Sailor thought dead after falling overboard was actually hiding out in the ship's engine room

A sailor on the USS Shiloh who was presumed dead after falling overboard was actually hiding out in one of the ship's engine rooms for the past week, David Larter of Navy Times reports.

Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Peter Mims was thought to have fallen off the Shiloh roughly 180 miles east of Okinawa, Japan on June 8. The man overboard incident triggered a massive search by both US and Japanese personnel that spanned 5,500 square miles.

Mims was presumed dead after three days of fruitless searching, which was the second such incident in recent days, after another sailor fell off the USS Normandy.

The Navy's 7th Fleet said in a statement on its website that Mims was found alive onboard the ship. The service said he would be transferred to the USS Ronald Reagan for medical care.

"We are thankful to have found our missing shipmate and appreciate all the hard work of our Sailors and Japanese partners in searching for him," Rear Adm. Charles Williams, commander, Carrier Strike Group 5 and Task Force 70, said in a statement. "I am relieved that this Sailor's family will not be joining the ranks of Gold Star Families that have sacrificed so much for our country."

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USS Shiloh -- a US Navy guided-missile cruiser
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USS Shiloh -- a US Navy guided-missile cruiser

In this handout image provided by the U.S. Navy, the guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67) is underway December 21, 2004 in the waters of Western Pacific Ocean. The USS Shiloh has been ordered to the Bay of Bengal, to aid in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief after a Tsunami hit coastal regions throughout Southeast Asia. Over 80,000 Tsunami related deaths have been reported since the December 26 natural disaster.

(Photo by Patrick M. Bonafede/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)

The USS Shiloh (CG-67), a U.S. Navy guided-missile cruiser, is docked at a port along Subic Bay, Zambales province, north of Manila, Philippines May 30, 2015. USS Shiloh (CG-67) arrived in the country on Friday to replenish supplies and strengthen ties with the Philippines through outreach programs as part of routine port call, the U.S. embassy in Manila said in a statement.

(REUTERS/Lorgina Minguito)

Visitors walk on the bow of the guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh while anchored at Subic Bay, a former US naval base in the Philippines, on May 30, 2015, as part of an ongoing US military patrol in the South China Sea amid rising tensions over China's building of artificial islands over reefs in the sea that are also claimed by other neighbors including the Philippines, a US military ally. US Defence Secretary Ashton Carter, speaking at a high-level security conference in Singapore, called on May 30, for an 'immediate and lasting halt' to reclamation works in disputed South China Sea waters.

(ROBERT GONZAGA/AFP/Getty Images)

USS cruiser Shiloh attends the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force fleet reviews off Sagami Bay, Japan's Kanagawa prefecture on October 14, 2012. Forty-five MSDF vessels and one ship each from the US, Australian and Singaporean navies participated in the fleet review.

(KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/GettyImages)

The guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh is anchored at Subic Bay, a former US naval base in the Philippines, on May 30, 2015, as part of an ongoing US military patrol in the South China Sea amid rising tensions over China's building of artificial islands over reefs in the sea that are also claimed by other neighbors including the Philippines, a US military ally. US Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, speaking at a high-level security conference in Singapore, called on May 30, for an 'immediate and lasting halt' to reclamation works in disputed South China Sea waters.

(ROBERT GONZAGA/AFP/Getty Images)

In this handout image provided by the U.S. Navy, the guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67) is underway December 21, 2004 in the waters of Western Pacific Ocean. The USS Shiloh has been ordered to the Bay of Bengal, to aid in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief after a Tsunami hit coastal regions throughout Southeast Asia. Over 80,000 Tsunami related deaths have been reported since the December 26 natural disaster.

(Photo by Patrick M. Bonafede/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)

A Tomahawk cruise missile launches from the stern vertical launch system of the USS Shiloh (CG 67) to attack selected air defense targets south of the 33rd parallel in Iraq September 3, 1996, as part of Operation Desert Strike. A Joint Strike mission took place with with over 100 cruise missiles being launched at targets in Iraq.

(Photo by Department of Defense/Getty Images)

The USS Shiloh pulls into port at the Naval Station San Diego April 25, 2003 in California. The Shiloh and the USS Mobile Bay returned from a 10-month deployment to the Persian Gulf where they played an active roll in the war against Iraq.

(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty images)

A Tomahawk missile is launched from the U.S. Navy's Ticonderoga Class cruiser USS Shiloh, in the northern Arabian Gulf on the morning of September 3. Allied-planes faced off with two Iraqi MIGs without incident and fired at anti-aircraft radar September 4 on the first day of patrolling an expanded no-fly zone in Iraq.

(Ho New / Reuters)

A Standard Missile Three (SM-3) is launched from the guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67) during a joint U.S. Missile Defense Agency, U.S. Navy ballistic missile flight test in the Pacific Ocean, June 22, 2006. Two minutes later, the SM-3 intercepted a separating ballistic missile threat target, launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Barking Sands on Kauai, Hawaii. The test was the seventh intercept, in eight program flight tests, by the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense. The maritime capability is designed to intercept short to medium-range ballistic missile threats in the midcourse phase of flight.

(REUTERS/U.S. Navy/Handout)

U.S. Navy sailors stand on the deck of the USS Shiloh (CG-67), the first missile-defense capable ship to be deployed to Japan, at the U.S. naval base in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo August 29, 2006.

*REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Sailors assigned to the Warlords of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 51 decontaminate an SH-60B Seahawk helicopter on the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh while conducting a radiation survey in this U.S. Navy handout photo dated March 23, 2011. Shiloh is currently off the north eastern coast of Japan conducting humanitarian assistance operations as part of Operation Tomodachi following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami. Picture taken March 23, 2011.

(REUTERS/U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Charles Oki/Handout)

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