gay.

(Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

Tennessee Williams (1912-1983) - Williams was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright, who wrote some of Broadway's most successful shows -- including 'A Streetcar Named Desire' and 'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.' Several of his works were adapted into Oscar-winning films, starring Marlon Brando and Elizabeth Taylor, among other famous actors at the time. 

Williams was in a relationship with his longtime partner, Frank Merlo, for 14 years until Merlo's death in 1963. 

Matthew Shepard (1976 – 1998) - Shepard was a student at the University of Wyoming when he was killed in a horrific hate crime. At the time, hate crime laws did not extend to the LGBTQ community. His death sparked a nationwide debate and ultimately led to the passing of new legislation -- the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act (2009)

(Photo credit ANDREW CUTRARO/AFP/Getty Images)

Audre Lorde (1934 – 1992) - She considered herself “a black feminist lesbian mother poet.” She was also a vocal civil rights activist and leader for the advancement of the LGBT community.

(Photo by Robert Alexander/Archive Photos/Getty Images)

Nancy Kulp (1921 – 1991) - Lesbian actress most known for her role as Miss Jane Hathaway in the popular ‘60s sitcom "The Beverly Hillbillies."

(Photo by Bettmann via Getty Images)

Rock Hudson (1925 – 1985) - The legendary actor kept his sexuality a secret at the height of his Hollywood fame in the '60s. Hudson was diagnosed with AIDS in July 1985 and revealed he was gay in a press release just months before he died in October of the same year. 

His death is credited with fueling Elizabeth Taylor's AIDS advocacy. 

Alvin Ailey (1931 – 1989) - American choreographer and LGBT activist, Ailey formed the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater in New York City in 1958. His dance company welcomed and celebrated black dancers who were frequently ignored by major companies. 

American drag queen and actor Divine (1945-1988, born Harris Glenn Milstead) - Milstead, who identified as male, found mainstream success with his drag persona -- Divine. Divine's biggest hit was in 1988's 'Hairspray,' playing the role of Edna Turnbald. 

At the peak of his fame, he died of an enlarged heart. 

(Photo by Tim Boxer/Getty Images)

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In February, Trump rolled back protections for transgender students which allowed them to use bathrooms corresponding with their gender identity. The move sparked outrage and prompted multiple protests across the country filled with chants of "Trans equality now."

Another move viewed by many in the LGBT community as a blatant attack was when the president rolled back LGBT protections in May by signing an executive order relative to religious liberty that pro-LGBT organizations say will only open the doors for further discrimination against gay Americans.

Trump broke with tradition at the start of Pride Month this year by not issuing a proclamation, a move Ashley Broadway-Mack, president of the American Military Partner Association, called "deeply disappointing."

But according to Kidd things could be a lot worse and just might be heading that direction.

"The only reason that things aren't worse now is because of the resistance," Kidd said, touting the work from activists and concerned citizens who are pushing back on the Trump administration through protests and social media activism.

"The only reason the anti-LGBT agenda has not gone further is because the LGBT community and our allies have been vigilant, vocal and on the watch ... we are not going to take it," the longtime New York City activist continued. "But it will absolutely will get worse," Kidd said. "Our community is under siege since no time since Stone Wall."

Click through images from LGBTQ protests outside Ivanka Trump's home:

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LGBTQ protest outside Ivanka Trump's home
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LGBTQ protest outside Ivanka Trump's home
Protestors rally during the Queer Dance Party for Climate Change outside the home of Assistant to the President Ivanka Trump in Washington, D.C., U.S., April 1, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Protestors rally during the Queer Dance Party for Climate Change outside the home of Assistant to the President Ivanka Trump in Washington, D.C., U.S., April 1, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Protestors rally during the Queer Dance Party for Climate Change outside the home of Assistant to the President Ivanka Trump in Washington, D.C., U.S., April 1, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
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Scholar and Director of Graduate Studies for Political Science at Columbia University Justin Phillips agrees with Kidd, telling AOL.com that while "it hasn't been as bad yet as I feared ... I expect things to get a lot worse, not better."

According to Phillips, it's likely Trump's fledgling approval numbers and popularity will be the catalyst for him to start making more aggressive and sweeping anti-LGBT moves.

"When politicians -- be them governors or presidents -- become unpopular they often they turn to rally their base and their core supporters. I could see [Trump] becoming more conservative on these issues as he becomes less popular."

According to Phillips, as the president slips in the polls it becomes more likely that he will take action to secure his base made up of social conservatives among other groups.

"I don't see Donald Trump making a move to the middle in American politics," said adding that if Trump were to utilize a "rally-the-base strategy" it could lead him to push more "draconian executive orders ... which is what I expect and fear."

In order to prevent the LGBT movement from losing ground after the most pro-LGBT White House in history under President Barack Obama, veteran activist Ken Kidd says leaders like himself need to remain involved and continue to make their voices heard.

"Harvey Milk said that the one thing we need to do is come out. This is a sort of coming out 2.0.," Kidd said. "We need to be more visible than we've ever been. We need to be more diligent than we've ever been. We need to be more educated and we need to be more thoughtful than we've ever been."

"We should celebrate the heritage of Pride and the gains that we've made. But we also need to stand and fight to hang onto them and fight for our future."

Images from LGBTQ Pride month 2017:

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LGBTQ Pride month 2017
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LGBTQ Pride month 2017
BIRMINGHAM, UNITED KINGDOM - MAY 27: Thousands of members of the LGBTQ community gathered today for the Birmingham Pride parade on May 27, 2017 in Birmingham, England. The Birmingham Pride is an annual festival for the LGBTQ community usually taking place over the Spring Bank Holiday. The event begins with a parade from Victoria Square in the city center to the Gay Village in Hurst Street. PHOTOGRAPH BY Jim Wood / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftimages.com (Photo credit should read Jim Wood / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
A picture taken on June 5, 2017 shows a new green pedestrian crossing symbol depicting a same-sex couple in Madrid as the capital will host this year's World Pride festival from June 23 to July 2. / AFP PHOTO / OSCAR DEL POZO (Photo credit should read OSCAR DEL POZO/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on June 5, 2017 shows a new green pedestrian crossing symbol depicting a same-sex couple in Madrid as the capital will host this year's World Pride festival from June 23 to July 2. / AFP PHOTO / OSCAR DEL POZO (Photo credit should read OSCAR DEL POZO/AFP/Getty Images)
QUEENS, NY - JUNE 4: Members of New York City's gay, lesbian and transgender community prepare to march in the Queens Gay Pride parade on June 4, 2017 in Jackson Heights, Queens. The parade route down Northern Boulevard travels through a working class immigrant neighborhood. (Photo by Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images)
QUEENS, NY - JUNE 4: Members of New York City's gay, lesbian and transgender community prepare to march in the Queens Gay Pride parade on June 4, 2017 in Jackson Heights, Queens. The parade route down Northern Boulevard travels through a working class immigrant neighborhood. (Photo by Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images)
<> on September 29, 2016 in New York City.
BIRMINGHAM, UNITED KINGDOM - MAY 27: Thousands of members of the LGBTQ community gathered today for the Birmingham Pride parade on May 27, 2017 in Birmingham, England. The Birmingham Pride is an annual festival for the LGBTQ community usually taking place over the Spring Bank Holiday. The event begins with a parade from Victoria Square in the city center to the Gay Village in Hurst Street. PHOTOGRAPH BY Jim Wood / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftimages.com (Photo credit should read Jim Wood / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
BIRMINGHAM, UNITED KINGDOM - MAY 27: Thousands of members of the LGBTQ community gathered today for the Birmingham Pride parade on May 27, 2017 in Birmingham, England. The Birmingham Pride is an annual festival for the LGBTQ community usually taking place over the Spring Bank Holiday. The event begins with a parade from Victoria Square in the city center to the Gay Village in Hurst Street. PHOTOGRAPH BY Jim Wood / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftimages.com (Photo credit should read Jim Wood / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
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