A conservative think tank has mailed a book challenging climate change to over 10,000 US science teachers

Conservative think tank The Heartland Institute has been mailing tens of thousands of U.S. science teachers a book that challenges the scientific consensus on climate change, Buzzfeed and The New York Times report.

The book, "Why Scientists Disagree About Climate Change," is a 136-page work that proposes human-driven climate change has been overblown as a threat to global stability in the coming decades.

However, the most recent surveys find at least 97% of the scientific community agree the Earth is getting warmer due to the growing presence of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

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NASA photos show why the Paris Agreement was signed

Photographs from the 1940s to the 2000s show the drastic impact of climate change on our planet's glaciers. Here is a photo of Alaska's Muir Glacier, pictured in August 1941 (left) and August 2004 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Here's the snow that remained on Matterhorn Mountain in Switzerland in August 1960 (left), compared with August 2005 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Starting in the 1970s, NASA began using satellite images to document deforestation in several national parks around the world. Here's Mount Elgon National Park in Uganda in 1973 (left), compared with the park in 2005 (right).

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The deforestation of Argentina's Salta Forest is starkly visible in this pair of photos from 1972 (left) and 2009 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

More deforestation is visible in Kenya's Mau Forest in these photos from January 1973 (left) and December 2009 (right).

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A similar story applies to Kenya's Lake Nakuru National Park, shown here in 1973 (left) and 2000 (right).

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Deforestation is also prevalent in the South American Atlantic Forest in Paraguay — here's how it looked in 1973 (left) versus 2008 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

This area of Rondonia, Brazil was heavily deforested between 1975 (left) and 2009 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

So was the Baban Rafi Forest in Niger, from 1976 (left) to 2007 (right).

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These images show the deforestation of Mount Kenya Forest in Kenya, 1976 (left) vs. 2007 (right).

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Climate change began to take a more extreme toll on glaciers in the 1970s as well. Here is a photo of Qori Kalis Glacier in Peru in 1978 (left) and again in 2011 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

These images document melting ice in Ecuador, from March 1986 (left) to February 2007 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Beginning in the 1980s, NASA also documented shrinking lakes across the globe, starting with this photo of Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado in 1987 (left). The same park is shown in 2011 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

The Aral Sea in Central Asia shrunk drastically between 2000 (left) and 2014 (right).

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So did the Elephant Butte Reservoir in New Mexico. Here it is in 1994 (left) and again in 2013 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Rivers have been shrinking in Arizona and Utah as well — these images compare them in March 1999 (left) and May 2014 (right).

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Argentina's Mar Chiquita Lake shrunk significantly from 1998 (left) to 2011 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

And deforestation continued to take a toll as time went on, as evidenced by this pair of images of the Mabira Forest in Uganda in 2001 (left) and the same area just 5 years later (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Droughts have affected the US intensely over the past few years as well. Here are three images of water drying up in Kansas, taken in 2010 (left), 2011 (middle), and 2012 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Iran's shrinking Lake Urmia is pictured below in July 2000 (left) and again in the same month in 2013 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

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In response to the Heartland Institute's efforts, four Democratic US senators — Sheldon Whitehouse, Edward Markey, Elizabeth Warren, and Brian Schatz — sent a letter to Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos alerting her to the misinformation being spread to the nation's educators.

"I'm appalled at the Heartland Institute's gall to think we are dumb enough to buy into this," Cheryl Manning, a science teacher at Evergreen High School in Colorado, told Buzzfeed.

SEE ALSO: Former intel chief: Trump asked me to publicly refute the 'infamous' dossier, 'which I could not and would not do'

​​​​Manning was one of eight science teachers at the school to receive the book.

Despite the overwhelming agreement that Earth's temperatures are rising, getting more erratic on a seasonal timescale, and disturbing the natural rhythms of plants and animals, the politics surrounding climate change have made it a contentious issue.

"What people 'believe' about global warming doesn't reflect what they know," Dan Kahan, a Yale researcher who studies political polarization, told the Times. "It expresses who they are."

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