Obama Presidential Center will not house official papers and artifacts

The Obama Presidential Center is shaping up to be unlike any other presidential library before it ... in at least one way.

President Obama revealed in early May the design for his presidential center in Chicago, but now more details are emerging on the project.

Unlike past presidential libraries, President Obama's official papers and artifacts will not be housed in the center. Instead they be digitized and stored elsewhere by the National Archives and Records Administration and made available through loans.

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It was also revealed that Dr. Louise Bernard has been chosen for the role, which involves leading "the design, development and operation" of the Center's Museum.

Bernard is the outgoing director of exhibitions at the New York Public Library.

In the announcement, she said she looks forward to "bringing President and Mrs. Obama's remarkable story to the broadest possible audience," as well as spotlighting civic engagement.

Michael B. Moore, the president and CEO of the International African American Museum, called Bernard a superstar, telling the Chicago Tribune:

"Her magic is coming up with dynamic ways of engaging people in interesting kinds of ways."

The center will be based in Jackson Park on the southside of Chicago.

It intends to bring people together to shape "what it means to be a good citizen in the 21st century."
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