George W. Bush’s daughters reveal they attempted to 'veto' his presidential run

During a Facebook Live Q&A on Friday, former President George W. Bush's daughters shared a story that could have altered the course of the U.S. and the rest of the world.

While promoting their new book, "Sisters First: Stories From Our Wild and Wonderful Life," Jenna and Barbara Bush were asked if there were any moments when they wished their dad wasn't president.

Jenna responded, "When we were 18 and our dad sat us down to tell us he was running for president...we both tried to veto that idea."

Click through photos of Michelle Obama and George W. Bush together:

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Photos of pals Michelle Obama and George W. Bush together
Former President George W. Bush (L) holds hands with first lady Michelle Obama during a memorial service following the multiple police shootings in Dallas, Texas, U.S., July 12, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Former president George W. Bush (L) and First Lady Michelle Obama talk during a memorial service following the multiple police shootings in Dallas, Texas, U.S., July 12, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
First lady Michelle Obama kisses former President George W. Bush as he shakes hands with U.S. President Barack Obama after Bush spoke at a memorial service for five policemen killed last week in a sniper attack in Dallas, Texas July 12, 2016. At left is former first lady Laura Bush. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Former first lady Laura Bush ( from L to R), former president George W. Bush, first lady Michelle Obama, U.S. President Barack Obama and U.S. Representative John Lewis (D-GA) participate in a commemoration at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, March 7, 2015. Obama called on Americans to carry forward the spirit of the Civil Rights Movement on Saturday during a visit to Selma, Alabama, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of a march that sparked the 1965 Voting Rights Act. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY SOCIETY)
(L-R) Former U.S. first lady Laura Bush and former president George W. Bush join current first lady Michelle Obama and U.S. President Barack Obama for a commemoration at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, March 7, 2015. With a nod to ongoing U.S. racial tension and threats to voting rights, Obama declared the work of the Civil Rights Movement advanced but unfinished on Saturday during a visit to the Alabama bridge that spawned a landmark voting law. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) poses alongside former U.S. President George W. Bush, former first lady Laura Bush and first lady Michelle Obama after the Bushs' official White House portraits were unveiled during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington May 31, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
U.S. President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, former president George W. Bush (2nd L) and Laura Bush salute the flag during tenth anniversary ceremonies at the National September 11 Memorial at the World Trade Center site in New York, September 11, 2011. The 9/11 attacks changed life in the United States forever, but 10 years after the devastating hit, New Yorkers have learned to live in a more dangerous world and are ready to move on. REUTERS/Allan Tannenbaum/Pool (UNITED STATES)
U.S. President George W. Bush greets U.S. President-elect Barack Obama (L) on the North Portico of the White House in Washington, January 20, 2009. First lady Laura Bush is second from left, and Michelle Obama is at right. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
U.S. President George W. Bush (R) kisses Michelle Obama on the North Portico of the White House in Washington January 20, 2009. First lady Laura Bush (L) and President-elect Barack Obama chat prior to going inside the White House. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
US President George W. Bush greets President-elect Barack Obama and his wife Michelle (C) as they arrive to the White House in Washington, November 10, 2008. REUTERS/Jim Bourg (UNITED STATES)
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Explaining her statement, she said, "I think like normal 18 year olds, we really wanted to enjoy college...and grow and make mistakes, which we did...but I think pretty fast, pretty soon into his tenure, we realized how awesome it is to live history and how lucky we really were and are."

Barbara also emphasized the positive aspects of that time, adding, "Through him we got to travel around the world with our mom and our dad, so we got incredible exposure and got to meet unbelievable people, and that of course, outweighed any reservations that we had."

The Washington Post recently noted that George W. Bush's favorability ratings have gone up significantly since his presidency ended.

As the Post reports, "presidents historically have almost always seen their image improve after leaving office. Not being in the news or engaged in the heated political debates of the day makes people more nostalgic for you. They remember the good times and forget — or at least forgive you for — some of the bad."

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