Islamic state claims responsibility for World Manila attack

CAIRO, June 2 (Reuters) - Islamic State has claimed responsibility for an attack on a casino in the Philippine capital Manila that killed at least 36 people on Friday, the group's Amaq news agency said, after officials said there was no evidence of militant involvement.

A gunman burst into the Resorts World Manila entertainment complex on Friday, firing shots, setting gaming tables alight and killing at least 36 people, all suffocating in thick smoke, in what officials have believed was a botched robbery. (Reporting by Ahmed Tolba; Writing by Ahmed Aboulenein; Editing by Hugh Lawson)

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates. The previous Reuters report is below.

MANILA, June 2 (Reuters) - A gunman burst into a casino in the Philippine capital Manila on Friday, firing shots, setting gaming tables alight and killing at least 36 people, all suffocating in thick smoke, in what officials believe was a botched robbery.

There was no evidence linking the attack at the Resorts World Manila entertainment complex to fighting between government troops and Islamist militants in the country's south, said Ernesto Abella, a spokesman for President Rodrigo Duterte.

"All indications point to a criminal act by an apparently emotionally disturbed individual," Abella told a news conference. "Although the perpetrator gave warning shots, there apparently was no indication that he wanted to do harm or shoot anyone."

RELATED: Photos from the tragic incident

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Attack at Philippine casino
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Attack at Philippine casino
A security guard stops photographers from entering the vicinity of Resorts World Manila after gunshots and explosions were heard in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Evacuated employees and guests of hotels stand along a road and watch as smoke billows from a Resorts World building in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
An armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) arrives near the Resorts World Manila after gunshots and explosions were heard in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A policeman alights from an armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) near the Resorts World Manila after gunshots and explosions were heard in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
An armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) arrives near the Resorts World Manila after gunshots and explosions were heard in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A tourist wearing a bathrobe stands after he was evacuated from the Resorts World Manila after gunshots and explosions were heard in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Evacuated employees of a hotel are pictured near a situation at a Resorts World building in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A tourist wearing a bathrobe gestures after he was evacuated from the Resorts World Manila after gunshots and explosions were heard in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Policemen stand guard near evacuated employees of a hotel near a situation at a Resorts World building, in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Smoke billows from the Resorts World building in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Smoke billows from the Resorts World building in Pasay City, Metro Manila, Philippines June 2, 2017. REUTERS/Erik De Castro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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The gunman killed himself in his hotel room after being shot and wounded by resort security, police and Resorts World management said. A second "person of interest" who was in the casino at the time was cooperating with the investigation, police said.

Most of the dead suffocated in the chaos. Fire bureau spokesman Ian Manalo said many guests and staff had tried to hide from the gunfire rather than get out of the building when attack began shortly after midnight (1600 GMT) and fell victim to the choking smoke.

Oscar Albayalde, chief of the capital's police office, said those who died were in the casino's main gaming area.

"What caused their deaths is the thick smoke," he told reporters. "The room was carpeted and of course the tables, highly combustible."

A Resorts World Manila official said the dead included 22 guests.

DEATH IN ROOM 510

At dawn, the body of the suspected gunman was found in a hotel room in the smoldering complex, which is close to Ninoy Aquino International Airport and an air force base, police said.

"He burned himself inside the hotel room 510," national police chief Ronald dela Rosa told a news conference. "He lay down on the bed, covered himself in a thick blanket and apparently doused himself in gasoline."

Resorts World Manila Chief Operating Officer Stephen Reilly said casino security guards had shot and wounded the gunman - armed with what authorities described as a "baby armalite" - during the attack.

"Severe loss of blood from the gunshot wound significantly slowed down the assailant and resulted to his holing up in the room where he took his own life," Reilly said.

Officials said at least 54 people were hurt, some seriously, as they rushed to escape what was at first was believed to have been a militant attack.

Survivor Magdalena Ramos, who was a guest at the hotel, said people began shouting "ISIS! ISIS!" when the gunfire began. The 57-year-old said she hid in a kitchen and then fled when the smoke became too thick.

But police quickly said they did not believe the attacker had any militant connections.

"We cannot attribute this to terrorism," national police chief dela Rosa told DZMM radio.

"We are looking into a robbery angle because he did not hurt any people and went straight to the casino chips storage room. He parked at the second floor and barged into the casino, shooting large TV screens and poured gasoline on a table setting it on fire," he said.

Earlier reports said the gunman may have been white, but police later said he appeared to be Filipino, although they were still establishing his nationality.

Kimberly Molitas, a spokeswoman for the capital's police office, said 113 million pesos ($2.27 million) worth of casino chips stolen during the raid had been recovered.

GUNSHOTS, PANIC

Videos posted on social media showed people fleeing as several loud bangs went off.

"Even the security personnel panicked," casino guest Jeff Santos told a radio station. "Definitely us patrons we did not expect that, everyone ran away."

Jeri Ann Santiago, who works in the emergency room at the San Juan de Dios hospital, said patients were suffering from smoke inhalation and some had fractures. None had gunshot wounds, she said.

The Philippines has been on heightened alert amid a crisis in the south of the country, where troops have been battling Islamist rebels since May 23.

Duterte declared martial law on the southern island of Mindanao last week and has warned it could become a haven for Islamic State supporters fleeing Iraq and Syria.

Security was tightened around the presidential palace on Friday, with armored personal carriers stationed on approach roads and river ferries barred from passing close by.

Taiwan's foreign ministry said four Taiwan nationals were among those killed and a South Korean foreign ministry official said one South Korean had died, apparently after a heart attack.

Shares in resort owner Travellers International Hotel Group Inc, a joint venture of the Philippines' Alliance Global Group Inc and Genting Hong Kong Ltd, fell 7 percent.

(Additional reporting by Peter Blaza, Clare Baldwin, Karen Lema, Manuel Mogato, Enrico Dela Cruz and Martin Petty in MANILA and Ju-min Park in SEOUL; Writing by Alex Richardson and Lincoln Feast; Editing by Robert Birsel and Nick Macfie)

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