Why Chelsea Manning makes her visitors put their electronics in the microwave

Days after walking free from a military prison, Chelsea Manning is staying in a small apartment in New York — and asking visitors to put their electronics in into an unplugged microwave in order to block any possible attempts at espionage.

"You can't be too careful," Manning, 29, told New York Times Magazine reporter Matthew Shaer when he stopped by her apartment for a post-release interview.

After leaking hundreds of thousands of highly classified documents during her time as a soldier in the US military, Manning spent 7 years in a military prison before former President Barack Obama commuted her her 35-year sentence.

RELATED: Chelsea Manning is released from prison

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Media wait at the front gate of U.S. Army base Fort Leavenworth for the expected departure of Chelsea Manning in Leavenworth, Kansas, U.S., May 17, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Media crews wait outside US Army facility Fort Leavenworth in Leavenworth, Kansas, before dawn on May 17, 2017. After seven years behind bars, US Army Private Chelsea Manning will walk out of the security gates of the Fort Leavenworth military prison, finally able to complete her transition as a free, openly transgender woman. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Media crews wait outside US Army facility Fort Leavenworth in Leavenworth, Kansas, before dawn on May 17, 2017. After seven years behind bars, US Army Private Chelsea Manning will walk out of the security gates of the Fort Leavenworth military prison, finally able to complete her transition as a free, openly transgender woman. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Media crews wait outside US Army facility Fort Leavenworth in Leavenworth, Kansas, before dawn on May 17, 2017. After seven years behind bars, US Army Private Chelsea Manning will walk out of the security gates of the Fort Leavenworth military prison, finally able to complete her transition as a free, openly transgender woman. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Cars exit and enter US Army facility Fort Leavenworth in Leavenworth, Kansas, on May 17, 2017. After seven years behind bars, US Army Private Chelsea Manning will walk out of the security gates of the Fort Leavenworth military prison, finally able to complete her transition as a free, openly transgender woman. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the media report on the release of Chelsea Manning outside of Fort Leavenworth, in Leavenworth Kansas, U.S. May 17, 2017. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
First steps of freedom!! 😄 . . #chelseaisfree
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On May 17, Manning was released from prison and began the process of adapting to everyday life.

Now, she is temporarily staying in a one-bedroom Manhattan high-rise apartment that overlooks skyscrapers and bits of the Hudson River, according to the Times. Shortly after moving in, Manning installed an Xbox One video game console and put an unplugged microwave next to the front door.

For Manning's first in-person interview since 2008, she asked Shaer to put his laptop into the microwave by the door in order to block any possible transmissions with the device's Faraday cage, which blocks all electromagnetic transmissions.

"You can put it in the kitchen microwave," Manning told Shaer, who found it already contained two Xbox controllers that contain microphones.

After starting her sentence at the Kansas military prison, Manning has fought numerous legal battles with the military after they refused to provide her with drugs for gender dysphoria. During the course of her 7-year-sentence, Manning has gone on a hunger strike, was placed in solitary confinement, and attempted to commit suicide twice.

RELATED: 8 Things You Didn't Know Your Microwave Could Do

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Here's proof that your microwave can do more than you think.

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Helps You With Your Tears

Will your microwave wipe away your tears and tell you its all going to be OK? No, that's what your friends are for. Your microwave will, however, help make the experience of cutting onions less emotional. Simply microwave your onion for 30 seconds and you'll see that your peeling and chopping will no longer induce tears.

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Makes Time Travel Possible

How many times have you wanted to cook beans but you can't because you didn't soak them overnight? That's where your microwave saves the day. Again. You want to allocate 3 cups of water for every 1 cup of dry beans. Place beans in water in a large microwave-safe dish, cover, and cook on the highest setting until it boils, about 15 minutes. Remove beans from the microwave and let stand for 1 hour. Drain beans, discard water and then rinse beans with fresh, cool water. It's like you traveled back in time and soaked your beans!

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Gives You Proof

Yeast dough can take an hour or more to rise at room temperature. Your bakery sous chef, the microwave, can proof yeast dough in about 15 minutes. Place an 8-ounce cup of water in the back of the microwave. You want to place your dough in a plastic-covered bowl in front of the water in the center of the microwave. Heat the dough on the lowest power for 3 minutes. Allow your dough to rest in the microwave for 3 minutes. You're almost there. Heat your dough for 3 minutes longer then let it rest for 6 minutes. Your dough has now doubled. Take a bow, microwave.

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Makes Life Sweet

That's right, your microwave sweetens up life with its ability to morph brick-like dark sugar into supple, use-friendly dark sugar. Place your sugar in a microwave safe bowl and cover it with a moist paper towel, and heat for 20 seconds. If it requires further softening, nuke it for an additional 20 seconds.

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Hooks You Up With Herbs

Are you spending money on dried herbs or wasting money because you can't go through an entire bunch of fresh herbs? Have no fear, your microwave is here! You don't want to pile up your herbs. Instead, place leaves on a single layer on a microwave-safe plate. Cover the plate with a paper towel and microwave on high for 1 minute. Keep heating in increments of 20 seconds until your herbs are dried.

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Helps You Out In Sticky Situations

Honey sometimes has the pesky habit of crystallizing. If your honey comes in a glass jar, simply remove the lid, and heat it in the microwave in 30 to 40 second increments until it returns to its original glory. Just be careful when you're handling a hot jar!

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Makes Life Less Stale

What's the point of having bread if its stale and not edible? Your microwave is around to make sure that travesty never happens. Place your stale bread in a damp towel and then perk it up by nuking it in 10 second increments. The same procedure can be used to bring your stale potato chips back to life.

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Helps You Show Some Skin

Hard squashes and root vegetables can be cumbersome to peel. But not with your new BFF the microwave. Depending on the size, place the vegetable in your microwave for 2 to 3 minutes and the exterior skin should be more pliable for peeling and cutting.

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